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Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: SMD 30/33 h(i)
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 October 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAdela Villiers Smith nee Villiers
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This typescripted extract from a letter to Adela Villiers Smith was produced by Cronwright-Schreiner using original letters when he was preparing The Life... (1924) and The Letters of Olive Schreiner (1924). With a few exceptions, the original letters in his possession were then destroyed, as with many Schreiner letters he had been given by Adela Villiers Smith. When Schreiner’s originals can be compared, this shows his versions to be severely shortened, and/or inaccurate in sometimes minor but sometimes major respects, while their frequent multiple dates (eg. 8-15 August, or August) indicate that he often combined a number of original letters, among other bowdlerisations and intrusions as well as deletions. While this surviving Villiers Smith extract, archived among Cronwright-Schreiner’s miscellaneous papers, is affected by the same problems, it is provided for the sake of completeness, because it gives clues as to where Schreiner was resident, and indicates some of her activities. However, it should be read and used with considerable caution for the reasons spelled out here.
1To Mrs. Francis Smith
2De Aar, 23 Oct. 1910
3
4
5 … Last night we had an earthquake here. I had been bad and lain down
6all day, but at 9 o’clock I went out to look at the stars and breathe
7a little. It was perfectly, deadly still not a breath of air stirring
8and I came back, and lay down on my bed again. At a quarter past nine,
9a most astonishing series of shocks began with the most terrific noise
10I ever heard in my life. The house reeled and shook, and when you
11stood up on the floor you felt like a little rat in the jaws of a
12great dog that was shaking you this way and that, and the noise was
13astonishing, a sound of bursting and rushing. After the first shock
14there was a pause and then it began again, but it was all over in
15three or four minutes and a perfect dead silence reigned again. I have
16been through several earthquake shocks in Italy, that great one that
17killed so many people in 1889, I think it was. But though the ground
18moved much more, the noise was nothing to this. This morning the hotel
19keeper’s wife in the Camp sent up the barman early before breakfast to
20ask how I was, knowing I’d been here alone, and the man told me nearly
21every bottle and glass was smashed in the bar, but I haven’t seen
22anyone else to-day to know if much damage was done.
23
24

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: SMD 30/33 h(ii)
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 August 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAdela Villiers Smith nee Villiers
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This typescripted extract from a letter to Adela Villiers Smith was produced by Cronwright-Schreiner using original letters when he was preparing The Life... (1924) and The Letters of Olive Schreiner (1924). With a few exceptions, the original letters in his possession were then destroyed, as with many Schreiner letters he had been given by Adela Villiers Smith. When Schreiner’s originals can be compared, this shows his versions to be severely shortened, and/or inaccurate in sometimes minor but sometimes major respects, while their frequent multiple dates (eg. 8-15 August, or August) indicate that he often combined a number of original letters, among other bowdlerisations and intrusions as well as deletions. While this surviving Villiers Smith extract, archived among Cronwright-Schreiner’s miscellaneous papers, is affected by the same problems, it is provided for the sake of completeness, because it gives clues as to where Schreiner was resident, and indicates some of her activities. However, it should be read and used with considerable caution for the reasons spelled out here.
1To Mrs. Francis Smith
2De Aar, 3rd Aug. 1910
3
4 … I am trying Upton Sinclair’s starving plan, absolute fasting. I have
5just begun; for 42 hours I have now tasted nothing but two cups of
6water, very small ones. If the de Aar water was good and I could drink
7much, which is allowed I think it would be much better. I shall keep
8on till next Thursday night. That will be 108 hours. If I find that it
9does good I’ll try it for ten days. I’m afraid you couldn’t try it if
10you are too thin. Last night I still felt hungry and when I saw my
11husband eating his supper wished so much for a slice of brown bread.
12Now I have got to the point where you feel a dislike for food or drink.
13 It is very cold weather here. We had 6 degrees of frost last night:
14the only drawback is that (it) feels a little cold. I think summer
15would be the best time to try it. I wonder if the doctors have ever
16tried it for you. The idea is that it takes all the poison germs out
17of the system.
18
19
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mr Boonzaier 87.17/1/Boon/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1902 ; Before End: 1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToDaniel Cornelis Boonzaier
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter can be approximately dated around Schreiner's comment about women?s emancipation as having been written after the South African War and before she left South Africa for Europe in late 1913, and perhaps most likely between 1907 and 1913.
1 Dear Mr Boonzier
2
3 I didn't make myself clear. I should really feel it an honour to be
4sketched by you; but I don't care to have my self printed ^& don't
5think any one here would care to have it.^ I'll write something for the
6paper when I can manage it.
7
8 Yours ever
9 Olive Schreiner
10
11 P.S.
12 I'm always hoping you will see the question of women's emancipation
13from my stand^-point^ & give us one of your finest pictures one of these
14days!
15
16
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/a
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 August 1886
Address FromThe Convent, Harrow, London
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 103
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 The Convent
2 Harrow
3 Aug 5 / 86
4
5 My dear E.C.
6
7 So many people are wanting copies of of your paper on Simplification
8of Life. Couldn't you publish it in separate pamphlet form. I think it
9would be rather a good thing if at some time soon you could gather
10your papers together & publish them in news a small vol=
11including the 'Interest" paper. I hope whenever you publish anything
12fresh you will at once let me know.
13
14 I have been reading Whitman of late with much more enjoyment than ever
15before. I find he's not so good as you are when one is ill & wants
16help & strength, one needs to be strong & in overflowing health really
17to enjoy him. I wonder whether you find it so.
18
19 I'm so glad to hear you saw Mrs Walters, but its only after knowing
20her for years that the beauty of her character becomes clear.
21
22 O. Schreiner
23
Notation
For Carpenter's 'simplification of life' ideas, see Edward Carpenter (1905) The Simplification of Life: From the Writings of Edward Carpenter London: A. Treherne & Co. The Whitman which Schreiner was reading is: Walt Whitman (1855) Leaves of Grass New York: Brooklyn. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/b
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 December 1899
Address FromNewlands, Cape Town
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 229
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 Old years night
2
3 Dear Ed
4
5 This is just a note to tell you that Cron is going to England next
6week. He sails on the 10th by the Norman, so will get to England about
7the 25th. He is going home to hold meetings & see people on the South
8African question. This hellish war is still going on, but the
9capitalists are finding the African Boer a little tougher to swallow
10than they thought; impossible as it seems when our numbers are
11considered I believe we shall yet win & our Republics keep their
12freedom. If he comes up north you might help a bit getting the working
13men together Sheffield way. His address will be care
14
15 JA Hobson
16 Elmstead
17 Limpsfield
18 Surrey
19
20 Olive
21
22 My address will be still Lyndall
23 Newlands
24 Cape Town
25
26 ^I can't leave I must stay here to see how things go. OS^
27
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/c
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date17 June 1904
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 243-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 Hanover
2 June 17 / 04
3
4 Dear old Edward
5
6 Some friends have asked me to come to England & they say you wanted me
7to come too. It can't be that I go. But its very very very beautiful
8that you any of you want me. I specially want to see you again.
9
10 It's a cold night. I am sitting in the little front room of our three
11roomed cottage with a fire at my back. We have 16 degrees of frost
12here at night often in the winter, the milk froze solid in the pantry
13the other night, & to-day a dish of water standing in the yard which
14was frozen last night was not melted except at the edges this evening
15though the sun had been shining on it all day. I have never felt cold
16anywhere in Europe except once in Geneva where a little north wind was
17blowing.
18
19 Cron has gone to the Transvaal, & I & my meerkats, & my dog & a little
20Kaffir boy of nine years old whom I brought up from the reformatory in
21Cape Town have the world to ourselves. My dear old meerkat, 'Arriet,
22is sleeping on my shoulder. She will sit there for hours wide awake
23while I write & do my work. I'm always so glad I didn't come into the
24world when people had killed off all the dear beautiful animals &
25birds.
26
27 My little Kaffir boy is so nice. He was sentenced for four years for
28killing a goat. He has served two in the Reformatory & I have got him
29for two. He is only a baby, & so sweet & dear. I am feeding him up: he
30is awfully thin. I am so fond of Kaffirs, there's a kind of natural
31affinity between me & them. And the capitalist are working for a big
32war with them soon, & we shall murder them right & left. They will
33kill a good many of us because they have been all armed & trained by
34the British during the war, & England will be greatly surprised when
35the war comes at what she has drawn on herself; but in the end the
36natives will be crushed & the capitalist will have cheap native labour,
37 when the tribal & communal system which now prevents the employers
38from blood-sucking them, is broken up. Besides some of their
39territories are rich in mineral wealth & the white man wants it.
40
41 Its pretty sad out here, Edward, in many, many ways. The saddest
42thing is the reaction that has come over us since the war, or rather
43since the "peace". The little quiet Boer woman who the day after we
44heard of the "peace" came to my rooms & when I told her that the
45"peace" had been made & the Republics had not got their independence
46unreadable ^threw^ her arms over her head & astonished me by crying,
47"Then there is no God! There is no God!" is very indicative of our
48state of mind. There is a kind of awful moral disintegration among us.
49England here is going straight on to her destruction but the effects
50of the war upon us have been very terrible.
51
52 Edith Ellis says she saw you lately & you were looking well. I'm so
53glad. I have had a very beautiful little visit to Cape Town while my
54husband was there in Parliament. It was so beautiful to see my four
55friends. Now I've come back to this strange, sad unearthly little
56village, which doesn't seem to be in world at all, & my visit seems
57like a glorious dream. But its much to have had a lovely dream. And
58now the beautiful letters I have had from Edith & Mr Lawrence & other
59friends asking me to come to England have been a great joy to me, how
60great I can't explain because no one knows how lonely this life is.
61
62 I can't go to England because I couldn't leave my husband for so long
63just for my own pleasure. I should always fancy he might be ill, or
64might need me. And I couldn't do any good by going to England. There's
65nothing to be done by talking now for this sad land. A better day will
66come, but much has to be lived through first.
67
68 Dear Edward I wish I could see. I wasn't half grateful enough when I
69was in England for all my many friends. Whatever life has or hasn't
70given me, it's given me the best friends any one ever had. (I wish you
71could see my little meerkat sitting here with her head under my chin
72as I write. She's so lovely.)
73
74 Good night. Remember me to all the old friends.
75 Olive
76
77 ^You see Edward, the terrible point in our position in South Africa now
78is that its not true. Since the 'peace' came, we, naturally, are
79acting a part. We know perfectly well that we are not beaten, & that
80we are going to conquer in the long run & that England will someday go
81out bag & baggage, & yet we are all to act as if we didn't know this.
82Perhaps, it may be said, its the only attitude people crushed for the
83moment can assume. How painful it is, how it makes one resolve you
84will absolutely say nothing at all. I think you can understand. I do
85not object to silence. But I do object to protestations of loyalty to
86the King or the Empire, when we know we are cursing them in our hearts.
87 The curious thing to see is that England can be taken in by it. This
88is private, Edward.^
89
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/ci
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLettercard
Letter Date2 November 1900
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 231
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner lettercard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, and the address it was sent to is on its front. Schreiner was resident in Hanover from September 1900 to October 1907, after 1902 with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere.
1 Dear Edward
2
3 Thanks for your article: it's very good - first rate. I am sending you
4a copy of my speech to ^letter^ at a woman's meeting at Somerset East.
5The jingoes are very anxious the British government would take action
6against me & arrest me for high treason! They are a funny people the
7jingoes. Eyes have they but they see not ears have they but they hear
8not. Things here are going from bad to worse. They are beginning to
9take women & children as prisoners of war on the charge the woman aid
10the men. war will not be over for another year at least. The
11Republicans are
12
13^not yet beaten! The war is not over.
14
15Olive^
16
Notation
The article Carpenter had sent cannot be established. Schreiner spoke at or wrote addresses for the Volkskongresses and peace congresses which protested the South African War, as follows: Graaff-Reinet Volkskongres, April 1900 (spoke); Cape Town women's meeting, June 1900 (spoke); Somerset East peace congress, October 1900 (a letter of address); Paarl, November 1900 peace congress (a letter of address); Worcester Volkskongres, December 1900 (spoke). Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/cii
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLettercard
Letter Date22 October 1900
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 230
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner lettercard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 Hanover
2 Oct 22 / 00
3
4 Dear old Ed,
5
6 The fight still goes on here, & still I have not lost heart, but
7believe that right must in the end prevail - though most people think
8me mad for doing so.
9
10 I am sending you a speech in an African paper. I am living here in
11such a sweet ideal little karroo village nearly 5,000 feet above the
12sea, & am much better. The air is so clean & pure. How you would love
13this place.
14
15 Greetings to all the dear friends.
16 Olive
17
Notation
The speech published in a newspaper (presumably by Schreiner herself) which she sent to Carpenter cannot be established, but is likely to be one of those she wrote or gave as an address to a peace congress. Schreiner sent written addresses to some of the Volkskongresses and peace congresses and she spoke at others, as follows: Graaff-Reinet Volkskongres, April 1900 (spoke); Cape Town women's meeting, June 1900 (spoke); Somerset East peace congress, October 1900 (a letter of address); Paarl, November 1900 peace congress (a letter of address); Worcester Volkskongres, December 1900 (spoke). Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/d
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 December 1902
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 234-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope. Schreiner was resident in Hanover from September 1900 to October 1907, after 1902 with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere.
1 Dec 20th 1902
2
3 Dear Edward
4
5 Have you ever read a most rare & beautiful book called "the soul of a
6people" by Fielding Hall? To me it is the most beautiful book, the
7book that has come nearest to me of all books I have read in my life.
8Read it & tell me what you feel towards it, & towards the writer.
9
10 My heart had felt so bitter & hard of late, & it has been like a
11beautiful soft rain falling on hard dry ground to read this book.
12
13 You must get it & read it, Edward, if you have not already. It's a
14soul something like Bobs the man shows in the book; & it's what he
15makes one feel rather than anything he directly says that makes the
16book so precious.
17
18 My love to you dear Edward
19 Olive
20
Notation
The book referred to is: Harold Fielding Hall (1898) The Soul of a People London: R. Bentley & Son. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/f
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1908
Address Fromna
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 276, 281-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, although this is not fully legible; the envelope also provides the address the letter was sent to.
1 Dear old Edward
2
3 I like Kokoro more than any book I've read for a long time. Have you
4read "the Souls of Black Folks" I advised you to get. Tell me if you
5can how it strikes you.
6
7 It's very strange the sympathy I feel with the Japs, & have always
8felt. It increases with all I know of them. That love of the past men
9& women & of your own dead. Ever since I was a child I've always
10thought if I had my ideal house there would be one room set apart
11where I would have the pictures of my dead & put flowers before them &
12anything that was beautiful to me. And I could go & sit there a little
13in quiet with them every day. It would be like a little chapel. - the
14only chapel I can think of - God, the whole life doesn't need a chapel
15- the sky is his roof. & I would have remembrances of all my animals
16that I have loved so utterly there. Buddhism is so much more wide &
17satisfying than Christianity can ever be, because it takes in the
18animal & world, & sees that all life is one.
19
20 When I was reading that book several times it came to me how foolish
21we are ever to feel lonely in this world. Some where, we may always in
22time & space there exists which feels & thinks exactly as we do. No
23one is ever really alone.
24
25 What do you think of matters in England? Is there going to be much of
26a forward movement? I fear not till the party splits & Grey & Asquith
27& the rest of their order go over to the other side.
28
29 ^I have just had a wire from dear old General Butler; to-day he has
30landed in Cape Town. He is the one Englishman we South Africans really
31love; I mean among public men. I hope all goes well with you. Have you
32any news of our Bob. It's such a long long time since I heard from him.
33
34 Olive^
35
Notation
The book Schreiner refers to as Kokoko is: Lefcadio Hearn (1895) Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life London: Gay & Bird. See also W.E.B. Du Bois (1903) The Souls of Black Folk Chicago: A.C. McClurg. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/gi
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 February 1908
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Feb 24 / 08
3
4 Dear Edward
5
6 Can you send this letter for me to "Bob". His address is in my desk at
7Hanover, where I shall not go for some months. Only think, Im
8expecting to see dear old Keir Hardie here tomorrow to spend a day!! I
9shall be glad to see him. He's been met by rotten eggs & all the
10modern modes of welcoming any one with liberal ideas in South Africa.
11The day will come, only a few years hence, when white people who stand
12for justice to the native will have to lay down their lives & meet
13death at the hands of mobs here.
14
15 If you could really understand affairs in Zulu-land & Natal
16
17^you would know what a diabolical game is being played there. Love to
18Kate Salt if you see her & all the old friends. You would know if you
19lived here a few months how one hungers for the folk who share at all
20ones outlook on life.
21
22 South Africa is quite 80 years behind Europe; & a century behind
23Australia & New Zealand.
24
25 Olive^
26
27

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/gii
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 February 1908
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 Feb 6th 1908
3
4 Dear Edward
5
6 Months ago I began the enclosed letter. I haven't written because I
7wanted to go on with it. But it's too big a subject to take up at a
8moment's odd time.
9
10 Yesterday I got your little pamphlet - very good - thanks. I've sent
11one copy to my friend Constance Lytton who when she wrote had been
12some weeks ill in bed as the result of influenza & found your book
13Love's coming of age her best companion. I always among so many other
14things want to come to England that I could show you to eachother. She
15is a "born" socialist; one who couldn't have been anything else in
16what ever country or age she had been born. One to whom the letter of
17socialism is not necessary because they always live in its spirit. How
18are you, dear old pall? I sometimes get afraid when I think I never
19come to England & see your, dear old face again.
20
21 For five months I have been living at a Railway camp in the desert
22called de Aar. Here four railway lines crossing South Africa meet; it
23is the greatest in fact the only great junction in the Colony & in the
24war it was one vast military camp much the biggest in South Africa. It
25was the great central camp & for miles & miles around the veld was
26trodden absolutely bear, & is still covered with their relics. We are
27living in one little room about a mile or three quarters of a mile
28from the camp ^station^, alone in the veld. Being here one is a little
29out of the dust & smoke of the trains. I have been very happy in this
30little room in spite of dust, & heat, & sand, & I am quite sorry my
31husband is building on some more rooms. It's really wonderful how the
32nature of your house simplifies & alters all life! But when the house
33is done in addition to the other rooms there will be one tiny spare
34room always ready for a traveller from Milthorp, if he should turn up.
35It will have a nice little plain blue paper on the wall, & be
36absolutely quiet. I've never had a spare room before except at
37Johannesburg. How it really seems to me perhaps you will turn up!
38
39 You would like de Aar better than most people, because you like heat &
40in summer the thermometer stands at 110 & 111 in the shade on a
41verandah but the winters are just pleasantly warm - then you like
42railway men, & here there are nothing but railway-men; "niggers"; &
43the few hotel keepers & shop keepers who supply their wants. There is
44no "society" here except the bank manager's wife, & the English
45clergyman's wife, & the Engineer's wife. And only the Bank Manager's
46wife has called on me. I think she was so shocked at my little room
47with its bedroom & bathroom & study all in one that the others never
48came. De Aar is a low, drunken cursing swearing place; but anyhow it's
49free! In other upcountry towns you are prosecuted if you play golf on
50Sunday & fined, but there they play cricket & foot ball.
51
52 The terribly oppressive shadow of the big Dutch Church, which rises up
53as the physical & mental centre of life in all upcountry towns &
54village, is very modest here, is very small & stands quite in the
55back-ground, & one can breath. My life is a very solitary one here,
56Cron goes to his business in the camp soon after seven in the morning,
57& I do not see a human creature again, except the little boy that
58brings the milk or water till near seven in the evening when Cron
59comes up for his bath & wash, & we we go down & have supper at the
60Hotel, where he has his dinner & breakfast. After supper we come up
61here generally about 8 o'clock: Cron works at his books accounts a
62little or goes to bed & reads, & I read or write & then go to bed: but
63its not nearly so lonely as Hanover as I do see Cron in the morning &
64evening & know he's well. I have my three dear little meerkats still,
65the eldest of whom is now over 7 years, an almost unheard of age for a
66meerkat, & Cron's little dog Ollie, who is the daughter of my dog &
67dear friend Neta.
68
69 I have just been reading a book which if you have not read it you must
70at once, you will find it very interesting, "Eskimo Life" by Nansen.
71He must be a lovable man there is a most delicious letter in the book
72from a Greenlander to his missing [page/s missing]
73
74 ^Good bye, write to me soon.
75 Olive^
76
77 ^Have you any late news of Bob & his family. I think the last letter I
78wrote to them must have been misaddressed. If not too much trouble
79give me their new address. I've had two very nice notes from your
80cousin. I want her to come & see me here in the winter.^
81
Notation
There is a missing page or pages after 'a Greenlander to his missing, with the next insertion on the first sheet of this letter. The 'enclosed letter' is no longer attached. It is not clear which pamphlet Carpenter had sent Schreiner, but from her comment about the earlier 'Love?s Coming of Age', it could be his (1908) The Intermediate Sex (London: Allen & Unwin). See also Edward Carpenter (1902) Love’s Coming of Age London: Swan Sonnenschein; and Fridtjof Nansen (1893) Eskimo Life London: Longman.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/h
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 January 1911
Address FromPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 Portlock
2 nr Graaff Reinet
3 Cape of Good Hope
4 Jan 7 / 11
5
6 Dear old Edward
7
8 It's born in on me I must write to you, though why I don't know. I'm
9staying on a farm high up among the mountains fifteen miles from the
10nearest railway station, to escape the great heat at de Aar for a
11couple of months. Its much cooler here, & I'm able to work a little. I
12wonder if you are writing anything. Write & tell me about yourself &
13all the dear friends. You'd like this place, it's so peaceful. A
14little lonely - but all places in Africa are that. Just as in England
15one would be if one slipped out of the 20th century into the 17th.
16
17 We are just about 200 years behind the times, & as far as the natives
18& Indians go & our treatment of the them we are in the dark ages. Our
19"labour" members here (fine labour members!) have only one idea, to
20crush & keep down the native. They want to pass laws to prevent any
21coloured person from being allowed to do skilled labour, & they would
22like by law to limit their wages!!
23
24 How is dear Isabella Ford? And Bob? And George Adams? If the spirit
25ever moves me drop me a line. I have a little book on the woman
26question coming out soon. I'll send you a copy. It's nothing much &
27that terrible man Unwin is I believe going to bring it out from the
28rough proofs I sent without waiting for my corrections in which case
29it will be absolute nonsense!
30
31Send me anything you write.
32
33 I shall be here for a couple of months longer. I am boarding with the
34people of this farm; dear folk with three nice little children, but
35its a bit lonesome at times.
36
37 Yours ever
38 Olive
39
Notation
The 'little book' referred to is Woman and Labour.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/i
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 May 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 May 6th 1911
3
4 Dear Edward
5
6 Many years ago, I think it was in 92 or three 93 - just after I first
7came out to Africa I met a man in Cape Town. I only saw him for a few
8hours but he impressed me very much, he said he knew you & I think he
9said he knew Bob. He was a rather tall well built man, dark in the
10face something like myself if you imagine me a big man. I think he was
11a mining engineer, any how. He had come to Africa with the man who was
12with him to prospect or see about certain mines, I fancy in Wes
13German West Africa, but can't say just where. Emily ?Conebeare
14introduced him to me. He had some business connection with her brother
15he was interested in developing mines out here.
16
17 He spoke as if he knew you well. The curious thing is that I can't
18remember his name it was Lionel Brackenbury or Brailsford, or some
19such long double name with a B - I'm not even quite sure of the Lionel
20- Perhaps the name was Brackenborough. I'm not sure it began with a B
21but it had a B in it! You will will say "What ever to you want to know
22for?" - I can't say, but I'm always wondering what's become of him. A
23party of us went for a walk up the Devil's Peak & he & I dis-cussed
24socialism & other things He was rather short of speech & carcastic,
25but he wrote me a very nice little note before he left - I only saw
26him on that walk - the note ended "shall we ever meet again & where?"
27I have always expected to meet him but have never. There are three
28other people that haunt me in the same way, a French man I passed in
29the street in Paris, a beautiful prostitute who travelled in a bus
30with me in London, & fashionable little woman I once meet ^saw^ in a
31restaurant, but did not even speak to. In some subtle way all four
32have a connection with me mentally that I can't explain, I can never
33forget them. You will wonder I have forgotten his name - but I never
34think of people by their names. When I think of you I never think the
35word Edward Carpenter - I see your face. I always see things in
36pictures not words.
37
38 I
39
40 Good bye dear Edward. Try to remember that man I met & tell me whats
41become of him. His name might have been Crabenthorp I don't know if he
42was a very good & noble man, or the other way round, but it was to me
43like meeting some one who belonged to me I or whom I'd known in a
44pre-state of existence! It might be Bracksbury but I think it had a
45"brough" at the end. I think he was rather wicked but saw too little
46of him to say
47
48 Olive
49
Notation
An unknown hand has written 'Marshall Williams' in the margin next to Schreiner's description of the man she remembered meeting.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/j
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date4 July 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 302
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 July 4th 1911
3
4 Dear E.C.
5
6 I wrote you a longish letter to go off by this week's mail but I must
7have put it into an envelope addressed to some one else by mistake,
8for gone it is! Fortunately there was nothing it would matter any
9one's reading.
10
11 //Thank you for that interesting notice of the man, but he's not my
12man. He was quite the opposite type Tall, dark, powerfully built,
13rather reserved & sarcastic - fonder of asking questions than of
14giving answers - the man who might make a revolution - but would never
15talk of one! I think he was a mining engineer. He came out I believe
16to prospect some mine in or lands in the interests of a man called
17Conybeare, who used to be member of parliament.
18
19 Its long long years since I met him; it must have been in 1991 or 1992
20or at at very latest 1993.When I went to England in - 93 that time
21when Bob had just got engaged before I married my impression is that
22when I spoke of him to you & Bob you both said you knew him! We didn't
23say much about him, I just mentioned that I'd met him & he said he
24knew you, & you as though you knew him very well. He was the type of
25man who might have been a public school man & a University man. I
26think what attracted me to him was the sense of deep, restrained,
27passion. When I say his eyes were wicked - I mean that they were the
28eyes of a man who if he wanted anything very much would be driven by
29passion to strike down every thing that stood in his way
; & who could
30yet be very tender. We only spent one afternoon together up on the
31mountain side. He told Miss Conybeare he wanted to meet me & he & his
32friend were only in Cape Town for a few days, so she asked us all to
33go for this climb on the mountain, & we lay among the silver trees
34high up on the Devils Peak & talked. I had a curious feeling that
35there was a singularly close friendship between him & his little fair
36common place companion - a may man almost his own years age I
37should say he was then between 25 or or 28 so he must be far
38over 40 now.
39
40 It is very curious why I want to know if he's dead or what became of
41him! I always used to expect to hear of him turning up among the rich
42mining engineers at Johannesburg. But I don't know if he was a mining
43engineer or but it was my impression he was.
44
45 I spend my life so entirely alone now, most of it shut up in this room,
46 that my mind goes roving much over the past, & things & people I knew
47when I still lived among humanbeings seem so close & real to me.
48
49 I wonder if you & Bob have got the copies of Women & Labour I sent you
50yet? Its a curious idea of yours that Gibbon! of all people had
51anything to do with my view in the book. Its always seemed strange to
52me that Gibbon seems almost to ignore the existence of woman! &
53certainly never touches on any problem of sex.
54
55 Where he is valuable is in his dissection of the rise of Christianity
56but above all he, & he only, paints widely & clearly the causes which
57have led to the division of Europe into its present form of nations.
58Monson's Rome, now, teams with interesting information with regard to
59woman; & all the old Greek plays & Homer, & even dear old Heroditus
60pours light on the question of woman & her position in ancient times.
61
62 I am going to have a great pleasure tomorrow when Ida Hyett is coming
63to stay at the hotel for a week, & I shall see her every day. We are
64having the best weather of our year now beautifully cold & dry & the
65veld has quite a tinge of green after the late rains, so I hope she'll
66enjoy it. No one has ever been to see me here since Keir Hardie was
67here some years ago, so its a grand event.
68
69 My brother Will has gone to attend the Universal Races Congress in
70London, or rather sails tomorrow. I wonder if you'll be going & meet
71him there. He's a grand old fellow - his nature & sympathies deepening
72& widening so wonderfully as he grows older. He is also taking his son
73& daughter to Cambridge.
74
75 Good bye dear old Edward.
76
77 Thine ever
78 Olive
79
Notation
The book referred to is: Theodor Mommsen (1867-77) The History of Rome Leipzig: Reimer & Hirsel.. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/k
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 September 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 303
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 Sep 16th 1911
3
4 Ed dear,
5
6 I'm sending you another copy of my book. I think the mystery is solved
7as to what becomes of all the things I post.
8
9 I sent twelve copies of my book to England, & except Ellis & Alice
10Corthorn
no one seems to have got them. I sent one to Isabella Ford &
11one to Bob, but neither have written to say they'd got them. I sent a
12copy to General Hertzog too in this country which hes never got. I
13have been in despair & written to the general post office to complain.
14Now it appears (Cron has just found it out) that Cron's little office
15boy - who always takes the letters & parcels to the post has been
16robbing him right & left. He's taken money to the tune of 10 or 12
17pounds in small sums, & has made a system of selling the stamps in the
18post office. Cron says he has no doubt he has taken my parcels &
19letters for the sake of the stamps on them! I suppose he thought he
20wouldn't be found out if they were sent so far away as England. Please
21ask Isabella & Bob if they got their copies. I can't send them any
22more because all my copies are done.
23
24 I am working hard at my little garden. Gardening is such a passion
25with me. I've been reading a most fascinating book on Education in
26Greece boy ^by^ a young Cambridge man called Kenneth Freeman, who is
27dead. The Greeks were so wise in making the learning of poetry one of
28the great methods of educating young children.
29
30 I wish we had a library here. The kind of books I want to read are
31nearly always expensive books.
32
33 Good bye. Your old pal,
34 Olive
35
36 I wish you could see my little niece Ursula Schreiner who's just gone
37to Cambridge. She's such an interesting girl 19 years old. Ever since
38she was a little child she's had such a curious instinctive hatred of
39in-justice. The other day she got in a railway carriage & a poor
40shabby old man got in, & the guard bullied him most unjustly. She at
41once took up arms & wrote a letter to the paper to defend him. She's
42very reserved & one doesn't
43
44^get to know her soon - like the elder sister.^
45
Notation
'Another copy' refers to Woman and Labour. The book referred to is: Kenneth Freeman (1907) Schools of Hellas London: Macmillan. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/l
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 April 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 305
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 April 24th 1912
3
4 Dear Edward
5
6 I now & then hear a word of you from some one who has seen you & they
7say all seems going well.
8
9 We are having a real old De Aar sand storm at this moment, Great
10clouds of sand marching across the veld like armies & sweeping over us.
11 It is the afternoon, but the sand makes it so dark one can hardly see
12to write. My cat & two dogs have rushed in from the garden to take
13refuge in the house. Animals are still as much joy to me as ever, &
14reading. But perhaps the thing that gives me most pleasure in life is
15the thought of the new young girls growing up like my niece Lyndall so
16beautiful & free & strong; knowing nothing of all we have lived
17through. My niece is studying law for which she a great liking. She
18may never practice as a barrister if she marries or finds her work in
19politics; but she will, I hope, break the way through for other women
20to gain the freedom to practice if they will.
21
22 My sister Ettie who has practically been dying of heart disease for
23two years still lingers on, fighting bravely. For four months she has
24not been able to lie down, & has to have some one always to hold her
25up in bed. I have only seen one other such terrible struggle with
26death.
27
28 We have just got the full news of the loss of the Titanic, & dear old
29Stead's passing. You know I've never loved the sea as I have the land
30& the sky, the dear, wonderful sky.
31
32 Things are going very badly in our political world; the one little bit
33of brightness I see is that the natives are slowly awakening. But the
34white men are determined on a great native war.
35
36 Good bye. I love you dear old Edward
37 Olive
38
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/m
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 April 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 324-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 April 29 / 13
3 /13
4
5 My dear old Edward
6
7 I wonder how the world goes with you. I often wonder just what your
8feeling about the suffragettes is. Every year my horror not only of
9war, but of the argument of brute force all round grows stronger &
10stronger. If ever was the exercise of force was justified it is in the
11case of millions of women fighting from freedom. But is it ever
12justified - are not the evils greater than good? Cromwell, Washington
13all the worlds heroes who fought for freedom were they justified? I
14see so much to be said on both sides. Now I can only say I am for
15passive resistance, but I dare not condemn those who are not. Of
16course theres the narrow question of tactics - is it wise - even if
17right - at any given time to fight?
18
19 Things as far as the working classes in England go seem advancing
20quickly. But the fight for freedom will have to go on through the
21centuries, because as soon as one class or party or race becomes
22dominant it oppresses the others. Look at our Dutch here?? But one day,
23 far away I guess we shall come to a full bloom.
24
25 I've no news of myself to give your. We are still living in our little
26cottage in De Aar with the sand & deserts about us, all in the old way.
27 Cron thinks of going for a visit of some months to Europe this year,
28but I can't afford to. Perhaps he will see you if he comes. Its sad to
29think good old George Adams is gone.
30
31 Thin ever as of old
32 Olive
33
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/n
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 July 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 July 23rd 1913
3
4 Dear Edward
5
6 I am sending you an account of our Sundays meeting. If you want to
7understand the labour position out here read ?Balmsfords speech. If
8they shoot us down so the moment the white labourers strike, what will
9it be whenever the natives move: & we are bringing more & more
10oppressive laws against them. We have just passed a terrible native
11land bill - the worst bit of work we have done for years. I will try &
12send you a copy of my brothers speech in the senate on it. It is
13beautiful how liberal & broad & human he is growing as he grows older.
14I am perhaps coming to England in December on my way to Florence to
15try is a heart specialist there who has so greatly relieved my friend
16Emily Hobhouse can do anything for me. I shall be only two weeks or
17less in England as I can't stand the climate at thisof England in
18winter, but I do hope I'll see you, Edward. In the end I may not be
19well enough to leave; but it would be nice to see you all once more.
20
21 Good bye dear old Edward.
22 Thine ever
23 Olive
24
25 Do you ever see dear Isabella Ford? Send on the newspaper cutting I
26send to her. If they do have a general strike they are going to shoot
27us down all over the country, with their British troops & their
28"Defense Force" - "Citizens Destruction Force" - it is really.
29
Notation
The 'account of Sunday's meeting' is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/o
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 October 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 De Aar
2 Oct 26th 1913
3
4 Dear Edward,
5
6 Thank you for your letter. I sail from Africa on the 6th of Dec= in
7the Edinburgh Castle & arrive in England on Tuesday the 23rd just
8before Xmas. I am going to Alice Corthorns for the short time I am in
9England. Her address is
10
11 30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace
12 Kensington.
13 London W.
14
15 Pethick Lawrence has promised me that he or his wife will be in
16readiness to take me on to Italy as soon as I am able to be moved.
17Isn't it good of them? I do think I have the kindest & best friends in
18the world. It seems to me that no one has just such friends. I shall
19likely stay on the Riviera for some time till I get stronger, & go on
20to Florence to try the cure when it is a little warmer.
21
22 Botha, the Prime Minister here said the other day in a ^public^ speech,
23"Socialism will never enter South Africa"! Mrs Partington & her broom!?
24
25 Good bye, dear old Edward.
26 Olive
27
28 ^Remember me to Isabella Ford & Mat if you see them.^
29
30

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/p
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date18 February 1914
Address FromGrand Hotel, Alassio, Italy
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 330
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 Le Grand Hotel et d'Alassio
2 Alassio
3
4 Dear Ed
5
6 I feel I want to write to you this evening. I wonder what you think of
7our Cape affairs; what we are drifting towards is a military
8dictatorship. I always knew these things must come but I had hoped it
9would have taken longer.
10
11 Is your old friend "?Cholmundy" the man I saw at Millthorp who sang
12the Italian songs now in Italy with his wife? There was a man here the
13other night who looked exactly like him but he was gone the next
14morning. He has a long beard.
15
16 I shall leave for Florence at the end of this month. I shall of course
17not send your card to Herron as so soon after his wife's death he will
18not want to be troubled with strangers. I shall send the other card as
19I shall be glad to know some one in Florence. The two people I used to
20know are away now.
21
22 I've been ill in bed for some time with my old trouble stone in the
23kidney, but am quite better again. The people visiting in the hotel
24were most kind to me took it by turns to sit up with me at night & did
25all they could. Their kindness was most touching, especially when I
26think that a month ago I'd not seen one of them. I seem to have met
27with nothing but love & kindness since I landed in England.
28
29 I've got a curious shrinking from leaving this dear place & going to
30Florence. If I were superstitious I should think it boded some
31misfortune, but when one has these foreboding feelings they sometimes
32turn out nothing. It was grand to see dear old Bob again. You don't
33know what that little peep of you & him meant to me. He sweeter &
34finer than ever but not so strong. I think he works too hard at the
35kind of work that is not joy to him. He was never meant to be a mere
36teacher; but each of us must take life as it comes. Whan an almost
37terrible resignation one regards life with at last.
38
39 I have just finished reading the life of Lafcadio Hearn by Nina
40Kennard, its good but she doesn't understand him so well as you or I
41would. But you'll find it interesting if you've not read it. Some of
42the things written about him have been so full of lies - as all lives
43must be written of people whoby those who don't understand them. I
44suppose no man's life ever was or could be truly written except by God.
45
46 Good night, dear old Edward.
47
48 I wish you were coming to Florence too. Ellis said he'd come, but I
49don't know if he'll be able to. At first I have to go & stay at a
50horrid cold hotel the Hotel ?Pavle away at the top end of the Lungaro,
51but I'll only stay there for a week & try to find some more congenial
52place. One has to be on the Lungarno or some where one can get sun at
53this time of year.
54
55 My love to you.
56 Olive
57
58 ^Hasn't Edith Ellis developed so splendidly. She's finer than ever.^
59
60 ^Did I tell you I'd got a long letter from Ida Hyett.^
61
62
63
Notation
This letter is written on printed headed notepaper. The book referred to is Nina Kennard (1911) Lafcadio Hearn London: Nash. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of the letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/q
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 October 1914
Address FromDurrants Hotel, Manchester Square, Westminster, London
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 340-41
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
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The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front. The letter is written on printed headed notepaper which has been crossed through.
1 The Windsor
261 & 62 Lancaster Gate, W.
3
4 Durrants Hotel
5 Manchester Square
6 London W.
7
8 Dear old Edward
9
10 I think so much of your tired face as you went away. You know Edward
11can live through all this but its crushing us, who had such hopes for
12the future 20 years ago. If you come to London come & see me. We'll go
13on the top of the tram to Hampton Court & look at the pictures there.
14
15 My darling nephew Oliver Schreiner who was doing so brilliantly at
16Cambridge has become an English officer & joined his regiment so may
17be sent to the front at any moment guarding he is now in Kent guarding
18the coast.
19
20 In Africa things are very terrible. We shall bath the red sands of
21German West Africa with the best blood of our youth, going to rob it
22from the Germans who have never done anything to us. De Aar is the
23first big place toward German West Africa - if the Germans are driven
24to come into the Cape by our attacking them that is where the first
25big fighting will be. When I think of my husband my heart feels sore.
26
27 Good bye dear. Edward
28 Olive
29
30 I wish I could feel with you that this war is going to bring the
31kingdom of heaven. I feel it is the beginning of a half a century of
32the most awful wars the world has seen. First this - then another war
33of probably England & Germany against Russia, then as the years pass
34with India, Japan & China & the native races of Africa. While the
35desire to dominate, & rule & possess empire is in the hearts of men
36there will always be war.
37
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/ri
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date4 January 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Edward
5
6 Lady Low came to see me & I dined with her last night. I find her a
7most charming person with great gifts of mind & large gifts of heart.
8She knew & admired your sister so much. I am sending you a cutting
9from the Cape. The labour men there are standing out better than I had
10hoped. Cron is a member of the Labour Party. I am a member of nothing,
11I keep free. I am writing an article on war (enclosed).
12
13 I hope I shall meet Jean Langent the French socialist when th he comes
14over to that International meeting of socialists here this week.
15
16 Love to you
17 Olive
18
Notation
The 'article on war' which Schreiner enclosed cannot be established, but could have been one of her war-time short articles/open letters or else one of her anti-war allegories.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/rii
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateJanuary 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 346
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand and it is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 My dear old Edward
5
6 I think you think I am a horrid person, but you know its just because
7you've always been to me so exhalt, so far above all national & class
8prejudice that it almost stunned me to believe you approved of the war.
9 I don't care a bit what ordinary people think & feel. I have not
10exchanged one word on the way with a living human being for three
11months, except you, & Isabella Ford - who being a quaker of course is
12against it. I suppose it's because I've lived through a great war, &
13seen that the evils that result from it & follow it are infinitely
14greater than the war itself. The militarism, the spirit of hate &
15inhumanity which affects all people who have lived through a war, are
16much worse than the fighting & dying.
17
18 South Africa is again bathed in blood - the hatred of course has never
19died - which was left by the war of ten years ago. Love begets love, &
20hate & war beget hate & war as surely as black men beget black
21children & white men white. For a time there may be no actual war; but
22it will begin again when the seed has had time to grow. I'm going up
23to Hampstead on the 11th of Jan. till then I shall be here. My address
24at Hampstead will be 15 Carlingford Road Hampstead Heath. I shall not
25be quite so lonely there as I am here as dear little Dollie Radford
26lives there & I can sometimes go to see her. I haven't known a person
27be as lonely as I am in England now. In the Boer war many liberals &
28working men were opposed to war; but now we are but a tiny handful. In
29four years time - when the pay day comes we shall be a multitude -
30what will that help!
31
32 Now I'll never never talk about the war to you again, if you'll only
33come & see me when you come to town. What a dear man that George was
34who came with you. Give him my love & give it to Ida Hyett when you
35see her.
36
37 Yours with a lot of love
38 Olive
39
40
41
Notation
Edward Carpenter has written onto this letter 'I didn't approve of the war! but we couldn't help it.' Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of the letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/s
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday February 1916
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been derived from the postmark on an attached envelope, although this is not fully legible; the envelope also provides the address the letter was sent to.
1 30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace
2 Monday
3
4 My dear Edward
5
6 I'm writing to you just to give myself a little pleasure. It was so
7fine seeing you.
8
9 I'm writing a little tiny thing for the Labour Leader. Whether they
10put it in or not, I'll send it you; I know you'll understand. I call
11it "A few words to the young men of the No-Conscription Fellowship".
12They are having a fine chance to testify to the sense of unity which
13ought to bind all humanbeings. I've seen Lady Low since I saw you: I
14grow near her & nearer her in feeling. She & Lilly Batthyiny are the
15two best friends I have now, & you introduced me to both of them.
16
17 I am feeling anxious about America. Not just now but bye & bye there
18will be a great war between her & England.
19
20 I saw my brother Will on Sunday so I have had quite an exciting week
21seeing two people. He spoke with great admiration of you & said he
22would like to see you if you came to Town again.
23
24 There has been no steamer from Africa for the last 11 days, & I feel
25anxious when such a long time passes without any news from my husband.
26
27 Good bye.
28 Olive
29
Notation
The 'little thing' Schreiner was writing is 'On "conscientious objectors"' Labour Leader 16 March 1916 (see also Appendix H, (ed) S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) The Letters of Olive Schreiner London: Fisher Unwin).

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/t
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 13 March 1916
Address FromAlexi, The Park, Hampstead, London
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 Alexi
2 31 The Park
3 Hampstead
4 Saturday
5
6 Dear EC
7
8 You will see from the above where I am staying in our dear friends
9house while they are away. Its so beautiful & peaceful here, like
10Heaven! Don't forget I'm here if you come to town. Lloyd came to see
11me the other evening, & he's going to bring his woman friend to see me
12& play Beethoven to me one evening. I never forget how beautifully you
13& Kate Salt played together at Millthorpe. Give my love to Kate, &
14tell her where I am in case she comes to Town & come & see me.
15
16 I've written a little thing on Conscription which is coming out in the
17Labour Leader I think. I see Portugal is joining in, & America will
18join in presently. I'm getting stiffened out with this war. I knew it
19would be Hell when it started. But I really didn't think it was going
20to be like this. The beloved Lilly has let me use her bedroom, & your
21picture hangs at the head of the bed. I'm going to lunch with dear
22Lady Low tomorrow. Don't you think there's a little likeness between
23her & Lilly? They might be sisters. I like them better than any new
24people I've met since I came to England.
25
26 Much love
27from Olive
28
29 Its rather terrible the way they bully these poor conscientious
30objectors. As soon as I'm better I'm going to go & watch the cases. I
31suppose you are busy in your part of the world. Remember you we are
32fighting for Freedom, & small peoples, & against militaryism & this is
33what we ?we got.
34
Notation
The 'little thing' Schreiner had written is 'On "conscientious objectors"' Labour Leader 16 March 1916 (see also Appendix H, (ed) S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) The Letters of Olive Schreiner London: Fisher Unwin).

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Edward Carpenter SMD 30/32/u
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 March 1916
Address FromAlexi, The Park, Hampstead, London
Address ToMillthorpe, Holmesfield, Sheffield
Who ToEdward Carpenter
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 Alexi
2 Hampstead
3 March 16th 1916
4
5 Dear Edward
6
7 It was nice to get your letter. Oh it is so good being here. I wrote
8another little thing called "Give unto Caesar" - which is coming out
9in the Peace & War. I am going to try & go on with the little book I
10began writing in Wales but I have not been able to touch since.
11
12 Have you heard that poor Edith Ellis is so ill; a nervous & mental
13breakdown. I got a very sad letter from Havelock. I have always feared
14this for her. It is the worst of all the troubles that can come in
15life.
16
17 I will send you a copy of Peace & War if you don't take it. Its only a
18tiny thing I've written a few lines. I should be so happy if I could
19get my little book finished. There are things you feel you must say.
20
21 Yes Lilly Batthyany is a beloved soul & I am so fond of her son Jack
22who is spending a few days here. He's going to a farm in Hampshire.
23
24 The worst of publishing things in these little socialist & other
25papers is that the people you want to see them don't see them it's
26only the already converted, & papers like the Nation & the Statesman
27are afraid to take them!
28
29 Good bye dear Edward.
30
31 How finely Liebknicht & some of the Germans are standing out. There's
32a little handful of us in all nations.
33
34 Olive
35
Notation
The 'little thing' called 'Give unto Caesar' is: "Give Unto Caesar -" War & Peace vol 3, no 31, April 1916, p.106. The 'little book' that Schreiner began in Wales is the never completed 'The Dawn of Civilization'.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1884 ; Before End: 1889
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This page, probably once attached to a letter, has no associated envelope or other means of dating it except that the writing seems to belong to Schreiner's mid-life.
1 1
2 8 Far away, where the tempest plays,
3 6 Over the dreary seas,
4 7 Sail on still with a steady will,
5 6 On-ward before the breeze.
6
7 2
8 9 On, onwards yet, still our hearts forget
9 7 The loves that we leave behind,
10 11 Till the memories dear ^that^ thrill in our ear
11 7 Flew past like the whistling wind.
12
13 3
14 7 Let them come, sweet thoughts of home
15 7 And voices we loved of old;
16 7 What care we that sail a sea
17 7 And bound for a land of gold!
18
19 4
20 10 Treasures there are that are lovelier far
21 8 Than the flash of a maiden's eye;
22 8 Jewels bright in the purple light
23 8 That crimsons the evening sky.
24
25 5
26 9 Crowns that gleam like a fairy dream,
27 6 Treasures of price untold -
28 9 And we are bound of that charméd ground
29 7 8 We sail for the land of gold.
30
31 I have written it out for you but it seems to be a funny irregular
32meter that no one could sing. I'm not sure at all that it is as it was
33in the book where I read it, I was such a little child & I may have
34made additions of my own. I'm so fond of it. Be sure you notice the
35accent over the "charmed"
36
37 O.S
38
39
40
41
Notation
The verse Schreiner quotes is W.E. Littlewood's poem 'The Land of Gold'.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/2
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 November 1880
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToLady Superintendent of Nurses, Edinburgh Royal Infirmary, but sent to Havelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner provided Havelock Ellis at an unknown date with her application to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. It is not known how this typescript of the application form came to be made; however, the original form was sent to Schreiner?s friend Dr John Brown in Burnley, who sent it on to the ERI, so the typescript is likely to predate her friendship with Ellis.
1 Edinburgh Royal Infirmary 25-11-80
2
3 N.B. This paper to be filled in (in the Candidate's own handwriting)
4and sent to the Lady Superintendent of Nurses, Edinburgh Royal
5Infirmary.
6
7 Questions to be answered by Candidate
8
9 1. Name in full and present address of Candidate.
10^Olive Emelie Albertina Schreiner
11Lily Kloof, Cradock, Cape of Good Hope.^
12
13 2. Are you a single woman or widow *The marriage certificate will be
14required.
15 ^Single^
16
17 3. Your present occupation of employment, also, if a widow, the former
18occupation of your husband
19 ^Governess.^
20
21 4. Age last birthday, and date and place of birth.
22 ^25. Born at Wittersberg, South Africa, March 24th. 1855.^
23
24 5. Height?
25 ^Five feet.^
26 Weight?
27 ^There are no scales here. Weight, probably about 110.^
28
29 6. Where educated?
30 ^At home.^
31
32 7. Of what religious denomination? Name and address of Clergyman or
33Minister who knows you.
34 ^Free thinker. Father, Lutheran. Rev. W. Caldecott, East London, South
35Africa.^
36
37 8. Can you read and write well?
38 ^Yes.^
39
40 9. Are you strong and healthy? and have you always been so.
41 ^Yes. Was delicate at one time, but have wholly recovered.^
42
43 10. If a widow, have you children? How many? Their ages. How are they
44provided for?
45
46 11. Where (if any) was your last situation? How long were you in it.
47 ^Ratelhoek. Dis. Tarkastad. Three years.^
48
49 12. What is the name and occupation of your father, or, if not living,
50your mother.
51 ^Father - Lutheran Missionary - dead. Mother, living on her income.
52Grahamstown, South Africa.^
53
54 13. The names in full, and address of two persons to be referred to?
55State how long each has known you. If previously employed, one of
56these must be the last employer.
57 ^Dr. ?H. Pearson, Seymour, South Africa. Has known me 5 years
58 Christoffel Christian Fouche, Esq., Lily Kloof, Cradock, South Africa.
59has known me 8 years.^
60
61 14. Name and address of your Medical attendant.
62 ^I have none.^
63
64 15. Have you read, and do you clearly understand the regulations.
65 ^yes^
66
67 I declare the above statement to be correct.
68 Date ^Lily Kloof, Nov. 25th. 1880.^
69 Signed ^Olive Emilie ^^Albertina^^ Schreiner^ Candidate.
70
71
72
Notation
Schreiner's responses to the questions asked on the form from the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary strain at the boundaries of 'letterness', but are included for the sake of completeness.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/3
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 12 December 1885
Address From9 Blandford Square, Paddington, London
Address To3 Norwood Villas, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 88
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front. Schreiner was resident in Blandford Square from the end of November 1885 to mid January 1886, when she left London for the Isle of Wight.
1 Friday night
2
3 I feel so tired to night. Have been crying I thought I'd forgotten how
4to cry.
5
6 Good night my comfort
7
8 Olive
9
10 I shall come to New Life. It would be nice if Page could come.
11
12 O.S
13
14
Notation
This letter is written in the margins of a letter from Havelock Ellis, as follows:

My dear Miss Schreiner

Mr Malloy unreadable asked me to forward you / enclosed card. I am going & Miss ?C. Haddon & Mrs ?Castlebury are to be there. She has a flat near the B. Museum. If you thought of going I would arrange to meet you, we could call for you or we could drive there together. I think you do not patronise unreadable at that ?corner omnibuses are very empty, & Bayswater ones are very nice. They leave for town at unreadable street from which Gt. Ormond St. is only a few minutes walk.

Will you come to / theatre some night next week? Send me a card soon.

Yours ever truly
& affectionately.

27 Perham Road
S.W.
Dec. 10

Do not put West Kensington on yr letter - S.W. is unreadable & safer from unreadable post.

The version of Schreiner's letter in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/5
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date30 June 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 June 30th 1912
3
4 Dear old Boy
5
6 Thanks for your letter. Of course each person's "diary works" (I mean
7simple, spontaneous, straight forward records of what one sees, feels,
8& does & thinks) will differ with the individuality of the person. The
9charm is that it is an expression of their individuality. A guide book
10has no charm because it expresses no individuality it is just a
11collection of facts. If Barrow writes a book the thing his
12individuality notes are names of mountains & rivers, language, words,
13also gypsies, tramps thieves & scenery to a small extent, with a word
14picture of his mind thought & feeling. When Darwin writes he notes all
15plants, animals, scientific speculation turn up in his mind at every
16moment, nature impresses him with great cosmic feelings: his books are
17greater than Barrow's because a greater soul - but Barrow's also have
18their value & charm.
19
20 You could write a book most engaging & splendid if you wrote more as
21you write letters & more spontaneously. Any one of your letters to me
22where you've told me just a little about your travels in Spain say, is
23worth the whole of your book. The letters live, the book seems
24artificial. You express in the book what you've really seen & thought
25but in a stiff artificial manner. There is not enough of yourself in
26all of your later writing
. If I were very ill & you knew that my life
27depended on q my being amused & interest, & to help me you wrote an
28account of your a fortnight spent in Paris, just who you saw where you
29went & felt interest, what you felt about your food & your room: & how
30the pictures impressed you, it would no doubt splendid. Your short
31hurried letters ^even^ are 100 times more interesting than your books.
32
33 I could write the most marvelous books in that way, compared to which
34all my other books are nothing. I do see the actual world about me so
35intensely the men & women I meet print themselves on me, agonize me if
36they are antipathetic, give me bliss if there are beautiful.
37
38 The sc atmospheric effects of every day I note intensely the changes
39in the sky the weather the scene: all nature is immensely important.
40My feeling to this awful sandy desert, the strange passionate love I
41feel for the pepper-trees I have planted, & especially one rose bush
42that I nurture & care for before my door. My difficulty is that I dare
43not write the truth! I would be so afraid of paining human beings.
44Character! character! character! is what cuts deep into me. The
45character people I meet on the train, of the people living in de Aar,
46of my different servants - I could write books about them alone - &
47most easily. But dare I, with my terror of inflicting pain? - I can't,
48that's why I can't write my life! My
49
50 You
51
52 You who are not so terribly moved by all persons you come into contact
53with - could write much more easily just what you feel & think about
54the things you see. Of course you do lack descriptive power with
55regard to material things. I doubt whether in a few lines you could
56make me see an old ruin on a hill as Barrow does so that I actually
57see it. He was of course born the artist. - that is what the matter
58with him - unlovable, in many respects an ignorant & narrow man - he
59was an artist
! The few right words in which to pain a thing he saw
60always came to him, because he saw so clearly & intensely. Life was
61always shaping itself into pictures to him. But you could write most
62valuable books if they were more like your letters. There are such
63wonderful little touches - so often in your conversation - now & then
64in your letters, in which you throw a whole world into a short
65critical or descriptive sentence - t as where you once said of Karl
66Pearson's
wife when you first met her that she seemed a good sort of
67woman, "but the kind of person who would finish off a man!" C I can't
68write more now.
69
70 Cron is still away at the Victoria Falls. He returns the middle of
71this week. The weather is a little better, the sunshine through my
72window is dancing on the sheet as I write.
73
74 Things in South Africa grow darker & darker. Sauer & Burton the two
75only liberal men on the native question have been turned out of their
76offices in the ministry, & the most bigoted, narrow native hater in
77South Africa Hertzog put in as minister of native affairs. There are
78terrible things coming soon
79
80^in this poor accursed land. We have also passed a bill for forced
81conscription.
82
83Olive^
84
85
Notation
The books referred to are: George Borrow (1857) The Romany Rye London: John Murray and (1851) Lavengro: The Scholar Gypsy London: John Murray.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/6
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 16 July 1884
Address FromBole Hill, Wirksworth
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 31-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter has been derived from the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 Bole Hill
2 Wirksworth
3 Wednesday
4
5 Thank you for the Law Breaker. Can I keep that article of yours till
6you come because I want us to talk over it? I will send it if you want
7it, but you must bring it with you when you come. I want you when you
8come here to go for some very long walks alone. I think it will rest
9you so. I am so thankful you can stay a fortnight.
10
11 Speaking of the effect sexual feeling has on the mind, it is very
12clearly proved in the case of women. I must make more inquiries among
13other women, my friends who will have noticed & been able to analyze
14their feelings. With myself while I am unwell every month my feelings
15are particularly sensitive & strong. A little word that would not pain
16me at another time causes me acute agony. I can not help feeling, & a
17little word of tenderness is so precious to me (Especially the man who
18loves you ought to be tender with you then). The time of greatest &
19most wonderful mental activity is just after, & perhaps the last two
20days of the time ^too^. My mind is a I was unwell last week; & though
21now my chest is so unreadable troublesome I can be on the sofa half
22asleep, & the thoughts are all continually to crowding in on me
23unreadable. Last night it suddenly flashed into me, the unreadable ^solution^
24of all my difficulties with "From man to man". It has been brooding in
25the back ground of my mind these many days, & now it has suddenly come.
26 I shall have no more difficulty with it, it is as clear as day light.
27I have got what I wanted. It is so splendid, I mean this feeling is, I
28get so excited I don't know what to do.
29
30 But to go back to the sexual feeling. Of course one may easily
31exaggerate what I have been talking about, but there is no doubt there
32is some truth in it. Eleanor Marx the only woman I have spoken to on
33the subject feels much the same. My acquisitive power, my power of
34learning, is not at all weaker just at the time, but my feelings are
35so strong. Ask Louie how she feels. I am going to ask Mrs Walter &
36some of my intimate friends. This subject in interesting, because as
37far as the power of the purely physical-sexual extends, so far must
38the power of ?bra the mental-sexual extend
. If the physical
39feelings extend their power over a certain portion of the soul, then
40the relationship between man & woman will be able to work upon the
41same portion. Do you carefully observe (I mean un consciously, I
42always look at it myself unconsciously ^don't you?^) the ?rebel
43interaction of your manly upon your mental nature.
44
45 I should like to know the man's side of the question too. I should
46think the relationship must be always ^almost^ as close. Look at the
47effect of celibacy on monks & hermits, &c.
48
49 Yes, you must never look any one in the face, ah? I wouldn't
50understand it ^at first^. I think what I called that glorious look in
51eye in your eyes was just the once or twice when you looked really
52into mine. They were godlike. What is rather funny is that some years
53ago I never looked at anyone in the eyes; I couldn't. I had a cousin
54who used to hate me & wasn't kind to me, & she used to say that I
55never looked at anyone, & that that was why she couldn't bear me. I
56wonder if you will change like I have, & look people full in the face
57like I do now. And I used to be so reserved, & secretive without any
58reason for it; I'm not like that now.
59
60 If I talked to any one I used to turn my face half away from them. I
61couldn't help it. I'm glad you turn away your face from people &
62
63^look down I don't think you will always.
64
65I should like to send you some day some letters of my mother's to read.
66 My grandfather's name was Lyndall. I think I told you about him
67though I've written to my mother to ask her about the Olivers. I
68should like to have your blood in me, shouldn't you like to have mine.
69
70I liked Under the Greenwood Tree. Tell me all you can about Hardy.
71
72Good bye, my boy-brother.
73
74Olive^
75
76^Is the London Review published in India?^
77
Notation
The final insertion is on the envelope. The books referred to are: James Hinton The Law Breaker and The Coming of the Law (ed. M. Hinton) London: Kegan Paul & Co; Thomas Hardy (1872) Under the Greenwood Tree London: Tinsley Brothers. Schreiner's request to keep an article by Ellis may refer to: Havelock Ellis (1883) 'Thomas Hardy's Novels' Westminster Review no.119: 334-64. The version of this letter in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/7
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 19 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 33; Rive 1987: 47
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1885, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1 Friday
2
3 I thought I shouldn't to write to you today, but I find a kind of need.
4
5 Did you ever read that passage in Shelly's letters where he talks
6about genius (I think he repeats it from another book.) that Genius
7does not invent, it perceives
. I think that ^this^ is so won-derfully
8true & more true the more one looks at it. It agrees with the true
9fact that you noticed the other day, that men of genius are always
10childlike. A child sees everything, looks straight at it, examines it
11without any preconceived idea; most people after they are about eleven
12or twelve quiet lose this power, they see everything through a few
13pre-conceived ideas which hang like a veil between them & the outer
14world.
15
16 By the bye (this doesn't bear directly on that) did you ever do what I
17was fond of doing when I was a child, I used to call it "Looking at
18things really"? Look at your hand, for instance, make an effort of
19mind, & dis-associate from it every preconceived idea, for instance
20that it is your hand, that it is part of a human body, &c &c. Look at
21it simply as an object which strikes the eye; you will be surprised
22who how new, & strange, & funny it looks, as though you had never seen
23it before. It requires some effort of mind of course, & one can't do
24it if one is hurried & talking, it takes some time. I used to do it
25often in church to pass away the time. It can be done with the other
26senses too, of course. I have often done it with speaking. Listen to
27people talking as though you didn't understand what the words meant, &
28didn't
or that the sound came from human voices. Listen to it just as
29a noise striking the ear. It is utterly different from what one
30fancies. This isn't very interesting though.
31
32 I have been reading my Emerson just now. You will do me great service
33if you help me to read French, it will open a whole new field of books
34to me.
35
36 Tomorrow at twelve I must walk down to Wirksworth to meet Mrs Walter
37at 1.We shall talk a great deal about Hinton. I mean to try & explain
38Hinton to her & make her ^understand him^. I don't think she sees him
39rightly. I will tell you what she says & ^what^ I say about it. How
40beautiful about your visit to Shields.
41
Notation
For Shelley's letters, see Percy Bysshe Shelley (1840) Essays, Letters From Abroad, Translations and Fragments London: Edward Moxon. Rive's version of this letter has been misdated, omits part of the letter, and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/8
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date14 May 1886
Address FromSt Dominic?s Convent, Mutrix Road, Kilburn
Address To98 Earlsbrook Road, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 98-9; Rive 1987: 79
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front. Schreiner lived at St Dominic's Convent in Kilburn from early April to mid May 1886.
1 My Harry
2
3 I am going to go tomorrow to the Academy for a couple of hours. On Sat
4morning I leave for Harrow. Address will just be
5 Convent
6 Harrow-on-the-Hill
7 Nr. London.
8
9 I don't quite know what's the matter with me, I'm so much knocked down.
10 Will my book ever ever ever be done? One thing every word of it is
11truth to me, & more & more so as the book goes not. It could not be
12otherwise that is all that can be said for it. One thing I am glad of
13is that it becomes less & less what you call "art" as it goes on. My
14first crude conceptions are always what you call "art", as they become
15more & more living & real they become what I call higher art, but what
16you call no "art" at all. I quite understand what you mean but I
17cannot think that your use of the word "art" in that sense is right i.e.
18not misleading & therefore untrue. If I understand what you mean
19Wilhelm Meister is not art, ^one of^ Balzac's conser novels is.
20Wilhelm Meister is one of the most immortal deathless ?action production
21of the greatest of the world's artists, the result of twenty years
22labour, worth any six of Balzacs. novels, great & glorious as Balzac
23is; yet if you were writing a review of it you would, ridiculous as it
24would seem, be obliged to call it "not art".
25
26 You say, "I will call art, only that artistic creation in which I can
27clearly see the artist manufacturing the parts & piecing them together;
28 what ever where I cannot see that, though the thing be organic, true
29inevitable like a work of God's, I will not call it art. I must see
30the will shaping it: (of course there always has been a will shaping
31it whether it is visible or not) or I will not call it art.
32
33 ^This of course is not in justification of my method, but touches what
34seems to me a weakness or shallowness in your mode of criticism. It is
35very valuable that the two kinds of art should be distinguished but
36not that the one should be called art & the other not art. Of the two
37it would be better to call the one artificial art & the other real art
38- but that would not be just. I should rather call the one organic,
39the other inorganic, of the one you think of as a thing made, the
40other as a thing that grew.^
41
Notation
Schreiner's 'Will my book ever ever ever be done?' commenty concerns From Man to Man. The Goethe book referred to is: Johan Wolfgang von Goethe (1871) Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship London: Chapman & Hall. Rive's version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/9
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 May 1886
Address FromThe Convent, Harrow, London
Address To98 Earlsbrook Road, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 101
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front. The final insertion is on the envelope. Schreiner lived at the Convent in Harrow from late May to late September 1886.
1 Havelock
2
3 I've just come back from seeing M. Harkness. Oh, the joy to get back &
4here again. I could have cried for joy when I got out here at the
5station & walked up the hill. I don't know how it is I have been able
6to live among the rush so long; a little more & I should have broken
7forever. Oh this blessed, blessed solitude ^& stillness.^
8
9 My darling boy, I wish I could help you. If I had not my work I could
10be like I was. What you, & my brother & Mrs Walters & Mrs Brown sy &
11Dr Donkin ^& K Pearson, & my Mother,^ say, "You are changed, you are
12changed," means simply that I am not living in the world that
13surrounds me but in my work. You can't understand & there is no use in
14my saying anything on the matter ever to you. K Pearson has written me
15such a pained letter, because I said I didn't want to answer his
16letters. Sometime I feel inclined to swear a big oath, & throw all my
17M.SS in the fire, & say "Here I am, I shall live as I have lived the
18last three years, never in my work, never conscious of myself, but
19through & in the people I love." My heart is sore sorrowful about it.
20And what after all is my work worth that I should sacrifice every
21thing to it, that I should torture myself like this.
22
23 I won't say any more on this subject again to you or any no one. Good
24bye, my own darling. I wish I were dead. But tomorrow I will forget
25all of you, even my brother, & work. I wish I could help you my
26darling.
27
28 Oh am I right in trying to get back into my old state & work. Deep in
29my heart I feel that I am, but doubts will come sometimes & I hate
30myself so I wish I was dead. I wish so you would come & see me here.
31This is such a beautiful place. I wish you would come some day about 3
32o'clock. You have been more help to me than you can ever know my
33Havelock.
34
35 Olive
36
37 ^My darling Havelock I do love you. Can't you believe it?^
38
39 ^This letter isn't nice but I'm so worn. This morning my brother writes
40that as he knows I won't take the trouble to answer him he sends a
41card with his address on which I can return to let him know I've got
42his letter. I'm writing to Miss Haddon to tell her I can't come she
43would only say I was changed.^
44
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner?s (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/10
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 21 September 1886
Address FromThe Convent, Harrow
Address To98 Earlsbrook Road, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 The Convent
2 Harrow
3 Monday night
4
5 I am looking out for a word from you. I've been out to the post today
6& feel better. I mean to set my teeth & work tomorrow. I must at least
7finish Jan van der Linden's wife if I don't finish anything else. I am
8going into Town as soon as I am able to see if I can find cheap
9lodgings anywhere. I mean to try round Manchester Square.
10
11 If I finish Jan & get £5 for it I'll come in. I love the story. I
12haven't written it the least bit for money other wise I couldn't sell
13it. Has Chapman paid you yet? I am quite sure he never will.
14
15 I have just heard of a new villany of Aveling. He did poor Mrs
16?Guiggenberger out of £10 or so, & she is very poor. He & my Chapman
17are just of the same kind. I think there are many capitalist sweaters
18who are not so bad because they do it unconsciously.
19
20 Good night my comrade
21 Olive
22
Notation
The 'Jan' which Schreiner writes about finishing is the never completed or else destroyed 'Jan van der Linden's Wife'.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/11
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 November 1888
Address FromAlassio, Italy
Address To98 Earlsbrook Road, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 145-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 Alassio
2 Italy
3 Nov 3 / 1888
4
5 Please put 3/- of stamps in the enclosed letter & post it. Wilde only
6sent me one copy of W's W.
7
8 I long to be at my story making. It's a glorious day here after the
9pouring rain of yesterday.
10
11 I'm not like old Tolstoy!!! Everything he teaches according to PMG is
12what I believe. His falseness lies in this, instead of saying simply
13"I see these things as truth," he wants to force them into the world
14under the old name of Christ. ^If^ Wwhat Jesus saw was truth, & in so
15far as it was every ^one^ who pierces as deeply into the laws of human
16nature & life as he did will find again.
17
18 Be Neither Christ on Tolstoy nor any one of us now living has yet seen
19& preached that doctrine of love & forgiveness as it will be preached
20in ages to come.
21
22O.S
23
24^It is the true light that lighteth every man that cometh into the
25world. You have never understood the strife & agony of these last
26years, it has not been to forgive, it has not been magnanimously to
27over look that is easy enough It is to love. If there be one soul you
28cannot love then you are lost.^
29
30^Please buy & send me a bible, as like my old one in size & print as
31you can. Its was one of those cheap bibles published by the ^British &^
32Foreign Bible Society. Not with the very fine print.^
33
34I am always quoting from the bible sometimes for the devil's own
35purposes & I find as the years pass my memory sometimes wavers with
36regard to an exact ^wording of a^ passage.
37
38 O.S
39
Notation
The final insertion is on a torn-off attached fragment of paper. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/12
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date18 October 1886
Address From9 Blandford Square, Paddington, London
Address To98 Earlsbrook Road, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been derived from the postmark on an attached envelope, although this is not fully legible; the envelope also provides the address the letter was sent to. The Howard Hinton bigamy trial in which Mrs Weldon was correspondent took place in late October 1886, providing the year the letter was written. Schreiner was resident in Blandford Square from early October to mid December 1886, when she left London for Europe.
1 This trial affair is so terrible; they are all so false. What a
2terrible deadly thing that Hinton theory is, like a ?upas tree
3blighting all it comes in contact with because it is false to human
4nature.
5
6 I saw John Falk on Friday. I am going to get Mrs Weldon to stay here
7till the trial & I am going to to sit with her at hi it.
8
9 Do you know I can't help hating Mrs Howard Hinton. She is the only one
10I can't feel sorry for. Poor Howard looked so beautiful when he went
11into the prisoner's dock. They say he will likely only get a few days
12-& then
13
14^I can't think about anything else.
15
16 Olive^
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/13
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 April 1889
Address FromParis
Address To98 Earlsbrook Road, Earlswood, Surrey
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 160-1; Rive 1987: 154
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on the front.
1 Paris
2
3 You quite intentionally misunderstand me in every thing, or, sometimes
4I think are we grown so wide apart that no understanding is possible
5between us. As the strongest personal feelings my nature has known are
6gloriously "funny" & "absurd" to you, & my ideas, which after all are
7my real life dearer much to me than any person or than my self simply
8bore you, so even such a common place remark as that in my letter to
9my brother you willfully misunderstand or can't understand. No human
10creature's ^feel feelings^ could possibly be further ^removed^ with
11respect to my artistic work - not of course the scientific - than mine
12from George Elliots. Her great desire was to teach, mine to express my
13self for my self & to my self alone The thought that hundreds of
14thousands will read my work does offend me & hinder me, not because I
15wish to teach them, but because terrible as it is to show them my work
16at all, the thought of throwing it to them to be trodden under foot is
17double desecrating of it. I'm almost beginning to hate my Prelude now
18because three or four people have looked at it. & if many more do I
19shall throw it into the fire. If you sermonized me on the wickedness
20of not caring & sharing my work with other people, you would be much
21nearer the truth.
22
23 The best stories & dreams I have had nothing would induce me to write
24at all because I couldn't bear one person to read them. As for its
25being a new development its a feeling that's rather growing weaker,
26because as a child if Will or anyone got hold of a scrap I'd written I
27tore up the whole thing at once. It was like a knife in my heart
28to-day when I saw an African Farm stuck up in a window. I get to loath
29it when I think of how many people have read it. Do you think I could
30write Bertie's death scene, do you think I could show all the inmost
31working of Rebekah's heart if, I realized that anyone would ever read it.
32
33 If God were to put me alone on a star & say I & the star should be
34born up at last & nothing be left, I should make stories all the time
35just the same. Its not that I want my story to be worthy of the people,
36 but that I can't bear to desecrate the thing I love by showing it to
37them in a form they can't understand. I can't tell you how sorry I am
38I showed a Ruined Chapel to any one; it's so beautiful to me & no one
39understands it. ^I'm going to print a little allegory in next
40Fortnightly. But I don't want to hear what ^^any^^ one thinks of it. I
41know what I know.^
42
43 //I am wonderfully better since I have made up my mind to come to
44England. It was that, I feel now; that I was really wanting: & the
45strain of resisting it that made me so tired.
46
47 I go to the ?Valls every day. I'm quite "the oldest inhabitant". Nelly
48Pruse
is lovely. After Alice Corthorn she's the most "native to me"
49girl I know. She's very like Alice, only she's artistic instead of
50scientific. When I'm in England I'm going to write her to come & stay
51with me, & you'll see how nice she is. I've not quite made up my mind
52about hospital. ^I'll see when I come.^
53
54 //No, I'm not going to buy shoes & stockings. I've plenty with those
55two pairs & I've had mine my old boots resoled. There's not any hurry
56with the other money. A I've plenty now. It rains here every day. I've
57been once to the Louvre but not anywhere else.
58
59 Goodbye.
60 Olive
61
62 I've got a letter ^from Mrs Cobb^
63
64 ^Allice will send you Mrs Robert's letter. I'll leave this open till
65tomorrow so that I can put Mrs Rob Roberts's answer in, as to whether
66he has the rooms or not.^
67
Notation
The 'Prelude' that Schreiner refers to is in From Man to Man and Bertie and Rebekah are characters in this novel. The 'little allegory' was in fact not published in the Fortnightly Review because of its length. See "The sunlight lay across my bed: Part I - Hell" New Review Vol 1, no 11, April 1890, pp.300-309; and "The sunlight lay across my bed: Part II - Heaven", New Review Vol 1, no 12, May 1890, pp.423-431. "In a Ruined Chapel" was published in Dreams. Rive's version of this letter has been misdated, omits part of the letter, and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/14
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 11 September 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToThe Old House, Speen, Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 338
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace
2 Kensington
3 Friday
4
5 Dear old Havelock
6
7 I went to Eastbourne yesterday. It was too sad.
8
9 I came back in the evening. All the ghosts of my dead youth sat about
10me. The grave is on a Hill side from the town.
11
12 I am going down to Margate & Ramsgate tomorrow to try & find a room
13there.
14
15 It seems they are going to begin attacking the Germans in South Africa,
16 the farmers who have never done anything to us, who were so kind to
17our prisoners when they escaped to Germany. There seems to me to be no
18gratitude in the world; no remembrance of the past.
19
20 I may yet get my little flat in Chelsea but it can't be for two weeks.
21
22 I hope Edith is better.
23
24 Olive
25
26 ^Do you see the Labour Leader? Its the only paper that is standing out
27The other papers all refused to take Vernon Lee's & Bertrand Russels
28articles.
29
30 Why has one always to stand alone? Why can one never go with the tide
31of the mob?^
32
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/15
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 3 August 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Road, Brixton, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 337
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace
2 Kensington
3 Monday
4
5 Dear Havelock,
6
7 Arrived at midnight last night after a most awful journey of 15 hour
8from Amsterdam. It was the last trains taking foreigners. Hundreds of
9men women & children in the boat fleeing - people just lay abut on
10the deck in the wet when there was no more room in the cabins & below.
11The sea was wild & the spray poured over the decks. I shall never
12forget it. Then there was a wild fight for ^seats in the^ trains!
13
14 Good bye dear you & Edith I long to see
15 Olive
16
17 Germany is determined to fight. It is she who is the cause of all. In
18Holland they are expecting the Prussians there tomorrow to take the
19Hague & the ports. All the soldiers are mobilized, but of course they
20can do nothing. War is Hell. They will fight in Africa too.
21
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/16
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1906
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 254
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The year and also the place which this fragment of a letter was sent from are provided by Cronwright-Schreiner (1924: 254). The beginning and end are missing.
1 [page/s missing] harder, or if down below there is the same tenderness
2& idealism below the quiet passive surface.
3
4 One thing is beautiful to me is that though my personal life has
5become crushed & indifferent to me, I have not lost one little grain
6of my faith in the possible beauty & greatness of human nature, the
7divine beauty of perfect love, & of truth. I am so absolute certain
8that the dream the ideal of beauty & goodness is that towards which
9human nature is slowly moving. And life has been very, very, beautiful.
10 Even the power to heal & repress oneself is beautiful if there is
11nothing else. And ones joy in nature & in knowing & trying to
12understand has been glorious; & I have had better & more beautiful
13friends than any one in the world. Tell me a little about yourself:
14not in the "dam'd fine horse" style - really. [page/s missing]
15
16 Olive
17
18
19
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner’s version of this letter fragment is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/17
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date30 September 1899
Address FromKarree Kloof, Kran Kuil, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 227-8; Rive 1987: 384
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner stayed on a farm near Kran Kuil from late August to mid November 1899. The start of the letter is missing.
1 [page/s missing] the company. It's very hard to refuse.
2
3 Johannesburg is now practically depopulated, & the women & children
4are fleeing out of the Free State also into the Colony. But I have not
5the slightest doubt war will spread throughout the whole country.
6
7 You scorn my love for England & English men. Well I have traveled a
8bit about the world I have lived in South Africa, 30 out of forty-odd
9years of my life, & still the noblest dearest & most beloved humans I
10have met remain Englishmen in the main. Not only you & Carpenter & all
11the others I personally love & admire, but such men as dear old
12General Sir William Butler, who threw up his post here as general in
13the British army & has gone home because he said the war would be a
14gross immorality, are to me as fine representatives of the race human
15as any I am likely to see, according to my view. And this is not
16taking into view the great army of the dead from Shakespeare & Milton
17to Shelly, Darwin, George Elliot & Browning. An Englishman is like a
18Jew he seems to be either Christ or Judas; but on the whole much as I
19love all races of men I have yet been thrown into contact with I think
20we do pretty well. Not better than other races, but [page/s missing]
21
22 if a cultured person, with any knowledge of human nature!!
23
24 An old Boer woman I once knew after half an hour running down the
25English for their pride & selfishness & cruelty, said "And yet, when
26you do get an Englishman good he's the ?best on earth."
27
28 However I have written a whole long article almost a book on the
29Englishman in Africa which will explain my views. Public affairs are
30so bad one can't write of them any more. Dear old Herbert Spencer has
31spoken & Morley & other but they have
32
33^waited till it was too late. Six months ago it would have saved the
34situation.
35
36 Olive^
37
Notation
The 'long article almost a book' Schreiner refers to is An English South African’s View of the Situation, originally published in the South African News over three successive days; see 'Words in Season. An English South African's View of the Situation' South African News 1 June 1899 (p.8), 2 June 1899 (p.8) and 3 June 1899 (also p.8). It was also reprinted in a number of other newspapers. It then was published as a pamphlet, then as a book. A second edition of the book was ready but withdrawn from publication with Hodder and Stoughton by Schreiner when the South African War started in October 1899, so as not to profit from this. Rive's version of this letter has been misdated, omits part of the letter, and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/18
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday June 1911
Address FromVictoria Falls Hotel, Zimbabwe
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 301-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date minus the year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner's visit to the Victoria Falls was in early June 1911. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Victoria Falls Hotel
2 Zambesi
3 S.A.
4 Thursday
5
6 Dear Havelock boy,
7
8 We leave tomorrow this most lovely & beautiful & wonderful of earthly
9sights. No pictures, nothing that has ever been said of it gives the
10faintest conception of what this is. The vast "Spirit of the Waters."
11
12 A mile & a quarter of water leaping down into the almighty chasm with
13the roar of thunder that sounds for eighteen miles, & which as it
14falls leaps up again into the into clouds of white & rainbow tinted
15mists 4000 feet high. The colours, the colours, the wild spirits of
16the mist it is that that overpowers one & fills one with joy. One
17cries but only from happiness. We were nearly all drowned on Tues-day,
18the motor boat we were on broke down & we were drifting down onto the
19falls. We were only saved by a canoe coming past & going for help to
20the landing & calling six more canoes which took us all out & towed
21the boat to land. The pluck of all the women & girls except one
22miserable old Christian was wonderful. I must tell you all about it
23some day. The curious thing is that having been so near death in its
24arms instead of making me feel horror of it, seems to draw me so much
25nearer it - my falls that I was nearly part of!! I have never loved
26any natural phenomena so.
27
28 Olive
29
30 You've no idea what a wild splendid country we pass through coming
31here
32
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/19
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date23 August 1920
Address FromOn board ship, Balmoral Castle
Address To14 Dover Mansions, Canterbury Road, Brixton, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date is provided by the postmark on this postcard and the address it was sent to and its recipient are on the card. On the front is a black and white picture of the Royal Mail Steamer ‘Balmoral Castle’.
1 We are nearing Madeira. I have not been sea sick at all. But my heart
2is troublesome. Have not lain down since I left England. Will write
3from Africa.
4

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/20
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date After Start: December 1886 ; Before End: March 1887
Address FromMontreux, Switzerland
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This postcard does not have a stamp, postmark or address on it. On its front is a sepia-tinted picture of Montreux, Clarens showing buildings at the lake?s edge. Schreiner stayed in Montreux from the end of December 1886 to mid March 1887.
1 Hotel Roth is the large square house close to the lake with the
2brown along the top. I have pricked a hole with m a needle just were
3my window is. You will see it if you hold it up to the light. ^I always
4walk up & down on the path you on the edge of the lake, going up from
5Hotel Roth.^
6
7 ^The house Byron lived in is in the one just behind Hotel Roth. Now
8it’s all write with snow. X this spot is the scene of Rousseau’s
9novel.^
10
11
Notation
Schreiner?s final insertion is written on the front of this postcard, in the border of the picture.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/21
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date7 May 1904
Address FromCape Town
Address ToCark's Water, Lelant, Cornwall, England
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date is provided by the postmark and the address this postcard was sent to and its recipient are on the card. The picture on the front shows Devil?s Peak and Table Mountain in Cape Town.
1 The house I am in is more to the right. This is a good view of Cape
2Town. The house I am in is over the hill where the photo was taken & I
3have this view before me all day.
4
5 Olive
6
7

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/22
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeOther
Letter DateOctober 1884
Address FromSt Leonards, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner other, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This is a blank envelope with some pieces of seaweed inside. There is no address, date, stamp or postmark or anything else on the envelope. The date and address have been written on the inside of its flap in an unknown hand.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/24
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 January 1886
Address FromRoyal Spa Hotel, Shanklin, Isle of Wight
Address To
Who ToE. Ray Lankester
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter exists only in the form of a handwritten copy, minus its beginning, made by Havelock Ellis.
1 To Prof Ray Lanchester from OS
2 Royal Spa Hotel
3 Shanklin
4 31 Jan Feb/86
5
6 ...You say: "It appears to me quite a truth proposition that marriage
7is not the natural tendency of man, or rather not a necessary
8characteristic of the race". That depends entirely on the definition
9one gives to the word marriage, which has half a dozen possible
10meanings. If one uses it in the conventional sense as a legal or
11religious contract wh. once entered upon cannot be broken at the will
12of the parties & wh. public opinion enforces, I consider it as much
13doomed as a ship with a hard hole knocked in itsthe bottom of it; it
14certainly is not characteristic of the race. But some species of
15relationship, other than that of existing forms of prostitution, must
16always exist between men & women if the race is to continue & whether
17monogamy, polgamy & polysandry it seems equally right to call it
18marriage & a necessity of the race. My own view & one wh. I have
19arrived at without any bias in its favour is that monogamy not only is
20that wh. most ideally satisfies one, but that it is the point towards
21wh. we are slowly surely though slowly tending. It seems, from a study
22of the wants of human nature, mental & physical, that it is the mode
23of relation capable of yielding the largest amount of satisfaction
24with the smallest amount of pain to both man & woman & offspring. At
25present of course it hardly ever exists, we have ?evil relationships
26on the part of the man & thewoman, & where it does exist I thinkit is
27certainly vitiated, I think, by the fact that it is not made an end in
28itself but subservient to material & other ulterior motives, that its
29benificence cannot be judged of. You seem to regard the relation of
30one with one as a purely artificial condition, possible only if the
31nature of woman has not free play, & if through material necessity she
32is driven to depend on man. I believe that the want for this
33relationship lies it the very foundation of woman's nature (& I think
34also in man's?), that if tomorrow she was free to develop her own
35powers in whatever direction nature impelled her & even monetarily
36independent of men, then I believe permanent & perfect marriage would
37come into existence generally such as you rightly describe as
38sometimes existing now "in wh. that man should obtain the very
39sweetest kind of service & attention viz. that wh. is bound up with
40genuine sexual love. It may not be very intelligent help or it may be
41itself of a very high intelligence - that does not much matter - the
42great point being that it is happily & gladly rendered & that there is
43a feeling that what is given by the woman in her care to the man is
44returned by him in his larger but not less genuine care of the woman."
45I have quoted the whole of this passage because it expresses so
46accurately the ideal of marriage wh. seems to me so seldom attainable
47now because women are not free, because that sweet & happily given
48service with the pleasure element being delight in bearing pain for
49him cannot be there if the man is not the one a woman chooses, but
50simply the one who offers her the best means of livelihood. It is
51"woman's ?irony?" that she has to sell herself, whether into the
52bitter loveless childless deformed untender state of prostitution or
53into loveless marriage. It is her right that she should be able to
54give herself freely to the man she loves, service for whom &
55dependence upon whom in her times of weakness would be sweet &
56precious to her instead of bitter. There are some factors you seem
57entirely to lose sight of in this man & woman question. There is in
58man human nature a desire to give & service service & to become one in
59interest with others existing apart from any pecuniary advantages;
60this fact has to be recognised & counted with by the student of human
61nature exactly as the condition of something or any other material
62phenomena & is to be taken ^into^ account by the study of the external
63world, or the conclusions become false. You seem to lose sight of this
64fact also. There is in woman a peculiar feeling (accounted for in its
65origin by physiological conditions I think) given not to men in
66general but to the particular man she loves, a feeling that she
67desires to look up to & lean on him & that she almost desires to
68suffer for him; & that suffering endured for him or through him is not
69the same as any other suffering. It is a fact wh. appears to run flat
70in the face of many of the received "women's rights" doctrines, but
71they will simply have to make room for it. To me it appears a
72singularly beneficent instinct considering the amount of suffering
73woman has to go through if the race is to continue. I think one sees
74the why of its development when one regards the mental as simply a
75solution to the physiological condition. There is no doubt it is
76intimately connected with sex feeling & that the fact that it is often
77strongly shown by little girls to their big brothers only shows that
78quite unconsciously sex instinct must be there. I remember when I was
79a little child being whipped till I could hardly stand by a big
80brother twelve years older than myself whom I worshipped, because I
81didn't open a door quickly. If anyone else had done it I would never
82have forgiven them to my dying day. But I hadn't the least feeling of
83resentment or injustice. I only crept away & felt as if my heart was
84broken. When I remember what a wild indomitable child I was & how
85fiercely I resented injustice, it stands out to me as a most
86remarkable case of instinct over-riding everything. I remember
87distinctly that I did not feel the least trace of unlove, only for
88weeks when I looked at his hands I used to quiver. I couldn't bear to
89think it was they that hurt me. This feeling I believe is lay dormant
90in woman, it always exists when she loves a man, but not of course
91when she is simply bought by him. The anguish wh. man can inflict on
92woman through taking advantage of this instinct is ^simply^ incalculable,
93 & the feeling appears to increase in intensity as woman advances in
94intellectual power, but I have no doubt that on the whole its action
95is benificent.
96
97 I doubt whether many men realise at all how great a fact in the life
98of woman is played by the longing to find in man an object of worship,
99a thing which she can look up to & trust. The Christian religion lived
100so long as& died so hard because it held out to woman an ideal man &
101said to him live for him, sacrifice yourself for him, he is noble. In
102the woman who has parted with Xy the strength has lain in the giving
103up this ideal & there is something pathetic in the stirring of passion
104with wh. such women turn to the world of men about them to try &
105refind it there. It is interesting as showing how distinctly any given
106religion is simply the outcome of a want in human nature. You may say
107that this desire is simply lunacy & idiocy. Be it so. But it is there
108& a fact wh. those who deal with social phenomena have to take into
109account. Do you really believe that when at the present day a man gets
110that loving tender service from a woman that he buys it from her? Do
111you know that if he was stricken down with disease & became dependent
112upon her support as a little child, then the full force of her love
113would leap out to him for the first time. A man may labour all his
114life & spend all his money on women, a wife or otherwise, & in the end
115he may never have had an act of true devotion from a woman, never have
116possessed one woman. No, by 'God', you can't buy us; if we give
117ourselves to you with the money it is still only a gift - you can buy
118nothing but the shells.
119
120 If you want to be tender & helpful to us & to feel your power, you
121will always have room enough for that side of your nature in our
122physical weakness & in the marvellous control our love gives you over
123us. I often wish I were a man just that I might be tender to women. A
124man can do so much more for a woman than she can do for him. It must
125be so glorious to have the same unlimited power & use it magnanimously.
126 A woman has a high sense of that sometimes & its so glorious splendid.
127
128 You say something wh. coming from an ordinary philistine I should take
129as a matter of course, but wh. coming from yourself is painful to me.
130You say that woman must be kept from the knowledge of the true facts
131of life. Why? In order that she may keep faith & hope & gentleness!
132Are you not using here the very argument that Xy & superstition have
133used in all ages to keep out knowledge? We don't question that it is
134the fact but it is better not to know it; it will destroy something
135beautiful? Surely we have passed beyond that stage in wh. men desire
136to put up a little screen in some corner of the earth & say 'At least
137here the sunlight of fact shall not come & scorch up our flowers - &
138then the screen gets knocked over at last, as it always must, & then
139are found to be nothing but toad stools behind it, the only things
140that can grow without light! If faith & hope & gentleness depended on
141ignorance then the sooner they went the better, but they do not depend
142on it. I remember the burst of infinite delight with wh. one day when
143I was thinking of some insects I had been watching it flashed upon me
144that life might originate within the parent form. I rushed into the
145house to proclaim my glorious discovery & was of course instantly
146annihilated, but I believe it was a glorious discovery.
147
148 Viewed from the intellectual side the sexual facts wh. underlie life
149from the most complex, the most delicately coordinated & therefore the
150most unreadable of the phenomena presented to our intelligence, viewed
151from the emotional they are the most beautiful; their power of
152expressing affection, of binding human beings together, of creating
153life puts them into the category of those things of wh. one does not
154easily speak, not because they are painful but because they are sacred.
155 The man who finds no food in sex matter for anything but a joke, &
156the ascetic who turns up his eyes at them are ?merely to be pitied.
157Perhaps you will say it is not the knowledge of physical truth you
158would keep from women but social facts. Here I cannot again agree with
159you. The knowledge of the saddest social facts, that there ^are^ women
160who never see a look of respect & tenderness in a man's eyes, who are
161of no 'use' among their 'close associates', whose natures are deformed
162by the over action of one part & the atrophy of another, that then one
163man, sometimes the noblest of the race, in whom inherited instinct
164acts so strongly that it always tends to obtain a ?sway incompatible
165with the full expression of those highest intelligent powers wh.
166constitute the developed custom, & in whom therefore there is always a
167conflict - or a submission followed by suffering, & desponding that is
168sometimes always ^almost^ despair. This is the saddest of social facts
169but the true knowledge of it does not make any woman's heart less
170?forth. It does not make her love man less or desire his love less, I
171think it makes her gentler all round
172
173 Olive Schreiner
174
175
176
177

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD 30/33/e
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeTelegram
Letter Date12 December 1920
Address FromCape Town
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner telegram, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date and the address this telegram was sent from are provided by the official postmarks.
1 From Mrs W. P. Schreiner
2
3 CA 51 K CAPETOWNPO 12 LG/11.
4
5 CRONWRIGHT SCHREINER STANDARD BANK CLEMENTS LANE LN.
6
7 OLIVE DIED PEACEFULLY TENTH SCHREINER.
8
9
10
11
Notation
Olive Schreiner died late on 10 December or in the early hours of 11 December 1920, while reading; her glasses were on, a book had fallen from her hands, and the candle had burned out. Cronwright-Schreiner has written onto this telegram: 'Received 5.40pm 13th December 1920 50 Cambridge Terrace, London, W.2. I first got the news in the papers at breakfast'.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mrs Goosen 87.17/2/Goos/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date14 May 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMrs Goosen
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 May 14th 1909
3
4 My dear Mrs Goosen
5
6 My friend Mrs Haldane Murray has just written to tell me how hard you
7are working for us at Cathcart. This is just to hold out a hand of
8friendship to you. I know how difficult it often is to start a new
9thing in an up-country, but once started, & when our women really
10understand the the great good, not only to themselves, but to men &
11all the nation, the freedom of women will bring, I believe our South
12African women will be even more earnest & successful than others.
13
14 I am sending you a little paper by my husband who is strongly in
15favour of women's getting the vote.
16
17 Yours very sincerely & wishing you all success
18 Olive Schreiner
19
20
Notation
The 'little paper' by Cronwright-Schreiner cannot be established.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Horatio Kitchener 87.17/1/Kitch/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date9 January 1901
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToHoratio Kitchener
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Jan 9th 1901
3
4 Lord Kitchener
5
6 Dear Sir,
7
8 I trust you will pardon the liberty I am taking in asking whether, if
9you should come to this part of the country you would give me the
10favour of unreadable ^half^ an hour's interview with you. If you do not
11come to Hanover & would allow me to come to Noupoort or de Aar to meet
12you, I would be glad to do so.
13
14 The smallest wild duck knows more about the ins-&-outs of its own
15little mountain tarn, than the largest swan from the great lakes who
16has but newly arrived there can always do. Therefore it is not
17absolutely irrational that I should wish to put a few points before
18you.
19
20 If you would kindly allow your secretary to write & tell me whether
21you would be willing to see me, I should be very much obliged.
22
23 Yours faithfully
24 Olive Schreiner
25
26
27

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday April 1909
Address FromEastbergholt, Tamboer's Kloof Road, Gardens, Cape Town
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed at Eastbergholt in Cape Town for part of April 1909.
1 Cap
2 Eastburgholt
3 Tamboer's Kloof Road
4 Tamboer's Kloof
5 Cape Town
6
7 Wednesday
8
9 Dear Friend
10
11 Please return me that little paper I brought you. I only wished you to
12see that I too have had my dreams of a United South Africa; a South
13Africa Federated into one great collection of Free State: & in which
14we who had suffered so terribly & taught by our suffering would
15withhold freedom & justice from some of our fellow South Africans,
16irrespective of race or colour or creed. In those long months when I
17live in one little empty room with a stretcher & a box as its only
18furniture, & 36 natives set to guard me at my doors & windows night &
19day, when I was only allowed out to fetch my water from the fountain
20at certain hours, & when I used to see not only English women but
21Dutch women walking free, hanging on the arms often, of English
22officers; in all that awful loneliness & darkness the thought that
23came to comfort me was that out of all this, would arise in us who
24suffered a love not only of freedom for ourselves but for all our
25fellows. If we have not learnt that, then indeed we have learnt
26nothing.
27
28 Has it ever struck you, Malan, that the day will come when we shall
29need the love & devotion of the black & coloured man; just as the day
30will come & come soon when England & the "Empire" will need the
31loyalty & love of ^white^ South Africans. To-day is our hour to win
32their love & confidence. My dear friend, draw yourself sometimes apart
33from the noise & greed of the political world about you, & look at
34these matters by the light of that deeper spiritual instinct that is
35within you.
36
37 Your friend
38 Olive Schreiner
39
40
Notation
The 'little paper' referred to is 'Views on closer union', a lengthy article published in the Transvaal Leader on 21 December 1908 and the Cape Times on 22 December 1908 (p.9); it appeared as a short book in 1909.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/2
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1907 ; Before End: 1910
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content. Various delegations made representations in Britain supporting or opposing Union of the former settler states of South Africa in 1908 and 1909. Edward VII died in May 1910 and the letter was written before this.
1 Dear Friend
2
3 With great pleasure republish my little letter about Mrs Koopmans As
4to my brother Will, you know I was more opposed to his line of policy,
5even than you were, but when Jameson is the Lieutenant of the leader
6of the South African party, when men like Farrer & Hall & Fitz Patrick
7whose hands drip with the blood of Boer women & children only less
8plentifully than Rhodes, when Jan Smuts gets up & makes a speech
9commending Rhodes, & saying he wishes he were alive to take part in
10the Union of to-day, then I think it is time that all small
11differences as to the exact line of policy were dropped. I cannot
12understand South African men going & kissing the hand of that
13licentious scoundrel King Edward the 7th & going to England to
14?beseech the English people to allow them to have a Union; & then
15talking of "we can't appeal to England" - "England has nothing to do
16with us". It is a sight for Gods & men to laugh at. I only hope they
17will now be loyal to their King & their Empire; for a traitor is the
18lowest thing that creeps on Earth!
19
20 I'd like to have a long talk with you I'm not well enough to write.
21
22 Yours ever
23 Olive Schreiner
24
25
Notation
Schreiner's 'little paper' about Marie Koopmans-De Wet was an obituary; see 'Marie Koopmans-de Wet' De Suid-Afrikaan 1 Augustus 1906 (p.12).

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/3
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 December 1908
Address FromHotel Milner, Matjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 Hotel Milner
2Matjiesfontein
3Cape Colony
4
5 Dec 28 / 08
6
7 My dear Friend
8
9 I am sending you a copy of my paper on Closer Union, as you may not
10have had time to read it in the Cape Times.
11
12 It goes to my heart to think that you & I should be wide as the poles
13apart in this matter. The really great South African will not be a man
14who stands for this or that party, or race, or sect, or language - but
15for all. I valued very much a kind little Xmas card I got from Onze
16Jan
. Love to your wife & the little ones. I wish you would all come up
17here for a few days during the conventions holiday.
18
19 Aren't you Convention people tired of buttering each other up! When
20people flatter me so much I always suspect them of having some evil
21design! Some day the butter will all melt, & then you will fight like
22the Killing Cats!
23
24 I shall be staying here for two or three months as I got too ill at De
25Aar.
26
27 Yours ever
28 Olive Schreiner
29
Notation
Schreiner's Closer Union originated as a lengthy article published in the Transvaal Leader on 21 December 1908 and the Cape Times on 22 December 1908 (p.9); it appeared as a short book in 1909.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/4
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Tuesday July 1913 ; Before End: September 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content.
1 De Aar
2 Tuesday
3
4 To F S Malan
5
6 My dear Friend
7
8 My heart is sore sorrowful. What are these things which you are doing
9up in the Transvaal? Could any one have dreamed 1899 that in a short
10space of 14 years a Boer Government in South Africa would turn British
11troops on to shoot down not merely men women & children but but
12Labuschagnes & Van der Merwes in their native land in defense of those
13mining magnates property; who have already plunged South Africa into
14bloodshed & made our soil reek with the blood of untold English
15soldiers & heroic Boer women. Don't think I blame you personally. My
16old love for you, & my deep faith in you may perhaps make me unjust in
17believing you can be to blame.
18
19 Unless I had it from your lips I couldn't believe that the prisoner of
20?Koberg has changed so utterly. As And I must say that as far as Sauer
21& Smuts are concerned they really intended what has happened when they
22called British ?hireling troops in to shoot down South Africans. I d
23believe that the truth - though it may never come to light as the real
24truths of the intrigues of the mining Houses against the Transvaal
25will never be known - that money (perhaps not in the form of hard
26cash) did flow like water in protection of the mining magnates
27property - & that the absolute disregard of human life to this end did
28not flow from only from yourselves.
29
30 You have been so near & dear to my spirit in the past, I have fixed
31such great hopes on you that I feel I cannot for this once remain
32silent without opening my heart to you.
33
34 Yours always
35 Olive Schreiner
36
37

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/5
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1902 ; Before End: 1913
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter can be approximately dated by reference to content. It concerns facilities in Company's Gardens near the Parliament in Cape Town and content indicates Schreiner was in Cape Town when she wrote it.
1 Dear Friend
2
3 I enclose a cutting from the SA New. (I don't know by whom its
4written) I hear you are on the committee which reports on the matter.
5
6 Surely my dear friend will stand with those who do not wish to see a
7monopoly made complete & crushing. This little ?pavilion is splendidly
8unreadable. I know for I go two or three times a week. You can get
9nothing fit to eat or drink at the other place. To put us entirely in
10the hands of the big companies would be a public injury.
11
12 If I were well enough I would come to see you about it. To sell the
13?pavilion to the Companies would be quite unworthy of our government,
14when even the Jameson rule did not do it. I hope you share my view. If
15not please don't act hastily. Think it over again.
16
17 Yours ever
18 Olive Schreiner
19
20
Notation
The cutting referred to is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/6
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1906 ; Before End: 1910
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content as having been written after the restitution of responsible government and before Union in South Africa. Content indicates that Schreiner was in Cape Town when she wrote it.
1 Dear Friend
2
3 Your few words on the woman question last night were of great value to
4me.
5
6 That man said that the great question in South Africa at the moment
7was that the devils & the angels were fighting for the soul of Malan;
8at least on this front the angels have won. May it be so also on that
9larger questions which looms as the great moral problem before all
10South African men & women, & which will determine the future of South
11Africa.
12
13 Yours ever
14 Olive Schreiner
15
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/7
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 January 1909
Address FromHotel Milner, Matjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 Hotel Milner
2 Matjiesfontein
3 Cape Colony
4
5 Jan 6 1909
6
7 My dear F.S. Malan
8
9 Thank-you for your letter. I wanted to sit down & answer it the hour
10it came, but I have not been well enough till now. It comforted my
11heart to hear your words on the native question. Even if you do
12nothing, it is something to know you feel the duty we owe to the
13millions in our power.
14
15 Yes, it is a sad thing that the small body of thoughtful persons in
16South Africa who are really seeking for the best for their country
17without thought of self cannot be thrown more into contact with each
18other, by the exchange of thought & feeling to strengthen & also to
19back one another. I have had several very interesting letters ^since I
20wrote my paper^ from public men & others expressing sympathy with the
21broader view of the native question & our national life; but each
22write in the sad tone of - "I, only I am left." I suppose there are
23hours when we all of us sit with Elija at the door of his cave; but
24would not the answer be even in South Africa today - "Have I not kept
25unto me -" What I feel we really need is some central point about
26which we may rally! That a small strong united, enlightened party,
27never in the majority, but always making its presence felt might do
28great things for South Africa even now.
29
30 Your letter is so full of things I want to write about but it is so
31hard to write & so easy to talk I wish we could rather speak. You say,
32"How is a statesman to represent all, when all divided." (NB. The
33great man or men who are able to lead & help South Africa need not
34necessarily be part politics: they may be newspaper editors or
35anything else, so they lead & enlighten the people. You, as far as I
36can see, which is of course only a little way, were doing far greater
37work when you wrote those wonderful little sub leaders in Ons Land,
38which even Milner said were the most wonderful things in journalism he
39had ever come across, & when you were sitting a prisoner in ?Toku,
40than you have ever done since you became an important member of a
41party ministry.) Of course a great man cannot represent all when all
42are divided. A great man does not represent, unreadable he can leave
43small men to do that; he leads, & teaches, & unites men in ways they
44would not have been led, & taught united without him! All good & true
45men can only represent one thing - their principles of justice & right
46- in a complex land like this these may lead them now to aid one party
47by opposing them & showing them they are wrong & then another.
48Yesterday it was the English South African who had to be helped, by
49resisting him in his course of injustice & oppression towards the
50Republics, tomorrow it may be farming element ie the land money
51capitalists; who have to be resisted in their attempt to make all
52burdens fall on other classes; the next day it may be all white
53classes who are combined by greed & fear to do injustice to the dark:
54- but while he does this he will steadily seek the good of all. He
55will sympathize with all where he can sympathize. He will recognize
56the good. You may say "Yes, & he will die of a broken heart before he
57is fifty." Yes, I think so too. But what does it matter. He'll have to
58die some way any how. There is one rather monotonous story about the
59^all^ world's greatest & best sons - "He was crucified, died & buried -
60& the third day he rose again from the dead! Perhaps he is not
61physically crucified, nor does he physically rise again; but he
62sacrifices again & again those ambitions that are dear to the heart of
63man, & perhaps those friendships & associations that are dearer than
64all, & accepts what seems failure & defeat - but the large human ends
65of humanity & justice for which he lived go on & unreadable triumph
66because he suffered defeat & failure. When dear old Sir William Butler
67left this country he wrote me a heart-broken letter from Madeira; it
68seemed even to him that he had failed utterly, & that all he had done
69was of no use. But even you & I can to-day see that the part he plaid
70in South Africa was a much greater success than that of Milner &
71Rhodes; & in the years to come all men will see it. That's the only
72kind of success one wants for the men one loves & wants to look up it
73to. These are the true leaders of men, not the followers of majorities;
74 or even always the leaders of minorities; the men who at times have
75to stand quite alone - & do.
76
77 You say, my dear friend, that my ideal is that of a philosophic
78thinker, & not of a "statesman". Well, it certainly isn't of a Rhodes
79or a Milner or a Curzon or of some men near home; but as I look upon
80statesmen of that type as as a kind of unreadable parasite developed
81in the blood of humanity & feeding on it, I have no ambition that any
82man I value should attain it to it.
83
84 I do not value the mere philosophic thinker at all. The man I value,
85who alone seems to me really great, is the man who strives to put it
86in to action & incarnate in his life the ideals that have shaped
87themselves in his soul. He will fail often; he will make mistakes; it
88is for no man to blame him or judge him, who has ever in the humblest
89way tried to realize his own ideals in practical daily life. I see
90only too clearly the almost superhuman difficulties which must rise
91before any ^man^ who in South Africa, tries to lead ^practically^ his
92fellows towards broader ideals of humanity & natural life - but I do
93see glorious possibilities - though they may often mean "heaven's
94success bound to Earth's failures." South Africa seems to me to-day to
95call aloud for some man who amid the universal materialism & racial
96narrowness shall raise a nobler standard & try to induce us to follow
97it. I think you are in a peculiarly happy position because being Dutch
98by blood & having suffered & done so much for your own race they will
99be inclined to be influenced by you where they would not be by another,
100 & at the same time I think you are more trusted by the English than
101any man of non English blood. And at this moment there are
102opportunities of influencing the life of millions for good, or for
103evil that only come once, & perhaps not so often in a hundred years.
104
105 The problems of Dutch & English have for me quite vanished away from
106the practical horizon in South Africa now. The problem that is rising
107before us is that of the combination of the capitalist-classes,
108land-owning & mine-owning, against the rest of the community; & ^an^
109ignorant, blind, land-thirsty, gold-thirsty native policy; which will
110plunge South Africa into war & bitterness, compared ^with^ which the
111Boer War was nothing. In the picture of Jameson walking with his arm
112round the neck of his fellow "Conventioner" of Africander blood, I see
113an omen of evil. It is not love that is uniting you all - it is greed.
114Cheap land, cheap labour, cheap mines, exploit the nigger - that is
115the bond that is uniting you! Merriman tells us there are to be no
116more parties; that every principle is to die; well we shall see! This
117is a long & very stupid letter. But you know how hard it is to write
118compared to talking.
119
120 Yours ever
121 Olive Schreiner
122
Notation
The paper Schreiner refers to having written is 'Views on closer union', a lengthy article published in the Transvaal Leader on 21 December 1908 and the Cape Times on 22 December 1908 (p.9); it appeared as the short book Closer Union in 1909.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/8
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 10 July 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 De Aar
2 Saturday
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 Your speech was splendid. One friend writes me that there was hardly a
7woman belonging to us in the audience whose eyes were dry when you
8spoke of the English suffragettes.
9
10 There is one point I wish to write to you about as soon as I am better
11- it your statement that women do not suffer any injustice under men
12made laws. What of the C.D. Acts? What of the laws which even in this
13land shut us out from almost all professions & ways of earning our
14bread - ie. the law, the civil service &c &c. Only the other day a
15woman wanted to be articled as a clerk (There are endless other
16points) I wish we could talk of over the matter. I don't think you've
17given it full consideration. Have you??
18
19 But you speech was splendid, dear friend. I thank you for having done
20such justice to yourself. When you make such a speech on the native
21question I shall go to my grave more restfully, feeling one more dream
22was ^has been^ realized.
23
24 I suppose it was because you stood forward so as our leader, on the
25path of ^towards^ justice & freedom during the war, that I cannot shake
26myself from the feeling you should always stand so in other matters as
27well. I wish the time would come when you & my brother would work
28together. He has such a high admiration for your character. I was
29speaking to him the other day about some of our public men & their
30absolute want of any aim higher than immediate personal success - when
31he said, "But you don't include Malan - surely you understand that he
32is a man of an altogether different & higher calibre!" But he won't
33live long his heart is very bad, & you I hope have a long, long life
34before you. Therefore it matters so much in what direction your start
35it. My dear old brother is only finding his true direction near the
36end of his life - you must find yours now.
37
38 If one can't fix one's hope of ^for^ great, liberal enlightened lines of
39action up you, then there is no public man in South Africa to whom one
40can look with hope.
41
42 Thank you so much for your speech. Love to your dear wife.
43 Olive Schreiner
44
45 ^I am sending you a copy of "Votes for Women" with a very interesting
46letter by Lord Lytton, which you might find it worth while to read.^
47

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: F.S. Malan 1000/9
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 October 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToFrancois Stephanus ('FS') Malan
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Oct 16th 1913
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 You will have wondered why I never answered your kind letter, but I
7have been too ill to write to any one. I am leaving for Europe on the
86th of Dec to see if the Doctors in Europe can do for my heart.
9
10 I can't write to you about public matters. I personally have never
11wished Gladstone to be recalled, nor did I think your ministry ought
12to resign. Would he gain anything better by it? But I am opposed to
13Botha's silly Imperialism when he talks English, & narrow
14back-velt-ism when he talks Dutch!! Give my love to your wife, & the
15dear children. I hope the young generation will live to see a nobler
16broader, less racial spirit than we see in South Africa to-day. I
17shall be in Cape Town at the end of November & perhaps may have the
18pleasure of seeing you before I sail.
19
20 Your true friend
21 Olive Schreiner
22
23
24

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 1911
Address FromSomerset East, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content.
1 Somerset East
2 Sunday
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 I got here yesterday morning. Had a most kind welcome from Minnie de
7Villiers
sweet old mother Mrs Drummond & her son a fine young fellow
8of 20 who is in the bank here.
9
10 Somerset is lovely; but the air is damp. Mrs Drummonds house however
11stands on the hill & is built high off the ground. My plans are not
12clear yet, I must see how this suits me. Address here any how.
13
14 Mrs Brown came to see me last night, Cron had written to tell her I
15was coming. How nice if you were with me! There's a show here on the
1610th of March. Hearty greetings to Mr Murray.
17
18 ^Love to the children, much to your yourself
19 Olive Schreiner^
20
21 ^Mrs & Miss Scheppers from "Op-Sal" live in the town now. I am not
22likely to meet them as Mrs Drummond does not know them. They say they
23are very nice people.^
24
25
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/2
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday August 1908
Address FromYork House, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter can be approximately dated by reference to content regarding the meeting of the Cape Town Women's Enfranchisement League which is referred to in it.
1 York House
2 Muizenberg
3 Thursday
4
5 Dear Mrs Murray
6
7 Thankyou so much for your letter. I was so played up that the Purcells
8wouldn't let me go up to Matjiesfontein where I should have had to
9cook &c for myself. So I've stayed on here with them for a little & am
10now a different person. My husband has promised to come & spend Xmas
11with us, & then I shall go up with him as far as Matjiesfontein, where
12I have take the two rooms that used to be the Bank, as the hotel is
13closed. I shall see if I can get on with my work there; but if I find
14it too hot I shall really accept your very very kind invitation & come
15on to Portlock. It will be so lovely to have you all about me. It is
16so nice when your work is done to have friends to speak to; especially
17children, are so refreshing sometimes. Mrs Purcell has a dear little
18nephew from Johannesburg staying with her, as well as her own two.
19Yesterday we went for a delightful picnic to Cape Point in a waggon.
20unreadable
21
22 Yes that meeting quite prostrated me. I think the whole matter should
23have been dealt with quite differently. Mrs Macfadyen's name should
24have been kept out all-together. A motion should simply have been
25brought in saying that the committee ^felt they^ had acted beyond their
26powers, that they felt their action had been illegal. It would have
27been voted on & passed in a minute, & then if Mrs Macfadyen had wanted
28to take action it would only have been at the general meeting when she
29could have carried nothing. I so strongly agree with you & Mrs Murray
30that our work is quietly to educate the women of the country, & that
31by big petitions &c we unreadable raise opposition, & put off the day
32when the politicians will ^be able to^ give it.
33
34 We had a fine drawing room meeting here on Monday, over 60 present;
35six or seven joined. The speeches especially Mrs Alexanders were very
36good. Freemantle spoke very strongly & dwelt on the point that needs
37dwelling on, that women should demand the vote not only to further
38women's interests, but the general interests of the country. I am so
39glad things are going well with your branch. The real work that needs
40doing now is the starting of branches in all up-country places.
41
42 Many many thanks for your kind invitation.
43
44 Yours ever
45 Olive Schreiner
46

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/3
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateJanuary 1911
Address FromGraaff-Reinet Hotel, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToW. Steinmann
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter of payment is on headed invoice paper. Schreiner's addition to the bill is indicated by the chevron ^insertion^ symbols.
1 Graaff-Reinet Hotel
2 Jan 1911
3 Mrs Schreiner
4
5 2 bottles Claret 7/-
6
7
8^Please find enclosed a cheque for 7/- & send receipt to Mrs O
9Schreiner The Hotel Ouderberg
10
11O Schreiner^
12
13
14
Notation
Written on the back of this bill in an unknown hand is: 'This a/c was settled by Mr AH Murray some few days ago.'

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/4
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 May 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 300
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 May 13 / 11
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 I value your letter so much. I shall always keep it. I have had a
7great joy, perhaps, it is not certain, my little niece Ursula
8Schreiner
will study medicine. She will not quite decide till she goes
9to England next month with her brother Oliver & her father. I am so
10anxious for some of our best young women who have the ability & whose
11parents can manage the money to enter some of the professions & not
12the already over crowded occupations of teaching, nursing, typewriting,
13 boarding house keeping &c.
14
15 I am going to the Victoria Falls on the 2nd of June with my brother
16Will's wife, the two girls & Oliver. My sweet old brother Will has
17invited me & is paying for my ticket that I may have the chance of
18being with the children before they go. I am looking forward to it
19greatly if only I can keep well. It would be fine if you & Mr Murray
20were coming too. Its so beautiful if you have all your friends about
21you. My love to all the dear children. I send some stamps.
22
23 Good bye. Thank you so much, so very much for your letter.
24 Yours
25 Olive Schreiner
26
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/5
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeXmas
Letter DateDecember 1915
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToBobbie Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner xmas, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this Christmas card is provided by content. Schreiner was resident at St Mary Abbotts Terrace for a number of periods in early and late 1914 and then in 1915. On the front of the card is a colour picture of a scottie dog with the words 'A Faithful Friend', while printed inside the card is 'With hearty Christmas Greetings and all good wishes for the Coming Year.'
1 Dear Bobbie
2 From Olive Schreiner
3 London 1915
4
5 My best love & Xmas wishes to you all, dear ones, at Port Lock. I am
6not well enough to write, but I am always thinking of you
7
8 Olive
9
10
11
12
13
Notation
Schreiner's 'My best love' is written on an otherwise blank postcard enclosed with this Xmas card.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/6
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date13 November 1915
Address FromMaer Lake, Bude, Cornwall
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The addressee and the address this postcard was sent to are on its front.
1 Maer Lake
2 Bude
3 North Cornwall
4 Nov 13th 1915
5
6 Dear Friend,
7
8 I've been so often with you all in my thoughts, but I've been too ill
9to write to any one. I'm so much better here I'm going to write a long
10letter soon.
11
12 My love to you
13 Olive
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/8
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 February 1909
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Matjiesfontein
2 Feb 28th 1909
3
4 My dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Thank you much for your letter. I have sent it to Mrs Brown who will
7send it on to Mrs Purcell, Mrs Murray & Mrs de Villiers (the
8advocate's wife) who will I know all agree with me that the branches
9must keep their own little subscriptions if the organization is to
10live at all, & spread. I am sure we shall carry it.
11
12 I do hope Mrs Murray will be elected president. Mrs Brown is going to
13propose that there be no deputy Chairman there being so many able
14vice-presidents one of whom can always mak take the chair. You will
15see my dear friend Constance Lytton has gone to prison with the others.
16 I should very greatly like to come & visit you. We might talk it over
17when we meet in town. I shall try to go down at least for a week.
18
19 Keep the little book as long as you can make any use of it, by all
20means.
21
22 I feel very down hearted about this Unification scheme. It puts away
23women's enfranchisement & all advanced legislation for twenty years if
24it is carried. I cannot help hoping that something will yet happen &
25save us from it.
26
27 Yours most sincerely
28 Olive Schreiner
29
30

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/9
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 April 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 April 25th 1912
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 Thank you for your letter. You can't think how pretty the children
7beautiful karross looks over the sofa in my little study. It makes it
8quite another room. I am writing now with my feet on your little
9footstool & a big fire burning in my fire place, as the rain is
10falling out side & I always love a big fire if it is possible to have
11one, keeping both the big glass door & window open at the same time.
12
13 I have returned the medicine Mrs Meredith so kindly sent me, as I've
14got mine from England. I'm so glad you all had such a good time at
15Port Elizabeth. I wish next year you could all come to Cape Town if I
16am there I should feel like having my family all about me. How is your
17garden doing? All my roses are going out of bloom except the two Macon
18Dinges which are covered with buds & flowers. We are having lovely
19rains.
20
21 I've so much to say I don't know where to begin. I wish we could have
22a talk of an hour or two.
23
24 You say the committee in Cape Town criticised you so &c - but was it
25the committee or Mrs Solly. She has been doing all kinds of things
26trying to run every thing her own way. The committee had to oppose her
27& she threatened to resign as secretary, but has changed her mind & is
28continuing.
29
30 You ask about that central committee. I would have nothing to do with it.
31^What do you want a central Committee for??^
32
33 It seems to me that for the next five or eight years our work in S.A.
34is simple "spade" work, as it was in England 25 years ago. What we the
35women who desire the emancipation of all women have to do is to try to
36make those women who have not seen its importance to see it, to hold
37endless drawing room meetings, even if they be only meetings of 9 or
3810 persons.
39
40 To try & advance the education of all girls by all in our power: to
41read & study social & public matters ourselves, so that, when we have
42the vote we shall be able wisely & independently to use it, each for
43those ends we think most important. The men in S.A. are much more
44liberal & enlightened on the woman question than the mass of ourselves,
45 & it is ourselves we have to try to rouse, & enlighten.
46
47 As soon as a very large mass of women in S.A. wish for the vote men
48will give it them at once. Our condition here is very different from
49that of women in England
.
50
51 See how generous men have been in offering every University honour to
52women? The judges have now decided that as far as the law goes women
53may be attorneys; & I have no doubt when some of our women have
54qualified as Barristers they will be allowed to practice.
55
56 It is not by hanging about around members of Parliament sending
57petitions, & begging for the vote - but by labouring to rouse &
58enlighten ourselves & to fit ourselves for using it, that it seems to
59me we shall be best doing our work in S.A. today.
60
61 If I lived in C. Town or any other large town every fortnight I should
62have an At Home afternoon for discussing all questions related to
63women's position, and sometimes an evening At Home to which young
64Barristers & other men who cannot come in the day could come. We
65should in a friendly way discuss all sex problems. We would not need
66to have set speakers every time. With the vast amount of splendid
67literature on the woman questions we can get now, I would much rather
68let some one read something an extract from some book or pamphlet &
69then discuss it. If every member who had a little house of her own
70would do this, we should soon number thousands where we now number
71hundreds.
72
73 I would have the meetings - as I have always had all meetings I have
74had - not as meetings of any special society but after each gathering
75I should try to collect members of the society. The W.E.L. is simply a
76society for educating women to desire the vote, but at private
77meetings one can discuss all the side issues which are so immensely
78important - such as temperance, prostitution, the education of women
79&c, &c, &c.
80
81 This is the direction in which I feel our work lies. We should see
82that there was not a village or hamlet in S.A. to which some suitable
83person carefully chosen had not been sent to try & rouse women to
84think on the matter.
85
86 What we want today is an evangelist movement, rousing & touching the
87women of S.A. not a mere little political movement centering round the
88parliament house in C. Town. When the mass, or even a very large mass
89of women & men in S.A. feel it is right that women should have their
90share in guiding the state, & that is wrong & an injustice injuring
91the nation to withhold it from the politicians will move at once.
92
93 The most important point of all is how we are educating & influencing
94our young girls, who in the ten years time will be the women of S.A.
95guiding its destinies - teaching them to be brave, to fear nothing; to
96desire freedom for themselves & all other women on Earth: - trying to
97make them feel they have a duty to themselves & also to the world at
98large.
99
100Later. It is evening now & I am just going to get tea ready, am
101writing a few lines while the kettle boils. I wanted to write to you
102about Miss Hyett & many other things, but I can't this time.
103
104 I have never been able to do any writing this year either in Cape Town
105or here. It was very delightful to see my dear friends in Cape Town &
106it was better than being here in the heat, but I could only get
107through the day by tying down most part of it. I can never get blood
108enough now in my brain to work without getting faint. The love of my
109friends is very precious to me - but oh how I long for a little more
110strength to do a little more work. I have done nothing with my life.
111
112 Give my dear love to the children - Miss Hyett wrote so
113enthusiastically about them. She says she is sure they more than
114justify all your methods of bringing them up, when they are grown.
115
116 Good bye
117 Olive
118
119 ^P.S. Dear friend, Would you mind returning me the pages of this letter
120from three to six. A friend in Cape Town wrote to me to-day asking me
121what form I thought our work for the vote should take in Africa, I
122can't write again to her so if you wouldn't mind sending them back to
123me I can send them to her, which will save my writing.^
124
125
126
Notation
The paragraph in this letter beginning 'It seems to me that for the next five or eight years?' through to and including the paragraph beginning 'The most important point of all is how we are educating & influencing our young girls' are those referred to by Schreiner in her P.S. as being on pages 3 to 6.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/10
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date19 January 1909
Address FromHotel Milner, Matjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 Hotel Milner
2 Matjiesfontein
3 Cape Colony
4 Jan 19/09
5
6 Dear Mrs Murray
7
8 I was so glad to get your letter with its valuable news. I should have
9answered it at once, but I have been ill for a long time with my heart
10& have now come here for a change from De Aar.
11
12 I hope your branch grows: it is on small branches to educate our women,
13 being started all over the country that the success of our work in
14South Africa depends. I hear Mrs Saul Solomon is coming out next month;
15 she is deeply interest in Woman's Suffrage & has been working hard
16for it in England, & I hope she will put new life into the work in
17Cape Town, which needs it.
18
19 Have you read a book called The Convert by Elizabeth Robins? It is on
20^about^ the suffragette movement in London. Real women & men are brought
21in, but there is also a mere story ^part^, which I think touches the
22question very near its root. If it were only a vote we wanted, perhaps
23those people would be quite right who say it is not worth suffering &
24going to prison for, or even dying, if that were necessary. Its
25because the vote means so much more; because of the great questions of
26sex & of social life lying behind that it is worth all the sacrifice
27we can make.
28
29 I am enclosing you a very beautiful letter I have had from a dear
30friend of mine Lady Constance Lytton a daughter of the Earl of Lytton
31the writer & a niece of Lady Locks who once lived at the Cape. Please
32return it me
. She was at first very much opposed to the suffragettes
33but is now one of their leading workers. She is one of the noblest &
34most beautiful women both in mind & body that I ever met.
35
36 All success to you in your work my dear friend.
37 Olive Schreiner
38
39 I have just had letters from my dear friends Miss Molteno & Miss
40Greene
who are now in Switzerland. I wish they would throw themselves
41into this work & come & help us. I have a feeling that one day they
42will. OS
43
44
45
Notation
The book referred to is Elizabeth Robins (1907) The Convert London: Methuen.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/11
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 February 1909
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Matjiesfontein
2 Feb 7th 1909
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Yes, make any use you like of Lady Constance Lytton's letter that you
7think will be useful, but don't let any of it get into print. By the
8post which has just come & brought me your letter, is also one from
9her, very full of joy in the work & enthusiastic love for Mrs Pethick
10Lawrence
& the other leaders.
11
12 I do think you will be so very right in starting & working your own
13society entirely unconnected with those in Cape Town. Why not ^too^ call
14yours simply "the Woman's Association" & make it a little broader in
15its scope - to take in all matters directly affecting womans position;
16I have resigned my position as the President of the woman's
17enfranchisement but When I am in Cape Town I want you & some other
18women such as Mrs Brown Mrs Charles Molteno, Mrs Murray, Mrs Purcell,
19that splendid woman Mrs Advocate de Villiers &c to come together &
20form a little society not at all to oppose any other woman's league
21but on a broader basis. But we can speak of this when we meet.
22
23 Your letter is very cheering & valuable.
24
25 Yours ever
26 Olive Schreiner
27
28 I know Con Lytton would like any use to be made of any thing she wrote
29that she thought could possibly help us in our work. I send you her
30last to me with a few lines about her work.
31
Notation
The enclosed 'few lines' from Constance Lytton are no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/12
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Monday September 1920 ; Before End: October 1920
Address FromBirzana, Plumstead, Cape Town
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to address and content. Schreiner stayed with her niece Ursula Scott, her sister-in-law Fan Schreiner, and her friend Lucy Molteno, in Cape Town after her arrival from Britain on 30 August 1920, moving to a boarding-house in Wynberg in late October, where she was resident until her death on 11 December 1920.
1 c/o Mrs ^Dr^ Scott
2 Birzana
3 Plumstead
4 Cape Town
5 Monday
6
7 My dear dear Friend
8
9 I was so glad to get your letter yesterday & one from Andre this
10morning. Kathie will have left by this time but I am hoping Bobbie
11will be able to come & see me before he goes. I suppose I should not
12know him again if I saw him in the street I do wish there was any hope
13of your coming here in the summer. Is there none? I cant come to
14Graaff Reinet while its so hot, but I'm just building on coming to you
15in the winter say about the end of March when it begins to get cool.
16If Broederstroom is too damp I'll board in Graaff Reinet & come out to
17see you whenever I can, & I'll always be able to see you when you come
18in. But I do hope I'll be able to stay at the farm.
19
20 It's beautiful to think of Andre happy & in her own home. What a sweet
21wife she will be, & what a mother. I hope they will have children. The
22niece with whom I am staying is going to have a second little baby.
23Her little boy is such a joy to me. I am only in trouble because so
24far I can't get rooms anywhere. I have advertised but got no answers.
25I cant go back to England now just when the awful winter is coming, &
26the expense is enormous. I have to be be quite close to the tram or
27train as my heart troubles me so I get attacks of angina as soon as I
28walk. I suppose something will turn up, but I have been nearer despair
29than I've ever been in my life. The old boarding houses I used to go
30to, are all full. G I fear Kathie will be gone by this time but I do
31hope Bobbie will be able to see me. I am going to spend two days with
32Mrs Charles Molteno, & if he can't come I'll get her to drive me to
33the college where perhaps I shall be able to see him for a minute.
34
35 Oh dear friend, it would be such a joy to see you.
36
37 Anna Purcell drove me on Sunday to see her husbands grave at Maitland:
38it is a mercy she has her three dear beautiful children. Tell -
39Address care Standard-Bank Strand Street Cape Town, not here, as I
40don't know where I shall be.
41
42 Olive
43
44
45
Notation
In mid 1921, Cronwright-Schreiner wrote to Mrs Murray (Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/32) concerning the letters Olive Schreiner had written to her, as follows:

Personal

Rosebank House
Rosebank (Cape),
21.6.21

Dear Mrs Murray

Thank you for your letter of the 25th May which, for some unaccountable reason, did not reach me (at Johannesburg) till the 16th inst. It explains the fact that I have not replied sooner. I am returning to Rosebank early in August, & shall be so grateful if you will kin, as so kindly offered, send me Olive’s letters, to reach Rosebank about the middle of July. I shall of course return them, as you wish; but I am sure Olive would like all her letters to be destroyed as the only safeguard against their eventual publication. You may not like to destroy them now, but I hope you will see that, on your death, they are destroyed. Other friends are going through her letters to them & making extracts & some of them are then destroying. However, I shall return them to you uninjured.

Yes, I sent you the photo & am so glad you have it & like it. I wanted to be photographed with her in London & she was keen about it; but she delayed until it was too late, & so, on her death, all I had to fall back on was her “passport” photo taken in Edgware Road on (I think) the 3rd August. I was indeed fortunate to be able to get it. I have a great collection of photographs of her, including two specially interesting, one taken on her 14th birthday & the other in 1877 (a superb thing) when she was writing “The African Farm”. There is considerable difficulty in accumulating all the facts about her early life (before the end of 1880), but a large amount of very interesting facts are coming to light which will be of the most engrossing interest to those who love her & value her great genius. She died so beautifully in her sleep after a happy & well day. She loved you most dearly, & indeed all of you.

I have just run up here from the Cradock district where I have been making arrangements for her burial on the highest peak of the mountains of my old farm (as she wished) & have been visiting her her the spots where she was governessing in 1875 & later. How vacant that great veld seemed when her radiant presence could see it no more.

With kind regards, yours very sincerely
S.C. Cronwright Schreiner

It would be of value to me in the preparation of her biography if you will would send me some notes about her as you saw & knew her, especially traits of her great & baffling personality. I want especially such facts as will enable people to realize how ?massive her personality was; & often small unreadable & peculiarities show that. Her genius speaks for itself in her writings.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/13
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: April 1913 ; Before End: September 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from April to late November 1913 and left South Africa for Europe in early December that year.
1 De Aar
2
3 My dear Friend
4
5 Thank you for your dear letter. I would gladly accept the offer of
6going to your house if you were still using it. But I'm sure if I were
7not coming you would let it at once, & you would lose all you would
8get for it.
9
10 I asked my niece Wynnie Hemming to come & stay with me for two months,
11& I thought she & I might come to Graaff Reinet together but she has
12just got a good post as teacher & cannot come. So I may not be able to
13come at all. It is just possible that my nephew Oliver & my niece
14Ursula Schreiner who arrive from England today may want to come & see
15& instead of our staying here for the week or ten days we might come
16to Graaff-Reinet. They could go to some Hotel & I to a room. But their
17coming is doubtful - they may not plan to come till October before
18they leave for England. It is so sweet of you to want me to have your
19house dear friend. If I were coming at once I would accept your loving
20offer gladly, but I can't let you keep the house empty for me.
21
22 I slept four hours last night without waking & feel greatly refreshed
23by it, though I da had to sleep sitting up.
24
25 My love to you all.
26
27 I don't know if I told you my friend wants me to come to England in
28December to see if the doctors there can do anything. But I doubt
29whether I shall be strong enough to sail. I would like to come to
30Graaff Reinet & see you all once more before I go, if I do go. If I
31get a little better I want so much to write a little letter explaining
32to the dear women of your union why I can't join with them great as is
33my sympathy with all women fighting to do away with any sex
34disabilities I feel so much that it is just the poorest & most
35helpless women we have to fight for: not only for ourselves. In this
36country native & coloured women suffer much more from the mere fact
37they are women than we do. We who are well educated, or are rich can
38do much better with out the legal recognition of our state.
39
40 I can't write more now but will try to write the letter.
41
42 Olive
43
44
45

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/14
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 March 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, London
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3 March 5th 1915
4
5 Dear Mrs Murray
6
7 I am sending you a few pamphlets which I think you will find bear on
8the subject you mention.
9
10 With the 10/- you sent I will send you a copy of Brailsford War &
11Steel & Gold
which bears strongly though indirectly on the matter it's
12a fine book & costs 4/6 only & I'll try & get another book by next
13week. I have shall also send you Norman Angells last book & Shaw's
14paper. I am so glad to know you are safe at home again. My husband
15wrote with much pleasure of his meeting you at De Aar. Give my best
16love to all the dear ones. How glad I would be to see you all again,
17but when my husband writes me of the climatic conditions at De Aar I
18feel I must wait.
19
20 Yours ever
21 Olive Schreiner
22
23 PS. When any of you write please address c/o Standard Bank
24 10 St Clement's Lane
25 Lombard St
26 London
27 E.
28
29
30
Notation
The pamphlets sent with this letter are likely to have been anti-war ones. The books referred to are: Henry Noel Brailsford (1914) The War of Steel and Gold: A Study of the Armed Peace London: Bell; Norman Angell (1909) The Great Illusion: A Study of the Relation of Military Power to National Advantage London: William Heinemann.; George Bernard Shaw (1914) 'Common Sense About the War' New Statesman 14 November (Special War Supplement), London: Statesman Publishing.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/15
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 February 1909
Address FromHotel Milner, Matjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Hotel Milner
2 Matjiesfontein
3 Feb 5th 1909
4
5 Dear Mrs Murray
6
7 After I'd sent off my friends letter I wondered if I ought to show a
8letter that was so very private; but I'm sure she would not have
9minded my showing it to you if she knew you. Will you please return it
10in the enclosed envelope. I do hope if you should be going to Cape
11Town at anytime & pass here you will let me know that I may run over
12to the station & see you. It would be so nice if you could come & stop
13at the hotel for a few days while I'm here. I do not think I shall be
14going down to Parliament this year
15
16 ^Yours very sincerely
17Olive Schreiner^
18
19

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/16
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 October 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Oct 26th 1913
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 I would love to see you here for a couple of days but I am only afraid
7you will find me so ill & dead-&-alive that it will be no pleasure to
8you. I felt it depressed darling Anna Purcell when she was here though
9she tried not to show it. If you do come & stay at the hotel for a
10couple of days it will be delightful to me.
11
12 I sail to Europe on the 6th of December, but will have to go down to
13Cape Town about the 20th of November or perhaps before as the heat is
14becoming very great here. I do wish I could have gone to you if only
15for a couple of days to see you all. You don't know how I love you all
16from your husband down to Bobbie. Some days I am better & some days I
17can just lie on my bed with my eyes half shut.
18
19 I am taking the dear children's karross to England with me & shall
20have it lined with fine dark green cloth & take it all about the
21continent.
22
23 My dear love to you all
24 Olive
25
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/17
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 April 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 April 23rd 1912
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Please tell the children how delighted I am with their lovely gift.
7You don't know how it touches me they should have sent it. It will
8keep me finely warm in the winter wrapped round my knees with my feet
9on my dear little footstool.
10
11 I found it here when I came back. But coming back suddenly to this
12great height completely prostrated me & its only to-day, that I've
13felt able to write even letters. I hope you all had a lovely holiday.
14Did the children ride at the Port Elizabeth races? Is Kathleen growing
15more robust?
16
17 My garden is very lovely just now with simply millions of
18chrysanthemums. I have planted them out side the hedge all round my
19ground, besides all that are in the garden But I have none quite as
20large & fine as I had last year. Next year I am going carefully to
21cultivate a few, & let the rest just grow in vast masses.
22
23 I wish I was able to write all it is in my heart to say about so many
24many things I must put that off till another day.
25
26 Perhaps next spring if you write & tell me you are having very dry
27weather I will be able to run down I just for a few days to see you
28all
29
30 Love to all the dear ones
31 Olive Schreiner
32
33

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/18
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 June 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Address - 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgeware Rd
3 London
4 June 15th 1920
5
6
7 My darling Friend
8
9 Soon you will be losing your Andre, but she will not be going far from
10you, that's the great comfort. Is she to be married in September? Are
11Bobbie & Kathie in Cape Town? I am sailing for Africa on the 13th of
12August - I think the ship is the Dunvegan. I have taken my passage. I
13do hope you will be coming down to Cape Town soon. I do long so to see
14your face.
15
16 You know I dread going out to the Cape. The dear voice & the dear face
17that were always the first to greet me in the Docks when I landed, I
18shall never hear or see again. Africa will never be the same to me
19again he was my great stand by in life. And if ever I go to Graaff
20Reinet there will be another dear & beloved soul missing. But I must
21go. I can't face another winter alone in this room. I don't know where
22I shall get rooms in Cape Town but just for the first days I'll go to
23my little niece Mrs Scott at Birzana Plumstead, & Ruth Alexander is
24looking out to try & find rooms rooms. Perhaps next winter I will be
25able to come up to Graaff Reinet for a little time. Do write & tell me
26all your news. If you able to write when you get this I will still get
27it before I sail in August. If Bob & Kathie are in Cape Town please
28ask them to come & see me if they have time. How is the farming going
29on? How far will Andre be from you?
30
31 Good bye, my dear dear love to you
32 Olive
33
34 I think I told you my dear friend Miss Greene had died of cancer. She
35was so fond of your sister.
36
37

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/19
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date18 September 1911
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Dear Mrs Murray
2
3 I was so glad to get your letter this morning.
4
5 I've not sent your letter to Miss Hyett waiting to write to you first.
6She told me she couldnt accept your invitation if you asked her
7because she had promised to spend her holidays at Xmas with her dear
8friend a Miss Leach whith with whom she lives, & the young man to whom
9Miss Leach is engaged. I wanted her to come to Cape Town if I was
10there but she said she could only come if they were willing to come to
11Cape Town too. So its not much use your asking her unless you could
12invite the other two who would fill up all your house. I shan't be
13able to come dear friend. I wont try the Eastern Province again in
14summer I'll come & see you some day in the winter when you are living
15down at the lower farm!, or in the early spring before the rains come.
16I never seem to have got over all the rain in the Eastern Province
17last summer, it poured all the while at Somerset & at Cradock till I
18came back here in despair. This summer I am going to try Blauwberg
19(the opposite side of Table Bay). My sister Mrs Lewis finds it suits
20her heart better than any place she has staid in. She is trying to get
21me a room in a cottage there where I shall sort of camp, doing my
22cooking on a parafine stove. I feel If that doesn't suit me I don't
23know where I shall go.
24
25 I'm so sorry to hear you've all been so ill. I hope that the sea will
26set you all up. Here the veld is lovely & the weather better than
27usual at this time of year.
28
29 Ruth Alexander didn't come after all. But I had my darling Lyndall for
30two weeks the happiest fortnight I have known for years. I shall spend
31a couple of weeks at my brother's at Newlands & a week with dear
32Minnie de Villiers before I go to Blauwberg. I do wish you were all
33coming there for the Xmas holidays. It's a splendid beach for camping
34out they say! So wild you can go bare foot & do what you like.
35
36 Love to all you dear, dear, people.
37 Olive
38

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/20
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 2 December 1917
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this letter has been derived from the postmark on an attached envelope; Haldane Murray was killed on 16 September 1916 and Oliver Schreiner went to Mesopotamia in 1917. Schreiner moved to Porchester Place in April 1917. The envelope provides the address the letter was sent to.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgeware Rd
3 Saturday
4
5 My dearest Andre
6
7 Thank you for your beautiful long letter. I was so glad, dear to hear
8all you told me about the dear beautiful father, a man among thousands.
9 I am so glad you are with your mother: the farm must be quite all she
10can manage. How I wish I could be with you all for a few days, & see
11you as you are now.
12
13 Give my love to your mother: I am so thankful she has the open air
14farming work: it will be more good for her than anything. Do you go up
15to Port Lock in the summer or stay all the while at the lower farm? I
16hope you will get that little trip to Cape Town.
17
18 We are having pouring endless rain here, this year has been the
19wettest in England for many long years. My little niece Ursula
20Schreiner
who has been nursing in France for a year & half got married
21yesterday. Her husband only got 9 days leave for his wedding & has to
22go back to France on Thursday. My other niece Lyndall is still nursing
23in France close to the front. My favourite & beloved nephew Oliver, as
24I think I told you, was wounded a year ago in the Somme battle. His
25elbow was blown away, & he will never have the real use of his arm
26again. Six months ago he went out to take troops to Mesopotamia. In
27the Mediterranean the ship he was on was torpedoed, 240 were drowned,
28but he was one of the saved. He is now in India, but when he last
29wrote was soon going to Bagdad in Mesopotamia. I sometimes feel we
30shall never see him again.
31
32 Good bye, dear. Give my love to Kathie & Bob & above all to the dear
33Mother.
34
35 Your loving friend
36 Olive Schreiner
37

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/21
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 May 1918
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 May 23rd 1918
2
3 Dear dear friend
4
5 Fred Luscomb called on me & gave me your letter. I liked him very much.
6 I feel he's so good & sincere. I wrote to him the next day to the
7address he gave me asking him to come & see me whenever he could & I
8wrote to tell Mrs Percy Molteno he was in town. She sent me a letter
9to post to him asking him to visit them. But since then (ten days ago)
10neither I nor Mrs Molteno have heard from him. I can't understand it.
11Perhaps he has moved to another address. I fear he will find it very
12hard to find any thing to do here. There are so many thousands of
13officers slightly injured seeking for work, that it will be very
14difficult. One man told me he had 300 men in his list alone whom he
15couldn't find any work for. What they want here are strong young
16fellows, who after two or three weeks training can go as privates into
17the front trenches in France. Of officers they have many too many. I
18do hope he will write to me & I shall see him again. I wanted us to go
19about together a little, & I wanted to hear so much more of you all.
20
21 Isn't it sad about poor young George Murray? He was killed just the
22day 5 weeks after he was married. All the beautiful youth of all
23Europe is dying.
24
25 Good bye my darling friend.
26 My dear love to you all
27 Olive Schreiner
28
29

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/22
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 December 1917
Address Fromc/o Standard Bank, 10 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, London
Address To
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 c/o Standard Bank
2 10 Clements Lane
3 Lombard St
4 London ?E
5
6 Dec 3rd 1917
7
8 Darling Andre
9
10 As happy a Xmas to you all as is possible to you with all the memories
11of the beautiful presence which is with you no more. The other day a
12man gave me an account of the noble way in which he died. It is so
13beautiful to me that he died trying to save life. It was so like him.
14When I think of Africa what my heart hungers most to see, after my
15darling Husband, is your beloved little circle. Did I tell you that I
16heard a story that you were engaged & very soon to be married? They
17said you would be living on the farm next to your mother's, & I felt
18so glad if it was true, that you would not be far from her. Tell your
19mother if ever you children & she have your likenesses taken she must
20send me one. I suspect I should barely know Bob & Kathie.
21
22 Good bye, dear. Yours with endless loving thoughts
23 Olive Schreiner
24
25

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/23
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 January 1910
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Matjiesfontein
2 Jan 16th 1910
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Thank you so much for your letter. Port Lock is my dream land to which
7I hope to get some day! Just now the heat has made me very unfit & I'm
8going to Cape Town again a little to see the Doctor. When I'm quite
9fit you may be sure I'll start off at once!!! to the large table & the
10big room & all the good friends.
11
12 I am sending you Mrs Murray's letter. Please return it to me as soon
13as possible. You may copy extracts from it if you like. Address to
14Matjesfontein as they will send my letters on wherever I am.
15
16 When I am coming, if ever my good dream comes true I shall wire as you
17ask me two days before hand to Mrs Watermeyer.
18
19 I've so much I'd like to write about but the heat is too great.
20
21 Yours ever
22 Olive Schreiner
23
24
Notation
The enclosed letter is no longer attached and was presumably returned to Schreiner as requested.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/24
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 April 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 April 28 '13
3
4 My dear dear friend
5
6 How long it seems since I had any kind of a talk with you. I've been
7very ill all this summer at Cape Town. I hoped to get better when I
8came back here; with the beautiful cool weather we are having, but so
9far I am not able to do much.
10
11 How bad it was of our dear little Andre being so ill. Please write &
12tell me about all of yourselves.
13
14 I expect I should hardly know Bobbie: he must be quite a big lad. What
15of Kathie's eyes: Have the glasses done their good. Can she read to
16herself now with pleasure?
17
18 We have had beautiful rains here, & the veld is nearly green, but the
19drought killed many of my flowers, & I am not able to plant & garden
20again. I am just going to keep my old plants alive by watering. But my
21chrysanthemums are splendid. I wonder how dear old Port Lock looks now.
22
23 Good bye: my dear love to you all
24 Olive
25
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/25
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 December 1919
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgeware Rd
3 Dec 5th 1919
4
5 Dear, dear Friend
6
7 My niece Lyndall Schreiner has married a Colonel Gregg who is in
8command of a Balt. at a place called Tabora in ^Late^ German East Africa.
9 I have an idea that it was near there that our beloved Haldane fell.
10If it was so & his grave is there, anywhere in that part, I know she
11would go to see it & see that it is kepp kept in order. I should love
12to think of her standing beside his resting place. Please tell me if I
13am right. When is our Andre to be married? Do one of you write & give
14me a little news about you all? I suppose Bobbie & Kathie are still in
15Cape Town.
16
17 I think so often of you all, but I am not able to write much: the
18continual attacks of angina pectoris prevent one from walking & that
19weakens one.
20
21 My dear friend Alice Greene is dying slowly of cancer. She does not
22know it is cancer, they have kept that from her, but she knows she
23can't get well. She is staying in a little cottage in Cornwall, & Miss
24Molteno
& her two sisters are staying with her & caring for. It is so
25hard for me that I cannot get down to see her once again. She is a
26splendid woman. My niece only met Colonel Gregg on board ship, & they
27were married the day after they got to Cape Town. All of them seem to
28like him very much & she is blissfully happy. I am only sorry she has
29to go so far away from her mother. I know you will have been sorry to
30hear of dear Dr Purcell's death. It is a terrible blow to Anna who
31loved him so. I've got such tragic beautiful letters from her.
32
33 Good bye dear friend.
34 My love to you all
35 Olive
36
37

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/26
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 April 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 300
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 April 28th 1911
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 I was so disappointed that I did not know you were coming. I still had
7hopes you would come by the morning train & spend the day. I hope you
8all feel better for the change.
9
10 There is a delightful woman at Pretoria - she was long at Johannesburg
11for some months; she is a niece of my friend Ed Carpenter - called
12Miss Ida Hyett. She is greatly devoted to work in the woman's cause.
13She is a musician & teaches music at the girls high school in Pretoria.
14 As the arms of Portlock are so wide I've been wondering whether
15perhaps you would like to invite her to Portlock at Xmas time. She
16would address one of your meetings & I'm sure would be of great help
17to to your woman's work. I'll send you one of her letters from which
18you will see how much in earnest she is. She's quite one of the finest
19franchise women we have in South Africa.
20
21 If you think you might care to write to her I'll send you her address.
22Its getting delightfully cool here, & the weather is perfect, & my
23garden looks lovely - nearly an acre covered with all kinds of
24chrysanthemums. I wish you had seen it - they seem to do so
25wonderfully well here.
26
27 I went to the station yesterday to meet my old friend Mrs Drew, old
28Gladstones daughter. She looks very sad & tired. She is coming coming
29to spend a few days with me here. I can't make her comfortable but
30she'll put up at the hotel which is very good. The Governor & his wife
31were there too. She's a very nice little woman, so girlish looking,
32but when-ever I looked at him I thought of Con Lytton & the forced
33feeding! He invited me to go & stay with them at Pretoria; but I told
34him Pretoria doesn't suit my health, which is quite true.
35
36 Love to all the dear children & Mr Murray & yourself above all.
37 Olive
38
39
40
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/27
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date9 August 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Aug 9th 1912.
3
4 Dear Andre
5
6 I wonder how you are all getting on: if you are still down at the
7lower farm or back at Port Lock. Here is quite hot today. I love my
8beautiful rug you children sent me so much. It makes my little sitting
9room look quite cosy. I have it on the sofa. I wonder if you are going
10again to your Aunts next Holidays & if I shall perhaps see you as you
11pass.
12
13 I suppose Bobbie & Kathie will be quite grown & changed when I see
14them next.
15
16 I'm afraid I can't come to Port Lock because its so high for more than
17a few days; but I'm going to find out about the Cawoods' farm, if its
18a thatched roof, & if its not so high, & perhaps I shall go there next
19summer & then I shall be able to come & see you too for a couple of
20days. Give my love to every one unreadable dear old Can Kathie read to
21herself now?
22
23 Your very loving friend
24 Olive Schreiner
25
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/28
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 October 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Oct 29th 1910
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Thank you for your kind letter. I had meant to leave on the 15th. But
7the heat is so great here I think it will have to be Friday the 11th &
8I shall get to Graaff Reinet on the 12th. I'm not sure if my husband
9will be able to come with me, he has so much important business He
10thanks you very much for your kind & warm invitation. Please send the
11enclosed cutting back to me at once as I want to send it to Mrs de
12Villiers
&c.
13
14 Shall I bring my hammock with me, is there any place near my room
15where I could tie it up? Its a very nice large Indian one but heavy to
16carry about unless I shall be able to use it. I feel so grateful to
17you for being willing to have me.
18
19 Yours ever
20 Olive Schreiner
21
22 The cutting is from the Transvaal Leader I take it daily. Its much the
23most interesting paper in South Africa.
24
25 ^I will write or wire at once if I make any change in my plans.^
26
27
Notation
The cutting referred to is no longer attached to the letter.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/29
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date10 January 1912
Address FromAlexandra Hotel, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is on printed headed notepaper with a drawing of the hotel.
1 Alexandra Hotel
2 Muizenberg
3 Jan 10th 1912
4
5 Dear Friend
6
7 I want to write you a long letter answering yours. Now I'll only thank
8you for it. How sweet of the beloved children to send me the karross.
9Ask them to send it to De Aar that it may be waiting there for me when
10I come home. I am so well here. I have been here just a week & am
11feeling better than I've done anywhere for 14 years.
12
13 I wish you were coming down here too. Do arrange to come here next
14year this with the cheap fares they have now. But you must take the
15cottage long before hand or you can't get one, its so full.
16
17 My dear friend Isie Smuts is down here, & Minnie de Villiers is down
18here & my brother has a house here so I see them often. A long letter
19soon.
20
21 Much love
22
23^to all
24 Olive Schreiner^
25

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/30
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 August 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Aug 29th 1913
3
4 My dear dear friend
5
6 Writing seems so difficult to me now-a-days or I should have written
7long ago. I shall try to stay on here till the heat drives me away. It
8is quite likely I shall go to England or rather Europe in December.
9Emily Hobhouse will arrive in Africa on the 21st & is returning to
10England on the 24th of December, & she wants me to return in the same
11steamer. But if I go go I shall I fear have to leave not later than
12the 2nd of Dec. because of the heat. She has to unveil the Monument to
13the Boer Women & children at Bloemfontein on the 16th so can't leave
14sooner. I wonder if you went to your gathering at Johannesburg & if it
15was good & you enjoyed it. It will be nice to see Mrs Pethick-Lawrence
16& Mrs Brockhurst in England. But if I go I shall only be in England
17for a few days & then go straight on to Italy. I long for the still
18cool air of the Riviera. How are all the dear children? You don't know
19how often I think of you all.
20
21 Olive
22
23 ^Ruth Alexander is coming on Wednesday to spend a week at the hotel &
24come & see me every day; & the the dear Purcells with Walter &
25Margaretha are coming on the 19th to spend a week at the Hotel; so I
26am going to be quite dissipated. I expect you will have a lovely
27garden at the new farm where you will have no frost to kill your work.
28My garden isn't much this year, but the violets were wonderful. I
29never saw such large fine violets any where.^
30
31

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/31
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date10 April 1917
Address Fromc/o Standard Bank, 10 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1 London
2 April 10th 1917
3
4 My darling friend
5
6 I hope you have got both my letters. Mails to the Cape seem so
7uncertain now. I have written to Alice Greene about the governess.
8(She is staying in England now as is Miss Molteno) & she thinks with
9me there is no chance of getting a governess now till the war is over
10- then she feels sure she would be able to find you one. Write & tell
11me more fully what you need.
12
13 Must she be a BA? Would it do if she had only matriculated or passed a
14good teachers exam? What about would you care to pay?
15
16 I long for more news of you all. Is Kathie stronger. We are having the
17most terrible "spring" ever known in England. Continual snow; we had a
18heavy fall yesterday & the ground is white, & the wind cuts like a
19knife. Some people say it is the cutting of the Panama canal which is
20drawing the gulf stream away & changing the climate of England.
21
22 I have been worse this winter than I've ever been before. Isn't it
23strange how one goes on living when you are no more use in the world.
24I thought last year I could not be alive now, & still it goes on. It
25is not death one fears, nor suffering but being of no use to any one.
26
27 I often see dear Betty Molteno, but not many other people. Alice
28Greene
is living with her family at Harsten near Cambridge.
29
30 I often see in my mind's eye all your dear faces, the dear face that
31has gone forever & the dear old Portlock with you all so bright &
32happy there.
33
34 I long so once again to see the blue sky of Africa, but I know now it
35will not be. If it had not been for the war & I could have gone with
36my treatment at Nauheim, & I stayed in Italy for the winter, it seems
37to me I might have got better. But what a small thing ones own life
38seems when one thinks of all the suffering & anguish going on in the
39world. My two beloved nieces are still nursing in France. Oliver my
40beloved nephew, nephew who was wounded & won won the Military Cross
41has sailed for India to take command of some troops there. He is a
42Captain.
43
44 Give my dear love to all the children & ask Andre to write me.
45
46 Oh my beloved friend how I realize your great loneliness without Him.
47
48 Olive
49
50 Address as before
51 c/o Standard Bank
52 10 Clements Lane
53 Lombard St
54 London
55 E.
56

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/33
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 July 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 July 6th 1912
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 It seems so long since I had any news of you all.
7
8 My sister Ettie passed away after seven months of the intensest
9anguish I ever saw a human being suffer. When I went down to her
10funeral my Husbands mother was very ill & died also suffering much.
11She was buried the same day as my sister. I saw Mrs ?Muller in town
12for a moment & wanted very much to come ^go^ & see her, but was not able.
13 My heart has been very bad ever since I came back, but the last three
14days I am better.
15
16 Write & tell me your news. My husband has just been up for a trip to
17the Victoria Falls, & enjoyed it immensely. My niece Lyndall is now
18studying law. She has to get up in the dark every morning & to have
19her bath & breakfast to be in time to be in town by 8 o'clock when the
20first lecture begins. I shall be very glad if she gets through. Oliver
21my nephew has just come out from England for the long vac - but little
22Ursula wished to remain as she is only going to be there three years &
23he four. She is doing so well at college, but she has set her heart on
24being a nurse, for which I am sorry. But she may change her mind
25before the time comes.
26
27 We have had a big hail storm here, the biggest but one I have ever
28seen in my life. It entirely destroyed all my flowers. Are you down at
29the lower farm. I wish I could come & see you in the winter Graaff
30Reinet must be lovely. So different from the endless cold cutting winds
31we have here. But asI don't like to leave in the winter, because I
32can't stay here in the summer. I have promised if I am well enough to
33go to Bloemfontein in the October to attend the dry farming Congress.
34Can't you come too? It would be so lovely to have you with me dear
35friend! I've never heard from Miss Hyett since she was with you,
36except one short note. Can you remember her address? I want to write
37to her.
38
39 Lady Constance Lytton is terribly ill. The last time she was in prison
40& force feed seems to have broken her for-ever. A particle from the
41worn-out heart has got into one of the arteries in the brain - she had
42a stroke & has not been able to speak for a month, all her face is
43drawn on one side, & she cannot move the arm & leg on one side. Its
44very terrible for those of us to whom she stands as the noblest purest
45woman-soul we have ever known. The doctors say the particle may be
46absorbed in time & she may be able to move about but she will never be
47able to stand the least excite again, as there will always be the
48danger of particles from the worn out heart breaking off again &
49getting into the circulation.
50
51 I saw much of dear Jessie Innes when I was in town. Her daughter
52Countess Von Molke with her husband & three lovely children are
53spending some months with her. Her daughter is so sweet & simple &
54unchanged, just as she was when a little girl.
55
56 Give my warm love to the darling children
57 Yours ever & ever
58 Olive
59
60 Dear old Minnie de Villiers has gone to visit her mother Mrs Drummond
61at Somerset East. It was so hard that I wasn't well enough to get down
62to the station as she passed to see her. She was here an hour. But I
63hope I shall see her when she comes back. Do you still see Votes for Women?
64
65

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/34
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday June 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content.
1 De Aar
2 Friday
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 Thank you so much for your letter. I have a very lovely rose in my
7garden & want to order more. It is now in full bloom with dozens of
8large crimson flowers. I don't know what it & so can't order. It is
9more like Reine Marie Henriette that you have than any other rose I
10know but it is darker I think. But did you not tell me that Reine
11Marie Henriette only bloomed for a short time. This blooms practically
12the whole year round. But it is growing in a very warm sheltered
13corner with walls on both side two sides & full sun. Do you think that
14might make it bloom more perpetually? I enclose a rose.
15
16 My husband is away in Cape Town. His mother is near death ^they think.^
17He returns to-day tomorrow having been away a week. She has had a
18stroke. My sister Mrs Lewis is also struggling at the door of death:
19it seems she cannot die. Her sufferings are too awful. She has been
20two years practically dying. She has four nurses as some one must
21always hold her up. Consumption is a terrible thing; but it doesn't
22compare with Heart Disease. My dear Constance Lytton is lying
23unconscious too. A clot formed of the matter of her decaying heart
24shashas stuck in the brain. I cannot tell you how anxiously I am
25waiting for next weeks mail. My dear friends the Pethick Lawrences
26have got 9 months. But they suffer in a great cause.
27
28 Good bye my dear friend. Love to the darling children. What a joy it
29would be to see you all. Are you still at Portlock or down at the
30lower farm?
31
32 Yours ever
33 Olive
34
35 The rose is not a real creeper like Scarlet Rambler for instance but
36it sends out with long shoots it seems to need supports.
37

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/35
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 October 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 294-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Oct 7th 1910
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 We were both so very sorry Mr Murray did not get in. So many of the
7best men have fallen out.
8
9 Are you going to Cape Town still for the opening?
10
11 I am sending some books on the woman question. How do things prosper
12at Graaff Reinett. I hope the f Society the woman has started in Port
13Elizabeth is doing well.
14
15 I should much indeed like to come & see you but as I have to go away
16soon for the summer I can't afford to take short trips for pleasure.
17It is very terrible this having to leave my home & husband for months
18every year in a country like Africa where there is no provision for
19people wanting change & fresh air except at the sea side where I find
20it so difficult to live. If I came & your farm suited me, would it be
21possible for you to have me for a month or two as you offered last
22year? Please tell me quite straightly. I know you a governess & other
23children staying with you now & may have too full a house, & my great
24fear is always being a tie on friends. Even if one is paying something
25for ones board they may feel they want to go away & don't like to
26because you are there. If you can't have me do you know of any farm
27high & cool in your part of the world where they would have me to
28board, giving me a cool room, or where I could hire a cottage or two
29outside rooms. I live principally on milk sour milk & a little sweet,
30so if I could buy bread I could easily do for myself. This problem of
31where to go in the summer is so trying that if it were not for my
32husband I should leave South Africa forever.
33
34 My book on the woman question will be out in a few months time.
35
36 Have you read a lovely book called "Rebel Woman" by Eveline Sharp?
37I've sent my copy to Minnie de Villiers & Anna Purcell but when they
38return it will send it to you if you've not read it. I am so anxious
39for the post to come today that I may see an account of my brother
40Will's & Mrs Alexanders speeches last night.
41
42 My dear niece Lyndall Schreiner has come back for good having ended
43her three years at Cambridge. She is a very strong suffragette & will
44be of help to us in Africa. I am so glad you've got a good governess
45for the children. It is so much better than going to school.
46
47 Dear Anna Purcell is going to have another little one ^in February^ so
48can't do much suffrage work just now.
49
50 Good bye. We are both so very sorry Mr Murray did not get in.
51
52 Olive Schreiner
53
Notation
Schreiner?s 'book on the woman question' is Woman and Labour. The other book referred to is: Evelyn Sharp (1910) Rebel Women London: A. C. Fifield. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/36
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 May 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 May 7th 1913
3
4 My dear Andre
5
6 I am so glad to hear you are really better. With regard to writing.
7Your father is I think quite right. The mere desire to write is like
8the desire some people have to talk. They will talk: (note some men in
9parliament who will get up & talk though they have nothing worth
10saying!) Such people are a curse to all about them, & it worse when a
11person has a desire to write with nothing really that humanity needs,
12nothing new or wise or beautiful to say.
13
14 Some people of course are born with a desire to express certain things.
15 Some people are born who always have stories or poems coming into
16their heads whether they want or not; & they generally feel a desire,
17though not always to make them as it were permanent to themselves by
18writing them down. Whether these things are good or worth giving to
19the world depends entirely on the nature in which they have grown. A
20deep passionate much-feeling nature with will if it rightly expresses
21its own feelings, also be expressing who what thousands or millions of
22others feel, if a little less; & it will give the world great joy as
23poets do.
24
25 A person with a great intellect who thinks deeply & sees far into life,
26 thinks that others can see clearly or understand of themselves, makes
27forlife for its fellows a nobler & better thing if it expresses what
28it sees. But no person can ever write anything more beautiful or wise
29or great than what is in themselves. Merely to write, for the sake is
30writing is the poorest way in which a person can spend their life;
31they had much better make good bread, or nurse a sick person, take
32care of sheep.
33
34 The great rule is - never write for the sake of writing - write only
35when you feel there's something in your brain or heart you must
36express, & if that be really great or true or beautiful then it will
37be worth writing. All that you learn, I don't mean only in school but
38of life & the world about you, will help to make your nature richer &
39fuller: I think the right words come if the feeling & the thought is
40there.
41
42 Whenever you try to write write just out of yourself. Don't try to
43imitate any one or even any book; write what you think & feel.
44
45 Monday. I wrote so far some days ago but wasn't able to finish dear.
46I'll write another day & tell you about my writing & how I began. My
47great advice to you if you feel you want to write, is to read only the
48best books as far as possible & above all poetry. Not because you may
49ever want to write poverse, but because the poets have been some of
50the men who have felt most keenly about words & the most beautiful or
51true way to use them.
52
53 Read the Bible & Shakespeare a great deal, & learn some of the long
54passages of Milton by heart.
55
56 ^Good bye dear. Your loving friend
57 Olive Schreiner^
58
59

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/37
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 January 1909
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 284-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Matjiesfontein
2 Dec Jan 3rd 1909
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 All good wishes for the new year to you all.
7
8 I have been here about a week now but find the heat very terrible &
9the hotel being practically closed (only the barman & his wife there &
10so dirty no one stan can stay there). I have st to live in two little
11rooms quite by myself. I am so fond
12
13 But never to see a human face or hear a human place is just now more
14than I seem able to stand & depresses me a little. If I really find I
15can't stand it I would like so much to come on to you. But I want to
16ask you something. If I come & spend a week with you, & I find the
17climate suits me & I am able to write would you let me stay on with
18you for a another month, or even for two, till it gets cool but let me
19pay you £5 a month. I know it wouldn't really be paying you at all
20but it would make up for the extra work another person in the house
21gives the servants & if you took the money as pocket money it might
22pay for our going a little trip together to Bedford Beaufort & Alice
23&c & starting branches of our League there when it gets cooler. Write
24& tell me if you can do this. I really couldn't settle down on you for
25two months & not do anything towards all the trouble & expense I
26should be. My dear friend Mrs Cawood used always to do this & she
27always told me if she needed her room for other visitors so I always
28felt myself quite free to write & ask if I could come. I do so want to
29get my book ^novel^ done before I die. I feel that that, & not even
30speeches & working at a society is the real work I can do for women. I
31feel I should be quite happy when I was dying if I had done that. My
32dear friend Miss Molteno thinks I am so wrong not to go to Europe
33where I am so much better & could finish my work, instead of staying
34here in this hot climate which doesn't suit me. She doesn't realize I
35can't leave my husband & go where if he were ill or in need of me I
36couldn't get to him. "He is my children & all of them" as the woman in
37"Tono Bungay" says of her husband. I don't think any woman who is not
38married can realize all a woman feels to her husband. I have loved my
39two brothers & my dear men & women friends so intensely, but yet the
40feeling is different. They all seem still to be other persons; he
41seems to be your real self for whom you would give up & sacrifice
42everything.
43
44 I had such a happy time with the dear Purcells. Her mother & sister
45were staying with them, & they are both such dear women, as sweet as
46Anna & her husband. It is seldom one finds a whole household all so
47united & lovable.
48
49 Good bye. Loving New Year greetings to you all.
50 Olive Schreiner
51
Notation
The novel Schreiner wanted to 'get done' is From Man to Man. The book referred to is: H.G. Wells (1908) Tono Bungay London: Macmillan. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/38
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date30 August 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 288-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Aug 30th 1909
3
4 My dear Mrs Murray
5
6 You will have wondered at my long silence after your kind letter
7asking me to come & visit you; but I have been too unwell to write any
8except absolutely necessary letters. The heat & sand even at this time
9of year are very trying here. I hope your woman's work is getting on
10well in Cape Town from my friends letters I should judge they were
11doing very well I do not know if if we shall go down to Cape Town in
12September, but if we do seeing you is one of the pleasures I look
13forward to.
14
15 About my visit to you; I do not like to leave de Aar while the weather
16is cool enough for it to be possible for me to remain I have to be
17separated from my husband during the heat of the summer, so I don't
18like being away one day when its not absolutely necessary. I have
19written to ask Miss Molteno & Miss Greene about some place called Aud
20"Oud-Kamp" or some such name, a little hotel high up in the mountains
21on this side of Graaff Reinet where they used to go in summer. If I
22should go there instead of Matjesfontein or Basutu-land I will easily
23be able to come on to your part of the world & spend a few days with
24you. It must have been splendid camping out, the dream of my life is
25to possess a large old fashioned tent waggon of my own, & go
26travelling about & even when fixed anywhere always to sleep it in it,
27so that with the flaps up you get the fresh night air & yet are raised
28from the ground. I am afraid I am not a very civilized person, I like
29life & work in the velt & the open air so much better than between
30four walls. On the farm when I was first married I was always out with
31my husband rounding up the strays & counting the sheep at the outposts.
32 It was a lovely life. Please thank your husband for his note. It was
33my mistake sending him that paper!! I read in his letter that he want
34an article of mine written since the war on "keep your votes pure."
35The word in his letter must have been races not votes. I couldn't
36think which thing he meant, so sent him that as it refers to votes!
37The article he means I wrote about 19 years ago & published in the
38Fortnightly Review. I am going to republish them in book form soon, &
39will send him a copy. It is written showing our duty to the half-cast,
40but showing also the evil that springs from a mixture of races while
41the men of mixed race are ashamed of their darker ancestors. That is
42why I admire E.K. Soga so. His mother was a Kaffir wo Scotch woman;
43but he always calls himself a "Kaffir" & never tries to pass himself
44off as a pure white man. It is strange how many of the leading & most
45successful men in South Africa have dark blood!!!!! That's the curious
46part of it all! If people with one 4th or one 10th of dark blood can
47say they will not have a man of half dark & half light blood sitting
48beside them in Parliament, why have not we who have pure European
49des-cent (both our parents coming from Europe) the right to say "We
50will not sit with you! You are not of pure European descent"!!!
51
52 ^Please excuse this hurried letter - I am baking & turning out my
53kitchen today, & I have only a rough Kaffir girl to help me who can
54only scrub & clean the pots &c.
55
56 Yours ever, hoping we shall yet see more of each other.
57 Olive Schreiner^
58
Notation
The article in the Fortnightly Review on 'mixed race' is Schreiner's 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa By A Returned South African No 3: The problem of slavery', published in 1893. Schreiner published her 'Returned South African' essays in various journals between 1891 and 1898. A set of them was to have been published as 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa'; however, although prepared for publication, a dispute with a US publisher and the events of the South African War prevented this. They and some other essays were posthumously published as Thoughts on South Africa. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/39
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date27 June 1911
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 302
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 June 27th 1911
2
3 Dear Mrs Murray
4
5 My trip to the Falls was too splendid, but I've been in bed ever since
6I came back with bronchitis. I only got up yesterday I wanted to write
7& tell the children about the wonderful trip, & how we were nearly all
8drowned. The steamer launch we were in ^broke down^ & we were drifting
9into the falls when some natives in canoes came & saved us.
10
11I'll write as soon as I can.
12
13 No, dear friend, I don't want to have anything directly or indirectly
14to do with the Woman's Enfranchisement League. I'll explain to you
15when I can write why.
16
17 Dear Ida Hyett is coming the end of this week from Pretoria to spend a
18week at the hotel to see me. Its a great joy. I only hope I will be
19well enough to make the visit a little bright for her. Her address is
20304 Prinsloo St, Pretoria but you'd better write to her here, to my
21care & I'll send it on if she's gone.
22
23 Anna Purcell goes to England next month I think by the same steamer my
24brother & his children go by. I do hope Andre is going to use her
25wonderful abilities & real intellect & study to fit herself for some
26profession. It doesn't stand in the way of marriage, it helps towards
27a wise happy marriage.
28
29 I am so thankful our dear little Kathie escaped the terrible danger of
30her eye being permanently injured. I've so much to say but can't say
31it now.
32
33 Love to all.
34 Olive Schreiner
35
36 There was a cousin of your husbands, a Mr J. Murray, such a charming
37man with a charming wife in the train going to the falls. He's an
38attorney.
39
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/40
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 July 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 July 23rd 1911
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 I am sending you Ruth Alexander's speech at Kimberley. Please when
7you've read it send it on to
8
9 Miss Ida Hyett
10 304 Prinsloo Street
11 Pretoria
12
13 The reason why I have wished to have nothing to more directly or
14indirectly with the WEL is that Mrs Solly will will persisted in
15writing to me. To over two years ^& six months^ except 2 Post Cards
16which it was absolutely necessary to write I have containing only a
17couple of words I have persisted in leaving all her letters un
18answered. She persists in writing to me continually vilifying all the
19members of the committee who are my dearest friends & attacking my
20niece &c &c. I up simply tear up her letters & throw them in the fire.
21I wrote one long letter a few two months ago telling her just what I
22thought of her behaviour, but I also burnt them. I want to do nothing
23that can give her any ground for writing to me again. It would take
24too long to tell you how she has acted - but my health is not strong &
25I know I have not very long to go on, & I couldn't expose myself to
26being written to by her any more. I do wish my niece was not secretary
27of the society. I have tried to induce her to give it up - but all the
28members of the committee implore her to remain. Perhaps I am going to
29get up a large woman's meeting here next month when Mr & Mrs Alexander
30come again, but it will be a free meeting not connected with any
31particular society. Mrs Alexander is coming to stay for a few days at
32the hotel as I have no spare rooms & can't make anyone comfortable in
33my tiny house, & when Mr Alexander comes down from Kimberley, he may
34stay the night here to address the meeting. I shan't speak - but I'll
35have to get it up, & of course it all depends on how fit I am.
36
37 I hope the darling children are all keeping well & strong. I long to
38see you all so much. I enjoyed Ida Hyett's ?9 days stay here very much.
39 She's a noble sincere, straight forward woman. She stayed at the
40Hotel but came up every afternoon & evening to see me & played on her
41violin, which she plays so splendidly.
42
43 How splendid the suffragettes in England are winning. It's been a
44glorious fight.
45
46 Much love to you all.
47 Olive
48
49
Notation
The copy of Ruth Alexander's speech sent with this letter is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/41
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday April 1909
Address FromEastbergholt, Tamboer's Kloof Road, Gardens, Cape Town
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to address and content. Schreiner stayed at Eastbergholt in Cape Town for part of April 1909.
1 Eastbergholt
2 Tamboer's Kloof Rd
3 Cape Town
4 Friday
5
6 My dear Mrs Murray
7
8 I have been so busy finishing off a little book on the woman question
9I am sending to England. (copying it & writing an introduction.) that
10& I've so unwell since I came here I have been hardly anywhere & seen
11hardly any one. I have not yet once been to "the House". As soon as it
12is done & sent off which I hope will be next Tuesday I will come & see
13you. Please let me know not only your address but at which part of Sea
14Point I must get out of the train to get to you. Your husband told
15mine you had a cold. I hope you are all fit again. I am longing to
16have a long talk with you & shall
17
18 ^like so to see the children.
19
20 Yours ever
21 Olive Schreiner^
22
23
Notation
The 'little book on the woman question' referred to is Woman and Labour.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/42
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1906 ; Before End: 1910
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Content also indicates Schreiner was in Cape Town when it was written.
1 Dear Mrs Murray
2
3 I had a bad attack of angina to-day & was so prostrate I could do
4nothing. And Mr Schreiner is gone upcountry, so I had no one to take a
5wire for me. I'm so sorry I couldn't come.
6
7 I hope I shall be able to be at the meeting on Monday. Get all the
8young unmarried men & women you can to come, but no old married ones.
9
10 Yours ever
11 Olive Schreiner
12
13 Mrs Alexander is such a splendid woman. She is going to speak at the
14meeting too.
15
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/43
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1911 ; Before End: 1912
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Content also indicates Schreiner was in Cape Town when it was written.
1 Address to De Aar as I am back on Thursday
2
3 Dear Andre
4
5 I am so sorry to hear you have been so ill. I hope you don't feel any
6weakness from your illness still. I was hoping so I would see you here.
7 My love to the dear children. I'm delighted to hear they rode so well
8at the races My niece Lyndall Schreiner rode at the races here & won
9two prizes.
10
11 She is my brother Will's eldest daughter who is studying law, as I
12think I told you. She passed her first LLB exam last Xmas, & will take
13her final next year. Then we will have to fight a big fight to get the
14parliament to pass a law allowing women Barristers to practice. You
15must all help us. My youngest niece Ursula is doing very well with her
16legal ^medical^ studies at Cambridge She is coming out to this country
17in June for a visit.
18
19 Good bye dear. Write to me sometimes & give me news of
20
21^all the family.
22
23 Your most loving friend
24 Olive Schreiner^
25

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/44
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLettercard
Letter Date22 January 1914
Address FromHotel Prince de Galles, Mentone, France
Address ToBroederstroom, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner lettercard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner has misdated this letter-card as 22 December 1913 (the day before she landed in Britain from South Africa), when it should be 22 January 1914. The hotel’s name and address are printed on the back of the card, with the address it was sent to on its front.
1 Mentone
2 Dec 22nd 13
3
4 Dear Andre
5
6 We are here in the ice & snow. It is the cold winter known Europe for
7many years. I am going back to Florence in three week's time to try
8the doctors treatment unreadable Address to Poste Restante Florence
9Italy when you write.
10
11 My dear love to all of you.
12 Olive Schreiner
13
14
15

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/45
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Friday 1907 ; Before End: 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Content indicates Schreiner was in De Aar when this letter was written. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time. The start of the letter is missing.
1 No I shall not be going to Bloemfontein. I had meant to leave for Cape
2Town next week as the heat is getting very great here; but I am just
3staying that I can look after things & so make it easier for Cron to
4go. Aren't you coming to Cape Town this summer?
5
6 Good bye, dear friend.
7 Love to you all.
8 I'll write a real letter soon.
9 Olive Schreiner
10
11 Friday
12
13
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/46
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Thursday January 1909 ; Before End: 1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Content indicates Schreiner was not in De Aar when it was written. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 Thursday
2
3 Dear Mrs Murray
4
5 I missed you so much when you were gone. It was nice to see you &
6Andre. Mr ?Mac Caly drove over this morning & asked if I'd care to go
7over tomorrow if he sent the cart in the morning; he said he would
8bring me back in the afternoon so I'm going.
9
10 I met Mrs "Mienner" (I don't know how the names spelt) yesterday for a
11few moments. They are going to Aliwal. Otherwise I've not seen any one
12since you went. Mrs ?Stretches little girl is ^for the present^ all
13right again & going back to school. The doctor says its her heart -
14poor little thing. The little white boy is going in on his bicycle &
15I'm just writing a line hurriedly to send with him.
16
17 Love to all at Portlock. The people are very kind here. My heart has
18been rather bad the last two days I suppose with working. I mean to
19try & stick to my work here for two months & then at the beginning of
20April go for a two months spree before I return to De Aar. I haven't
21had a "spree" for so many years.
22
23 Love to everybody including Chipsie & ?Piexie.
24 Olive Schreiner
25
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/47
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date10 July 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 I am sending you Lady Constance's little paper. I don't know if I sent
2it you before. There is a splendid article by her brother in this
3weeks "Votes for Women" which I will ask Mrs Mrs Purcell to send on to
4you.
5
6 Affectionate greetings,
7 Olive Schreiner
8
Notation
No little paper' by Constance Lytton appeared in Votes For Women in the issues around the date of this letter. The 'splendid article' by Lytton's brother is: "The Earl of Lytton on Votes for Women at the St James's Theatre, June 15." Votes for Women 18 June 1909, pp.817-9.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/48
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Monday October 1909 ; Before End: November 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed on the Murrays's farm at Portlock from December 1909 to January 1910.
1 De Aar
2 Monday
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Thank you for your very kind letter I think I will accept your kind
7invitation & come in a couple of weeks time. I will stay first for a
8few days, & if it doesn't suit me I can then go & try Hermanus. But I
9feel so hopeful f of being able to stay with you because the place
10that f the place in Africa that suits me best is a farm in the Cradock
11district high up in the mountains. I am always perfectly well there,
12but they can't take me there as there is only a young man living alone
13there. But I fancy its more sheltered from the wind than Portlock. You
14get absolutely no north or west wind here. We've tried to buy the farm
15but they don't want to sell it.
16
17 It will be so delightful to have the company of the dear children. I
18do miss having no children about me here.
19
20 Yes, they used the religious point mercilessly about my husband too.
21It is so sad to me that many of our best & most enlightened men will
22not be in the new parliament. I specially wanted your husband in the
23Provincial council because of the Education questions that it will
24have to deal with.
25
26//It would be very nice if we could go together & have meetings at one
27or two place.
28
29 Please give me again the address of the gentleman in Graaff Reinet you
30said I was to wire to. But I will try & write & tell you when I am
31coming in good time.
32
33 My husband says he will try & come with me as far as Graaff Reinet,
34but he will have to return by the next train & cannot come out to the
35farm. How many hours are you from Graaff Reinet? It the farm in the
36direction of Murrays-Burg or of Aberdeen? The time table is rather
37puzzling but it seem that if we arrive in Graaff Reinet on Saturday
38^midday^ my husband may will not be able to leave before Monday morning
39about 5 o'clock? I will have to sl bring a good many things books &
40papers &c &c if I am staying for some time, but I could leave them in
41Graaff Reinet till there was a chance of getting them out to the Farm,
42& just take what was necessary till I know if I shall be able to stay.
43
44^I do hope so. Thank you so much for your kind letter.
45
46 Olive Schreiner^
47
48 ^My husband is away in Cape Town now visiting his Mother. I have told
49my little niece to send you "Rebel Woman" which I lent to her. My
50niece is so strong on the woman question she will be a great help to us.^
51
52
53
Notation
The book referred to is: Evelyn Sharp (1910) Rebel Women London: A. C. Fifield.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/49
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date14 March 1911
Address Fromna
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 Thanks for letter. Am not able to write. Heat & damp great here.
2Leaving for Cradock tomorrow. Address Poste Restante Cradock. I will
3have them sent on to what ever farm I am at. I am going to try that
4little farm high up in the mountain.
5
6 Alles ten Besten to all from Mr Murray to Bobs.
7 OS
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/50
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Friday February 1911 ; Before End: March 1911
Address FromSomerset East, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content and when Schreiner was in Somerset East.
1 Somerset East
2 Friday
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 I send you Minnie de Villiers letter about Lady Innes & Emily Solomon.
7If they dont take care Mrs Solly will slip in. You Graaff Reinett
8women ought to write proposing Mary Sauer; I am going to write
9suggesting her to Minnie if they can't get Emily Solomon. I am very
10happy here & well, everyone is so kind. I am going to spend Monday at
11Mr Brown's farm.
12
13 Give my love to Kathie & Andree. Tell them I'm sorry not to be there
14to see them ride.
15
16 I write in haste to catch post.
17 Olive Schreiner
18
19

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/52
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Sunday 1906 ; Before End: 1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated approximately by reference to content. The address is provided by content and archival location.
1 Sunday
2
3 Dear Friend
4
5 Both my husband & I like Mr Murray's speech so much. It is not only
6sound in view; but the tone & spirit is so fine.
7
8 I am so sorry Tucker doesn't help for your hay-fever. There is nothing
9so bad for it as the smell of thatch & ripe grains. We are having our
10first cold weather here & it does one such good.
11
12 My love to all the dear little people & to the parents & Miss ?Hanstay.
13
14 Yours ever
15 Olive
16
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/53
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This note has been approximately dated by reference to content. Ruth Alexander was in New York visiting her parents in 1913.
1 (A Montessori Mother, by Dorothy Canfield Fisher)
2 I think this would be a book both you & Andre would read with interest.
3 Ruth Alexander who has gone on a unreadable visit to New York is
4going to study the system while there & bring out out any appliances
5there are that she may teach her own little girls.
6
7 Olive
8
9
Notation
The book referred to is: Dorothy Canfield Fisher (1913) A Montessori Mother London: Constable and Co.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/54
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: January 1920 ; Before End: August 1920
Address Fromc/o Standard Bank, 10 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, London
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The year has been written on in an unknown hand. Schreiner left Britain for South Africa in August 1920, and thus the dating indicated.
1 Address c/o Standard Bank 10 Clen Clements Lane Lombard St London
2
3 My dear Friend
4
5 Thank you for your splendid long letter. When you go to Cape Town do
6go to see my dear little sister-in-law, & also her daughter Ursula
7(Mrs Ralph Scott) who lives at Plumstead close to the railway station
8in the house which used to Mr Frank Jouberts. So our darling girl is
9really going to married in September! I am so glad she will still be
10near you. What a lucky, lucky man her husband will be. Thank you for
11all the news about Bobby & Kathie.
12
13 How I should love to come & see you if I ever return to Africa - but
14all is uncertain & dark before. My nephew & his wife want me very much
15to go back with them to Africa as I am so utterly alone a here, I have
16not even a friend who could arrange about my funeral if I were to die
17here. It would be so beautiful to be near my dear little sister in-law
18& all of you my dear dear friends; but I don't know where I could ^stay &^
19go in the summer to escape the heat. In the winter I would be all
20right; though I don't know that the summers are much hotter in Africa
21than here - they are only longer. If it had not been for the war & I
22could have lived in Italy in my beloved Riviera, which is just life to
23me, & have gone every year to Nauheim for the heart treatment, I
24should I'm perhaps sure have got so well I was able to work - & its
25only work that really matters. But all has to be as it must be - these
26terrible five long years shut up in a London room with bad & little
27food, little light & little fire one must just accept as one does all
28else life brings. The one bright spot was that my brother was here,
29though I didn't often see him.
30
31 My dear husband has given up his business at de Aar, he had influenza
32& then rheumatism & couldn't stand it any more. He is coming to
33England in May for a few weeks & then going on to America - he feels
34he must have change & rest. I am so thankful he is getting away, & oh
35what it will be to me to see him again for a few weeks.
36
37 I may have to come back to South Africa, as f life is getting more &
38more insupportable except for people with three or four hundred a
39years prices are still rising. Unless the government can do something
40to stop it there will be a revolution here very soon.
41
42 I will write & tell you as soon as my plans are clearer. You know of
43course that dear Alice Greene is dying of cancer? She is down in
44Devonshire & Miss Molteno & her ^Alice's^ two sisters are nursing her in
45a little cottage near the sea. She is getting very so weak she has to
46be carried on a stretcher from her bed when they take her out & the
47end cannot be far off now. She is sweet & brave.
48
49 You know of course that my dear friend Anna Purcell has lost her
50husband! It is partly to see her that I long so to go to Africa. He
51died of heart disease. Her heart seems broken, but she has her three
52dear children to live for. She did love him so.
53
54 Good bye dear. I'll write again soon.
55 Love to all the dear children. What a joy to see them.
56 Olive
57
58
59

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/55
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday May 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed with Isie and Jan Smuts in May 1910.
1 De Aar
2 Saturday
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 I was so glad to see your hand-writing again.
7
8 I am leaving for a short visit to the Transvaal on Wednesday to stay
9with the Smutses & Lady Innes. I shall be gone till about the 15th. If
10Miss E. Murray comes after I am back I shall be so delighted to have
11her, & will try to get up a little meeting in my study for her to
12speak to about her work.
13
14 I still hope I'll come to you some day.
15
16 My husband is standing again for Beaufort West, but Charlie Molteno &
175 others are standing against him. Please send this note to Miss E
18Murray or give her my message. Ask her if she would like me to try &
19get some situation for Miss Cloete at Pretoria. What kind of work she
20could do &c. &c.
21
22 Much love to you dear friend
23 Olive Schreiner
24
25 ^Excuse haste - I'm busy baking & getting the house right before I go.
26I always like to leave it clean & straight from the store-room to the
27study.^
28
29

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/56
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1911
Address Fromna
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This note is written on the back of an envelope. The year is provided by the postmark on the envelope, although this is not fully legible; the envelope also provides the address the letter was sent to.
1 The coffee turned up all right.
2 OS
3
4 I shall be leaving for Somerset or Cradock in a couple few days. I
5wish I could see you in Graaff Reinet before I go.
6

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/57
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday February 1911
Address FromOudeberg, Free State
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed in Oudeberg from the end January to the end of February 1911.
1 Oudeberg
2 Monday night
3
4 Thanks, dear Mrs Murray for your letter. The heat here has been
5terrific for three days & nights, but tonight we are having a little
6thunderstorm. Mr ?Rosco has been here for a two days & left this
7evening again for Murray's-burg. He's a very nice loveable fellow. He
8says like you that the people are charming at Murraysburg. I spent a
9delightful day at at St ?Olives, & today Mr Stretch drove Mr ?Rosco &
10myself over to Mrs Enslins as she had invited me. She is a very
11loveable woman, a sort of big mother-heart. Have you tried to get her
12to join your society?
13
14 I hope ?Ian is keeping well. I always look at the old neck at Portlock.
15 If I had a strong telescope I might see you there some evening!!
16
17 I do hope
18 Love to all.
19 Olive Schreiner
20
21
Notation
On 9 February 1911 Cronwright-Schreiner wrote to Mrs Murray (Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/7) having received a letter about Schreiner’s visit to her, as follows:

P.O. Box 24,
De Aar, C.C.
9th Feb. 1911

My dear Mrs Murray,

Thank you so much for your kind and prompt letter which came this morning. The news you give is indeed pleasant and reassuring. It is curious how constant change suits her. I am doubtful whether there is any place where she will ever be well permanently. She can be and look so well, when she has a fair chance. Her time with you must have been a very pleasant one for her, and you must have a delightful place. She is revelling in the baboons now! All wild things appeal to here her. I suppose it is the freedom (or imagined freedom!!) of the life that touches her. I dare say if she were a baboon and saw Mr Murray stalking her with a rifle, there’d be a more direct realisation that a baboon’s life (like a policeman’s) is not a happy one. The little woman should never have to live in a town, with her great love of the country.

With kind regards to you both,
Yours very sincerely,
S.C. Cronwright Schreiner

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/58
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: January 1911 ; Before End: March 1911
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This note has been dated approximately by reference to content.
1 I send the money to Steiner, but they returned it (see enclosed) the
2other man never sent the account for the ^one bottle^. So no doubt Mr
3Murray
paid him to! I think it was 2/- so enclose 9/- Thank Mr Murray
4very much.
5
6
7
Notation
This note concerns a bill or account dated January 1911 (see Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/3), which has written onto it 'This a/c was settled by Mr AH Murray some few days ago.'.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/59
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content.
1 De Aar
2
3 I did send on your letter on to Miss Hyett & am glad I did, as she
4will be delighted to come to you at Xmas time. She can't get enough
5violin pupils at Pretoria. I wonder if there is a good opening for a
6violin teacher at Graaff Reinet She is splendid on the violin.
7
8 I send a couple of stamps for the album.
9
10 I've just got my English mail with such a lot of beautiful letters. I
11live for Wednesdays mail.
12
13 Minnie de Villiers says her meeting at Stellenbosh was very successful.
14 Lyndall went over with her. Colonel Stanford was in the chair: 10 new
15members joined.
16
17 Lady Lock passed down the other day from Kimberley. She is spending a
18short time with my sister-in-law & niece before she returns to England.
19
20 There's no news to give you of myself. My garden is doing splendidly.
21I have one very wonderful dark maroon pansy very doubled & curled. I'm
22going to try & get seed from it & will send you some. I wonder if you
23have all the kinds of chrys, asters chrysanthemums I have? I'd like to
24send you some on the chance you haven't.
25
26 I work in the garden all the time when I'm well enough.
27
28 Love to all you dear people
29 OS
30
31

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/60
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: December 1911 ; Before End: April 1912
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Content also indicates Schreiner was in Cape Town when it was written. Schreiner stayed in Cape Town from December 1911 to mid April 1912.
1 Dear Mrs Murray
2
3 I'm so sorry you are out again.
4
5 We are all going to meet (as many of our ^leading^ members of the
6Women's E League as we know will feel with us) at Mrs Brown's 2 Glebe
7Terrace Rondebosch
at 11 oclock on M Thurs-day morning to ^discuss
8about the question of the petition.^ Can you not come too? Do if you
9can. I am going to try & get my husband & Mr ?Balmsforth to come too.
10Wouldn't your husband come too, to help with his advice.
11
12 Please don't mention the meeting to any one, as we don't want it
13talked of till we what line of action we are going to take. We have
14had the advice of Advocate de Villiers.
15
16 Yours ever
17 Olive Schreiner
18
19 Isn't the heat terrible. Did you like Mrs Alexander's ^speech?^
20
21

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/61
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateApril 1909
Address FromEastbergholt, Tamboer's Kloof Road, Gardens, Cape Town
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed at Eastbergholt in Cape Town for part of April 1909.
1 Dear Mrs Murray
2
3 We are holding a small woman's enfranchisement meeting at my friend
4Mrs (Dr) Murray's at Kenilworth House Kenilworth, on Thursday
5afternoon at 3.30. Will you care to come? ^Mrs Murray & I^ unreadable shall
6will be so glad to see you. Mrs John Brown is to speak.
7
8 Yours very sincerely
9 Olive Schreiner
10
11 Could you drop me a card to let me know if you are able to come
12 Address
13 Eastbergholt
14 Tamboer's Kloof Rd
15 Tamboer's Kloof
16
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/62
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: April 1913 ; Before End: November 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time. Schreiner was in De Aar from April to late November 1913.
1 My dear Friend
2
3 Your letter & Mr Murrays went to my heart. You are the kind of souls
4that have to be taken care of by your friends against yourselves you
5are so good & unselfish like my brother Will.
6
7 Don't keep the town house for me, but if later I feel I must go
8somewhere I'll come to the little cottage at Broederstroom if you can
9have me. I can't get a niece as I have only Miss Hemming ^who could
10have come^ but I'll hire a coloured or white girl, if I'm not so
11helpless as to require a nurse: I don't want a nurse while I can get
12about at all.
13
14 My friends in England are pressing for me to come home & try medical
15treatment, but you know dear friend, I myself don't think it will be
16of any help. My dear friend Emily Hobhouse is perhaps coming out to
17unveil the ^Boer^ Women's Memorial at Bloemfontein. She wants me, if she
18is well enough to come to go back with her in December, because she
19has her little maid with her who could look after us both on the ship,
20& she wants me to go to Florence to the heart Doctor Carloni who has
21so wonderfully brought her back from death to life. My husband says he
22is not going to Europe now & the parting with him will be bitter; but
23it would be better to end on the voyage than to go on as I am now.
24
25 Do Will you be at Broederstroom in the summer or are you going back to
26Portlock? It would be so good to see you all. Your dear children are
27such a joy to me. I am so glad you have a lady doctor. I would have
28written the day before yesterday when I got your letters but I wasn't
29able.
30
31 Thank your dear husband for his note. I shall keep both your letters
32as a precious treasures.
33
34 I am a little better this afternoon: a kind Jewish girl whom I hardly
35know at all brought their cart & took me for a little drive. Riding or
36going in a motor car is the only thing that does me any good - the
37movement relieves the pain so.
38
39 So good bye dear friend
40 Olive Schreiner
41
42
43

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/63
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Tuesday January 1911 ; Before End: September 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Content indicates that Schreiner was in De Aar when it was written. Schreiner stayed in Muizenberg and places near it in January and February 1912.
1 De Aar
2 Tuesday
3
4 Darling Friend
5
6 How sweet of you to think of me so. The reason why I have not written
7is that I wanted to write a real answer to your letter; & have never
8had time. I should love to come to Graaff Reinet now but staying at
9Muizenberg to Jan. & Feb is so terribly expensive I have to save all
10my little pennies for that.
11
12 I am sending a bit of a letter I wrote dear Anna Purcell which will
13explain to a little to you my attitude. I asked her to send it back
14that I might send it you. You know I don't sympathize with Mrs Solly's,
15 but the letter she got was the most insolent & conceited I ever saw
16written by one woman to another. Who is Mrs Catt that she dares to
17write so to other woman. When she has won the vote for American women
18I think she can come & dictate to South Africans. If you or Mrs
19?Miller had written the letter I should have said "Well they are South
20Africans, & they feel all people living in one country have a right to
21dictate to others living in it - though I don't think so." You would
22imagine she was a Queen or an Empress from the way she writes! It is
23just like Mrs Solly might write, only conceited & overbearing. One
24feels ashamed to think of such a woman. If the Queen wrote to me in
25such a way I should leave her letter unanswered. I do not say you are
26wrong my darling friend in joining in supporting the Transvaal & Free
27State basis of franchise. You have your views, & have as much right to
28them as I to mine; but you would never dream of writing scornfully
29ordering me what I was to do.
30
31 It is always such a sad thing to me, the South African women & men too,
32 submit to be dictated to by any one who comes from another country.
33The Dutch with all their faults are nobler than we English in that. I
34believe that in the future that the dividing line between parties in
35South Africa will not be race at all, but the great fight of the
36future will be in trying to defend the more liberal institution of the
37the old Cape Colony, built but by such enlightened Englishmen as Sir
38George Grey
, Sir William Porter, Saul Solomon & others against the
39retrogressive institution of the Republics.
40
41 I often wonder why it is that as soon as they touch public work,
42especially the franchise a certain class of women become so
43overbearing & dictatorial. It is because a slave always tries to
44dominate as soon as he has a chance: He doesn't understand "freedom"!?
45
46 Give my love to the darling children. How I would love to see you all
47again. The week before last I had four of the happiest day I have ever
48spent in my life. My brother Will & his son Oliver who has come out
49here on a visit from Cambridge came to visit me. I felt as if I was a
50little child again, like when I & my sister Ettie used to play at
51having houses & pay visits to each other. Oliver has one of the
52sweetest & most loving natures I have ever known. He writes to me
53every week & there are few young men of 22 at Cambridge who would
54trouble to do that to an old Aunt. Ursula has just started her medical
55studies this month. Lyndall is going on with her law work, but she has
56a bad attack of influenza which will I fear put her back.
57
58 I got a little note this week from darling Constance Lytton written
59with the left hand; the right is still quite paralyzed; so weak &
60shaky, but such a joy to me after the long months of silence.
61
62 Good bye. I wish I could come & be with you at Graaff Reinet. I hope
63your entertainment will be a great success. Don't think I don't deeply
64sympathize with work that's not along my own line. Each soul must take
65its own path, & not dictate to others. Did you read Miss Greenes fine
66paper? It is going to be reprinted in the State.
67
68 Greetings to Mr Murray
69 Olive
70
71 Aren't you perhaps coming down to Cape Town in the summer. Do if you
72can. I shall stay here as long as I possibly can hold out not to leave
73my dear husband but I expect I'll have to go in November or early in
74December.
75
76
Notation
Alice Greene's 'fine paper' cannot be established.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/64
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content.
1 Dear Friend
2
3 I'm very ill. ^They^ I want ^me^ to go to England in December to see if
4the doctors can't do anything for me. I doubt whether I shall be here
5then, but it may be the height here that is making me so bad.
6
7 Would you do something for me. When you are down at ?Bedestrom & are
8quite settled & have time, would you try to find whether I could get a
9nice sunny room with a fireplace or a tiny cheap cottage on the left
10right hand side as you come into Graaff Reinet from Oudeberg, that
11high part you know I liked. Or is there a double story house a little
12lower where I could get a room by the week. I'm too ill to stay with
13friends; & its no use my going to a Hotel or boarding house because I
14can't eat ordinary food any more. I would hire a coloured or white
15girl to stay with me. Graaff Reinet is much lower than this, & I might
16get better there. Perhaps Dr Kegan who was always so kind to me might
17know of a place. Would you send this on to him. I have great
18confidence in him as a Doctor & perhaps he might know of a place where
19I could get a room. I would like it by the week because if I get worse
20there or am as bad as here I'd rather be in my own little home.
21
22 Olive
23
24 ^Don't take the room till I wire I am coming. I may not be able to. It
25there a nursing home at Graaff Reinet? It's my heart that's so bad.^
26
27
28

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/65
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Sunday January 1911 ; Before End: February 1911
Address FromOudeberg, Free State
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed in Oudeberg from the end of January to late February 1911.
1 Oudeberg
2 Sunday morning
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 I've been wondering how you all got back again! I got nicely to Graaff
7Reinet & after dinner had a most glorious two hours sleep in Mrs
8Crumps big, cool, airy, upstairs bedroom. I felt just splendid after
9it. She & Mrs ?Miller were so kind. At 4.30 the cart came for me, & we
10had a lovely drive up with delicious cool South Easter behind us. Mr
11Stretch has two wonderful mules that trot out the whole of this hill &
12want be held in!! I had a very good night. This morning is beautiful &
13cool, & fresh. I went for a walk before breakfast all along the foot
14of the mountain till you get along the to the top of that kloof you
15see from the nek at Portlock. When you come we must go that way. It's
16much nicer that the walks we went. I thought how the children would
17like it - big rocks & trees & hundreds of Baboons calling on the
18mountain side.
19
20 It is beautiful to think you are coming again. I feel quite a lump in
21my throat when I think of dear old Portlock. How can I thank you & Mr
22Murray
for all your great kindness to me! I feel the richer for having
23got really to know you all.
24
25 Of course I can't say how this place will suit me when it gets hot;
26but today the air is splendid. Good bye. There is an opportunity in so
27I must get my letters all done quickly. Give my love to the dear
28children & to Miss Huxley. She's a very sweet girl, when I've "done
29the book" & got the ox waggon I'd like to have her as my companion &
30private secretary to travel about with me! Grand, ah?
31
32 There's a lovely little spring horse waggon here, that Mr Stretch goes
33about trading in with 8 mules I go & look at the waggon with loving
34eyes; but it's not so nice as mine. Its just a bare little tent waggon;
35 but still very nice.
36
37 Yours ever
38 Olive Schreiner
39
40 I send £2/00 because you knew it was a bargain before I came. And, as
41Kathie would say, "You know you must keep your pennies!"
42
43 ^Thanks so much for the lemons. I've just had one.^
44
45
Notation
Schreiner's 'when I?ve done the book' comment refers to From Man to Man.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/66
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date11 September 1920
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner stayed with her niece Ursula Scott, her sister-in-law Fan Schreiner, and her friend Lucy Molteno, in Cape Town after her arrival from Britain on 30 August 1920, moving to a boarding-house in Wynberg in late October, where she was resident until her death on 11 December 1920.
1 Dear Friend
2
3 Are Kathline & Bob now in Cape Town? Could you give me their addresses
4Perhaps they might some time be able to come & see me. I am for the
5present staying with my niece Mrs Ralph Scott, & any letter sent to me
6here will be sent on. When is Andre to be married? When are you coming
7to Cape Town? I do hope soon.
8
9 Much much love to you from
10 Olive
11

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/67
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date24 January 1913
Address FromGrand Hotel, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 Thanks for your letter. Please tell Andre I am staying at the Grand
2Hotel Muizenberg I will be glad to go & see Mrs ?Miller & Mrs Crump.
3If I had known it would be so dry I would have come to you instead of
4coming to the cape.
5
6 Much love to you all
7 Olive Schreiner
8
9 Grand Hotel
10 Muizenberg
11

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/68
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date27 December 1912
Address Fromc/o Schreiner Chambers, St Georges Street, Cape Town
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 Dearest Friend,
2
3 I have been wanting so to write you a Xmas letter but I've been in bed
4with a heart attack for some days & have written to no one. Thank you
5for the very good picture of the three dear small persons. Do try to
6come to Cape Town while I'm here. The sight of your face would do me
7good.
8
9 Address
10 c/o Hon WP Schreiner
11 Chambers
12 St Georges Street
13 Cape Town
14
15 Olive
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/69
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date27 December 1912
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner stayed in Cape Town and places close to it from late November 1912 to mid April 1913.
1 Dear Andre
2
3 Thank you for the pretty card & your letter Loving wishes for you all
4for a good happy new year. It will be lovely if you come to Cape Town!
5You must lett let me know where you are, & some & see me! I am staying
6at my brothers till New Years day when I go to Muizenberg. Address any
7letter you write to c/o Hon WP Schreiner Chambers St George's Street
8
9 ^Much love to you all dear
10 Olive Schreiner^
11

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/70
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter DateFriday 18 February 1911
Address FromRosmead, Middelburg, Eastern Cape
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 Rosmead
2 1.30 Friday
3
4 I have just got here all right the heat is tremendous. I hope you were
5not too late in getting home. I felt anxious as the boy was so
6helpless. So many thanks.
7
8 Love to all
9 Olive
10

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/71
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday April 1909
Address FromEastbergholt, Tamboer's Kloof Road, Gardens, Cape Town
Address To
Who ToA. Haldane Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed in Eastbergholt in April 1909.
1 Eastbergholt
2 Tamboer's Kloof Rd
3 Tamboer's Kloof
4 Cape Town
5 Saturday
6
7 Dear Mr Murray
8
9 I have just this moment got your note, returned from De Aar. I do not
10know which of my little papers you refer to I have send you the only
11one I have with me. I will send you the others when I get home. Please
12return this when you have done with it; as I have only two copies.
13
14 Thank your dear wife for her letter. I do wish she was here. Does your
15farm lie high, & is it pretty cool I should like so much to try some
16day & accept your wife's kind invitation & come to visit you, but if
17it is as hot as Graaff Reinet I fear I cant come.
18
19 ^I wish I could have seen you to have a talk on the native question
20when you were here
21
22 Yours sincerely
23 Olive Schreiner^
24
25
26
Notation
The 'little paper' referred to is probably that on 'mixed race' and is one of Schreiner's 'Returned South African' essays, published in various journals between 1891 and 1898. A set of them was to have been published as 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa'; however, although prepared for publication, a dispute with a US publisher and the events of the South African War prevented this. They and some other essays were posthumously published as Thoughts on South Africa. There was some confusion about which essay Haldane Murray had requested, as Schreiner comments in a letter of 9 April 1909 to Mimmie Murray (Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/38).

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/72
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 October 1914
Address FromThe Windsor, 61 & 62 Lancaster Gate, Hyde Park, London
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 The Windsor
261 & 62 Lancaster Gate, W
3
4 London
5 Oct 12th 1914
6
7 My dear dear Friend,
8
9 I am thinking of you all so often my heart seems to cling closer &
10closer to Africa & all in it the longer I am separated from it.
11
12 Do write to me & tell me all the news about yourselves that I long so
13to know. I hope the garden gives you joy, - what joy is there like the
14peaceful joy of a garden? How does it go with the dear children I've
15been very ill but am better. I am going to a little Hotel in the heart
16of London where I think it will be drier. Oh my anxiety about de Aar &
17my dear Husband. I am thankful your darling Bobbie is not old enough
18to sent to the war to spill his dear young blood on those terrible
19sands. Yesterday we heard of the fall of Antwerp. All the lights are
20darkened in London tonight as they are afraid of the zeplins. The
21fighting is now going on only 60 miles from London as the crow flies -
22though of course it is mostly over water. Oh how I long for news from
23South Africa, & the papers give none. The last news I had was that
24dear old de la Rey had been shot in a motor car. He was a large peace
25loving gentle man. Oh my dear friend I hate war more & more the more I
26see of it. I awaken all the hatred & bitterness & narrowness that lies
27at the bottom of human nature. My brother is still in England. His son
28has joined the English army as an officer my dear beautiful Oliver!
29
30 Good bye; my dear love to you all. Shall we ever meet again, I think
31not.
32 Olive
33
34 Nauheim did me wonderful good, but the last few weeks seem to have don
35undone it all.
36
37 Address c/o Standard Bank, 10 Clement's Lane Lombard Street London, as
38I am moving about. A letter addressed there will always find me.
39

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/73
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1907 ; Before End: 1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated approximately by reference to content.
1 Dear Mrs Murray
2
3 There are two books I am sure you will be much interested to read if
4you have not done so already - a little book costing 1/3 called
5"Woman's Suffrage" by Arnold Harris Matthew & "The Convert" by
6Elizabeth Robins ^costing 6/-^. I think one can get both at the book
7sellers.
8
9 You cannot know how your deep earnestness in this matter has cheered &
10touched my heart. I am sure you will do much good work for women in
11the years that are coming.
12
13 Yours very sincerely
14 Olive Schreiner
15
16
Notation
A book or pamphlet on women's suffrage by Arnold Harris Matthew cannot be traced. The other book referred to is: Elizabeth Robins (1907) The Convert London: Methuen.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/74
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 November 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Nov. 3rd 1912
3
4 Dear Friend
5
6 Did you send me the early rubarb which I got yesterday? It came from
7Graaff Reinet so I expect you must have sent it. Thanks, we are
8enjoying it so.
9
10 The drought here is terrible. I hope your bazaar went off well. Please
11return me
that bit of letter to Anna Purcell. I ought to have marked
12it private. I hope I did as it was only for you.
13
14 I hope you understood dear, my position. I send you a bit of Earl
15Greys sp interview, as you may not have noticed it. You see, he feels
16just [page/s missing]
17
18 He thinks that terrible manhood suffrage in the Transvaal & Freestate
19will hang as a millstone about the neck of the South African
20government; I believe it will yet bathe this land in blood, unless it
21is done away with. I could not do anything that would not strengthen
22it, as it would be strengthened if women were enfranchised the on the
23same evil & rotten basis. I am for adult suffrage in all free
24homogenous suffrage where it means that every adult in the country
25will get a vote: but where it means that a tiny handful of men & women
26shall hold control & government over millions, it is absolutely
27necessary there should be a high educational qualification. When I
28would fight to the last gasp to undo that manhood franchise in the
29Transvaal & Freestate how can I rush to strengthen it by adding women
30to it?
31
32 If there were any change made in the basis of Franchise in the Cape
33Colony I should like to see the Educational test raised not lowered.
34
35 My heart is so bad dear I shall soon have to leave for Cape Town. I
36shall stay at my brother Will's till New Year & then go to unreadable
37Schmidt's Café at Muizenberg where I have taken a room, for two
38months.
39
40 My dear love to you all. I wish you were all coming to Cape Town.
41 Olive
42
43
44
Notation
There is a page or pages missing after 'You see, he feels just'. The 'bit of Earl Grey's interview' referred to is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/76
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1906 ; Before End: 1913
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter can be only approximately dated by reference to content. Content indicates Schreiner was not in De Aar but perhaps in Cape Town when it was written.
1 My dear, dear Friend
2
3 I wish I could see you I fear there's no chance of my coming to you,
4but if ever you are passing De Aar can't you spend a couple of days
5with me.
6
7 I have been worse here than I have ever been before. I return to De
8Aar on Thursday. I have been so grieved to hear my dear little Andre's
9illness. Is Kathie growing stronger as she grows older?
10
11 Good bye. Do write to me.
12 Olive Schreiner
13
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/77
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Tuesday February 1911 ; Before End: March 1911
Address FromGraaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content. Schreiner was in Oudeberg and then Graaff-Reinett in late January to the end of February 1911.
1 Graaff Reinet
2 Tuesday night
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray,
5
6 Mrs Stretch's little girl seemed having a light attack of scarletina
7(I didn't see her as there was no good if I was not nursing her) this
8morning midday at 1.30 Mrs Stretch came in & said she was going to the
9farm with the children & there would be no one at the hotel so in half
10an hour I had to start off flinging my things into the cart, & coming
11down here, as the said they would not let me have another cart
12^tomorrow^ as the man was going to a sale. So here I am to my
13astonishment not knowing where to go or or what to do. My plan is to
14Somerset as Minnie de Villiers mother has wired she is anxious to have
15me. I am thinking of waiting till Friday morning when the train leaves
16via Cradock in the hope you might want to go with me!!
17 If you cared to bring take the trip in the cart I would pay for forage
18&c but I think it would be better to go by train. Miss Berrigh
19?Berringham might be willing to come & stay at Portlock with the
20children I shall have to be in Cradock to go to Lily Kloof for on the
2130th of 28th of February but I have the days between to go to Somerset.
22 Mrs Crump feels sure you can’t come as you are busy getting ready for
23the show so I won’t be a bit disappointed if you can’t come, but I
24felt I must send a boy up with this letter in case you could come.
25
26 It was quite a blow to me having to leave Oudeberg. I loved it so & it
27suited me so well.
28
29 Love to all
30 Olive
31
32

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/78
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date28 April 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToA. Haldane Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from late October 1914 to late July 1915.
1 I sent you a book of Brailsford costing 5/- & one of Norman Angell
2costing 1/- postage 1/- I am sending back a PO order for the other 3/-
3next week as no book sent now will be in time
4
5 Love to all
6 O Schreiner
7
Notation
The books referred to are: Henry Brailsford (1915) Belgium and the ‘Scrap of Paper’ London: Independent Labour Party; and probably Norman Angell (1909) The Great Illusion: A Study of the Relation of Military Power to National Advantage London: William Heinemann.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/79
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date1 April 1914
Address FromItaly
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. On it is a picture of Florence captioned 'Firenze - Una parte del Piazzale Michelangelo, con la Loggetta, La Chiesa di S. Salvatore e la Basilica di S. Miniato'.
1 I think of you all often, my loved friends, though I can't write! The
2Dr 'Cure' here has done me harm not good & I shall soon return to
3England. How I would love to see all your dear faces.
4
5 Olive Schreiner
6
7
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/80
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date14 January 1917
Address Fromc/o Standard Bank, 10 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The addressee and the address this postcard was sent to are on its front.
1 Address
2 Standard Bank
3 Clements Lane
4 London
5 Jan 14 / 17
6
7 Dear, I am always thinking of you all & longing to have news of you.
8Do write & tell me the news about each of you.
9
10 Yours with much much love
11 Olive Schreiner
12

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/81
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date29 May 1915
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from late October 1914 to late July 1915.
1 Its such a long time since I had any news from any of you; but its all
2my fault because I'm so bad at writing! I'm going to write a long
3letter to Kathie soon tell her.
4
5 My dear love to you all.
6 Olive Schreiner
7

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/82
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date30 April 1917
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 I wonder if you are still at home or have gone back to college. Do
2write me one of your delightful long letters & tell me how all goes
3with you all.
4
5 The snow has left off at last here but it is still very damp &
6oppressive. This is the worst climate in the world, & every thing is
7very sad now.
8
9 Love to you all
10 Olive ^Schreiner^
11

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/83
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date8 February 1916
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The recipient and the address this postcard was sent to are on its front.
1 30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace
2 Kensington
3 London
4 Feb 8th 1916
5
6 Thank you, dear, for your most interesting letter. I glad of all its
7news. I hope you will go to Cape Town. It will be lovely when you are
8able to come back & take over the house, & the mother can give all her
9time to the open air work which she loves, as I do. Its quite strange
10to think of Bob as such a big boy. I do long to see you all, and more
11& more as time passes & there seems less & less hope. I think the
12lower farm must be lovely in winter. My nephew Oliver is still away
13fighting in France, & my two nieces are soon going off to Egypt to
14nurse.
15
16 Love to you all
17 Olive Schreiner
18

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/84
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date16 April 1917
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 Dear Andre
2
3 I have just heard the news of dear Ian Benet's death. I wonder if you
4have gone back to College or are still at home. How I long to see you
5all. The weather here is the most terrible ever known in England at
6this time of year, snow & wind, & frost, & rain as if it were the
7depth of winter. When you have time dear write & tell me a little
8about yourselves.
9
10 Love to you all
11 ^Olive Schreiner^
12

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/85
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date22 July 1916
Address FromLlandrindodd Wells, Wales
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner first stayed in Llandrindodd Wells from late July to late October 1915, and then again from mid June to mid September 1916.
1 Dear Andre,
2
3 Do write me one of your nice long letters & tell me all your news. Are
4you going to SA College? How is Kathie?
5
6 My nephew Oliver has been wounded & is in a hospital in France but we
7are hoping he will soon be well enough to be moved to England.
8
9 Much much love to you all
10 Olive Schreiner
11

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/86
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date11 January 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from late October 1914 to late July 1915.
1 Dear Andre,
2
3 I hope all goes well with you. Send me a post card to say if you have
4news of your father if you have no time to write a letter. Be sure to
5address c/o Standard Bank, 10 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, as I am
6going on Monday to live at Hampstead in two rooms I have taken.
7
8 Olive Schreiner
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/87
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date After Start: July 1915 ; Before End: September 1916
Address FromLlandrindodd Wells, Wales
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The addressee and the address this postcard was sent to are on its front. The postmark is not fully legible but the address is Llanrindodd Wells, Wales. Schreiner first stayed in Llandrindodd Wells from late July to late October 1915, and then again from mid June to mid September 1916. The postcard has a colour picture of a lake and hills with the caption: ‘View at Pen-Y-Gareg. Reservoir hayader’.
1 I wish you could see this beautiful country. Its not so grand as our
2South Africa, I think there is nothing so grand in the world anywhere
3but this is so pretty.
4
5 Love to you
6 Olive Schreiner
7
8
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/88
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date11 September 1911
Address Fromna
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 Many thanks dear, for your nice letter. Do write to me sometimes &
2give me all the news, even if I can't write long letters in return.
3
4 I send you a little picture of the Victoria Falls I bought when I was
5there. I like it because it gives a little idea of the mist & haze &
6the rainbows.
7
8 Much love to all. I wish you were going to Cape Town for the holiday
9as I shall be there
10
11 Olive Schreiner
12
Notation
The picture of the Victoria Falls referred to is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/89
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date16 April 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 My dear Friend
2
3 I am back in England again, so glad to here among all my dear friends,
4but nothing ever makes me forget you & the other dear ones at Portlock.
5 I'll soon be well enough to write a long letter again
6
7 Olive
8
9 ^Address 30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace^
10

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/90
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Datend
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This postcard has no stamp, postmark or address and was presumably sent in an envelope that is no longer extant. There is a picture on its front of the Virgin Mary breastfeeding Jesus, with the caption: 'Solario. - La Vierge au Coussin Vert'.
1 Thank you so much for your letter dear. Tell mother I'll write soon
2
3 Love to you all.
4 Olive Schreiner
5
6 ^This is one of the great pictures in Paris^
7
8
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/91
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date15 February 1909
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner stayed in Matjesfontein from late December 1908 to late March 1909.
1 I sent you a little pamphlet which I thought might be useful to you.
2Please return it when you've read it, as I want to lend it to someone
3else. I think we ought to make Mr Murray President & Mrs Macfadyen
4deputy chairman
5
6 Olive
7
8 ^I shall move at the general meeting that all branches claim their own
9subscriptions.^
10
Notation
The 'little pamphlet', probably a Cape Women's Enfranchisement League one, is no longer attached and insufficient information exists for it to be traced.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/92
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date18 May 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at St Mary Abbotts Terrace for a number of periods in early and late 1914 and then in 1915.
1 Dear Friend,
2
3 I seem to have lost the power of writing. You are all so continually
4in my thoughts. I shall be going to Nauheim in a few weeks time. As
5the weather gets warmer my heart troubles me more. I have been up at
6Cambridge for the most of this week My little niece Ursula who is
7studying medicine there has had to undergo an operation for
8appendicitis. She is doing splendidly. My brother is still up there
9but leaves for Nauheim next week. I've so many many things I want to
10say. Perhaps when I get to Nauheim I'll feel more rested.
11
12 Love ^to you all
13 Olive^
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/93
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date21 October 1918
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 I had a letter from Mr Luscomb who seems to like his new quarters, but
2all our Cape folk will find the winter that is closing in about us
3hard to bear. The fog is terrible already. How I wish I could find
4myself on the farm with you all for a few days. I'm not well enough to
5write real letters, but I've got you all in my heart.
6
7 Olive
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/94
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLettercard
Letter Date22 January 1918
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address ToBroederstroom, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner lettercard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 Dear Friend
2
3 I was so glad to get your letter & Andres this evening. They did make
4me long to see you all in your beautiful home. I can well picture how
5charming Andre is now. If she only makes a wise choice when the time
6comes. But life sometimes seems to make the choice rather than the
7person themselves. I told Andre in my last that I had seen ?Wolner & A
8Wilson I liked them both.
9
10 Much love to you all
11 Olive
12

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/95
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date3 August 1914
Address FromAmsterdam
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front.
1 Amsterdam
2
3 I am here with my friend Dr Jacobs. I arrived from Berlin on Wednesday.
4 I meant to leave for England to-day, but the trains are so full of
5the military who mobilising, & the steamers so full of English &
6Americans who are flying from Germany that I might not get through so
7I am waiting till Monday when things might be better. It is a terrible
8time. The longer I live the more I hate war. It is an unmixed evil. I
9hope you have all had a lovely winter, & that war will not come near
10South Africa. I am beginning to long so to see the faces who live in
11Africa & the blue skys - but I know it would be foolish for me to go
12till I'm really better. Nauheim has certainly done me much good. I can
13walk much further than I could when I went there. I expect you are
14making the garden at the new place lovely. With so little frost
15anything will grow there. I'll write as soon as I get to England.
16
17 Love to you from
18 Olive
19
20
21

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/96
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date21 April 1914
Address FromCanterbury
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. There is a picture on the card of Canterbury Cathedral, with the caption ‘Cathedral, from Deanery, Canterbury’.
1 Dear Andre,
2
3 This is Canterbury Cathedral which I motored to yesterday with some
4friend. Its lovely. I am going back to London tomorrow Please write &
5give me your news.
6
7 Love to all
8 Olive Schreiner
9
10
11

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/97
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date12 June 1914
Address FromBad Nauheim, Germany
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Content indicates that the card was sent from Bad Nauheim, Germany. There is a picture on the postcard of a hotel at Bad Nauheim with the caption 'Hotel Augusta Victoria, Bad Nauheim'.
1 ^This is a lovely place buried in trees & beautiful woods. My brother
2Will is staying here too for treatment.^
3
4 OS
5
6 Thank you so much for your letter. I think Andre is making a wise
7choice. I'm so glad of all your news. I have been here a week & think
8the baths are doing me some good but can't say surely yet.
9
10 Much love to you all
11 Olive
12
13
14
Notation
Olive Schreiner has written the paragraph starting 'This is a lovely place' on the picture side of this postcard.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/98
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date23 December 1915
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. Schreiner was resident at St Mary Abbotts Terrace for a number of periods in early and late 1914 and then in 1915.
1 All my good wishes for you all for the coming year, dear Friend. Do,
2one of you write & give me all your news.
3
4 My love is with you all
5
6 Olive Schreiner
7

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/99
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date2 December 1915
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The recipient and the address this postcard was sent to are on its front. Schreiner was resident at St Mary Abbotts Terrace for a number of periods in early and late 1914 and then in 1915.
1 My loving Xmas greetings to you all. You are never forgotten by me.
2May it be a joyful day to you all.
3
4 Olive
5
6 London
7 Dec 2nd 1915
8
9 Tell the dear children their rug is such a comfort to me.
10

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/100
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date10 January 1914
Address FromFlorence, Italy
Address ToBroederstroom, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date is provided by the postmark on this postcard and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front. On it is a picture of Florence with the caption ‘Firenze – Panorama della Citta visto da S. Miniato al Monte’.
1 Thank you so much for your letter. This is a picture of Florence where
2I have been staying for two weeks. I am going to Mentone tomorrow via
3England.
4
5 Olive Schreiner
6
7
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/101
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date1 April 1914
Address FromFlorence, Italy
Address ToBroederstroom, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Who ToAndre Murray
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the recipient are on its front. There is a picture of Florence on the front, which depicts a street scene, the river and a bridge, with a caption 'Firenze - Lung'Arno Amerigo Vespucci col Ponte alla Carraia'.
1 Dear Andre
2
3 Write me please, a nice letter & tell you me how you all are, I have
4been ill since I came to Florence & am soon going back to England.
5Address c/o Dr Corthorn 30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace Kensington London.
6
7 My dear love to you all
8 Olive Schreiner
9
10
11
Notation
Beneath the caption to the picture on this postcard, Schreiner has written 'That is the bridge I cross over when I go to the other side'.

Letter Reference 87.17.4/1
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 January 1918
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToA publisher (T. Fisher Unwin)
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter was probably sent to T. Fisher Unwin, who had visited South Africa before Schreiner left it in December 1913.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgware Rd
3 W.
4
5 Jan 2nd 1918
6
7 Dear Sir
8
9 I have been trying every where to get a most valuable little book
10published by you, called "German Social Democracy during the war", by
11Bevan. They say they cannot get it for me. Could you possibly let me
12have a copy? I specially wish to give it to someone. I am sorry I did
13not meet you when you were in Africa, but there was a misunderstanding.
14
15 Yours faithfully
16 Olive Schreiner
17
18
19
20
21
22
Notation
The book referred to is: Edwyn Robert Bevan (1918) German Social Democracy During the War London: Allan & Unwin.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner 88.7.3
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 April 1917
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been torn and only these two short fragments remain.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgware Rd=
3 W.
4
5 April 2nd 1917
6
7 My Pal, I have your letter at last. I am now in my new rooms, much
8[papertorn]
9
10 We have had the heaviest fall of snow to-day we have had all this
11month, it lay in the streets 4 inches thick. The heaviest fall
12[papertorn] to [papertorn]
13
14
15
Notation
The end of this letter has been torn away, and just this fragment remains.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD 30/33/g
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 November 1906
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter by an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident in Matjesfontein from mid October to late December 1906. The start of the letter is missing.
1 [page/s missing] interested in the abnormal - not the exceptional, but
2diseased. His works ought to be called "the pathology of sex". It is
3not a study of sex in its healthy, common life giving manifestations,
4but of the diseases & perversions to which sex is, like all all other
5parts of our nature, liable.
6
7 I wrote to Ellis some time ago suggesting he should write a book or
8one or two books on sex in its normal, beautiful manifestations. Show
9for instance the wonderful effect of sex love in stimulating & raising
10the intellectual faculties, as in the case of the Brownings who pboth
11produced nearly all their best & greatest work during their intensely
12happy married life, & Mills case & a great many others. Also to
13showrite on the strange & beautiful blending of maternal feeling with
14sexual love - in almost all normal women when they have been married
15to a man a few years. (Ellis quotes a little bit of a letter of mine
16on this subject in this book) There are numbers of like subjects
17connected with sex of immense interest. But Ellis would have none of
18it. These things he said didn't interest him, they were not what he
19was trying to get at!! To me study of sex in its higher manifestations,
20 where it becomes in men & women the stimulus to noblest self
21sacrifice & the highest intellectual activity, is far more interesting
22than the fact that a certain unhappy abnormal man is only in love with
23the digestive organs of dogs! But with Ellis it is just the other way.
24To a certain extent Ellis is a true decadent; that is why he has a
25sympathy with Oscar Wildes writings & Symonds &c which I never can
26have.
27
28 ^NB Perhaps Burger would take a share in the paper? If he was
29interested in it he would help to get it taken in the Hanover district.^
30
31 Don't you think dear one, you might perhaps ?while the workmen are
32about have another coat of whitewash put on the roof. It must be
33wearing rather thin as it was not put on the right way (standing in a
34wooden cask for some time & being continually stirred). I which I I
35wish knew exactly the right proportions of salt & quicklime.
36
37 I enclose 1/- in stamps. Please buy Old Party some eggs. I fancy they
38are rather dear now, & feed her up on them. She's getting old dear, &
39needs extra feeding up to keep up her strength. I fancy I see her
40eating the raw eggs!
41
42 Your Bratje
43
44
45
Notation
Enclosed with this letter is a sheet of paper on which, in Cronwright-Schreiner's writing, is a now missing part of Schreiner's letter: '(you are profoundly right). There is Ellis's character, with all its beauty, truth, nobility and many wonderfully many-sided intellectuality, a strong element of abnormality. I felt it from the first day I met him; he never denied it; & we have often discussed it. He is only interested [ends]'.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD 30/33/i(ii)
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 12 November 1914
Address FromDurrants Hotel, Manchester Square, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 342
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in unknown hand. The final insertion is on a fragment of paper. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Durrants Hotel
2Manchester Square, W.
3
4 Wednesday Monday
5
6 My Pal,
7
8 Terrible raining, dark weather. Wet fog for five days; gas having to
9^be^ lighted all day to read or write by. I've tried three place in the
10last week. I am trying this. London is so crowded with Belgians &
11others that the poorest rooms are expensive & the res food bad & all
12things difficult. I couldn't stay any more at Alice's, she was
13impossible.
14
15 Thursday. My Cron, I have your long letter. I got it two days ago.
16When I got your letter I read the first page & then I came to the
17sentence about Ollie, I knew what had happened. For two days, I
18carried it in my pocket till I finished reading it. It was beautiful
19that she went so, at the very feet she had always loved so. Oh, little
20Ollie! little Ollie! She had a happy life dear one, was never struck,
21never hardly spoken to - had no suffering but that ear.
22
23 Oh my poor Cron my poor Cron! The little companion you had fed from
24your hand & carried in your bosom for 12 years. I can't, I can't bear
25to think of your loneliness. It has always comforted me that you had
26her. Oh my little Ollie, my little Ollie! I knew I would never see her
27again. Thank you for writing me that beautiful letter. I value it &
28know what it cost you. Oh my husband unreadable
29
30 My darling husband you are so lonely now! That dear little spot under
31my window!
32
33^an hour or two after I fainted & they had to carry me upstairs, but
34I'm quite right now. I've got my feet in the earth. Pal Sunday^
35
36
37
Notation
This letter was written in response to a letter from Cronwright-Schreiner of 18 September 1914, in which he writes many pages about Ollie the dog’s last hours after a stroke, concerning her seizure, the rush to the vet and then burying her, including: '... I have got up early that I may write about our little Ollie... even these few lines have made my heart beat & suffused my eyes with tears. For she has gone; in a second she fell dead, in the full tide of her life, painlessly. I must not refer to it again for a long time. I cannot stand it. But you will want to know and I feel I must tell you. You will like to know all that happened, and you will perhaps understand how little I can say of what it means to me...' Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) version of the letter is incorrect in a range of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD 30/33/k
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date9 December 1920
Address FromOak Hall, Wynburg, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner stayed with her niece Ursula Scott, her sister-in-law Fan Schreiner, and her friend Lucy Molteno, in Cape Town after her arrival from Britain on 30 August 1920, moving to a boarding-house in Wynberg in late October, where she was resident until her death on 11 December 1920.
1 Dec 9th 1920
2
3 My Pal,
4
5 I hope you have been able to get out of the London fog soon. They are
6choaking. I shall love to think of you in Rome. If you go through
7Basle & stop any time there, I sometimes had to stop 4 hours, you
8might like to go to the University to see my father's picture there. I
9wish you could go to Stutgard & go to Felbach a little village about 4
10miles out & see my fathers birth place the little house in which he
11was born was exactly as it was when he was a baby when I was there.
12
13 [missing page/s] bed with rheumatism. She is lucky to have a place
14where she can be ill in!! I am trying to go & see her.
15
16 Willie Cronwrights wife went up to Aliwal, because she could not sleep
17after her daughters death, but she got very very ill there with her
18heart & could not leave her bed. Its too high for her heart. She had
19to come down here on account of her heart. Ursie & Fan I never see.
20You see I can't walk & they've no time to come & see me. The only
21person
22
23 [missing page/s] country seems strongly stirred about the elections.
24Sir David Graaff & his fellow capitalists are behind Jannie. Money
25will flow like water. It is going to be a pure capitalists movement. I
26believe many of the old SA Party will now join the Nationalists. I'll
27add more if there's any news. Margaretha Purcell is still very ill &
28Joey is still in the hospital. There is no hope for her Anna tells me,
29it is cancer, but they are keeping this from
30
31 I long so to see the stars & the veldt: one day I will go up to
32Matjiesfontein just for one day, if I can find anyone to take me. It
33doesn't seem to me this is Africa.
34
35 A Happy New Year my dear one
36 Rensie
37
38
39
Notation
The page on which this letter is written is torn off following the paragraph beginning 'I hope you have been able?', and what follows on the reverse has been crossed through in Cronwright-Schreiner's hand. The paragraph beginning 'country seems strongly stirred' is on a separate sheet of paper and has also been crossed through by him, while on the reverse is the paragraph beginning 'I long so to see the stars', which he has not crossed through. This is one of the very last letters that Olive Schreiner wrote; she died in the early hours of 11 December 1920.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD 30/34/b(ii)
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 May 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1Sunday night
2
3 Dear Pal,
4
5 I would like to go to England. Don't think that treatment can cure me,
6but it might mend me enough to do a little work. I only want to be in
7this country to be near you, & I can hardly face such another summer
8as I spent last year in Cape Town.
9
10 If you had asked me to I would not go in same steamer with you,
11because I should be so afraid of being ill & spoiling your much needed
12holiday. And in Europe I should leave in December to escape the hot
13weather here, either the beginning or end of December, ^it depends on
14getting the Edinburgh Castle or some other steamer with good
15deck-cabin as otherwise I know I should not live through the voyage.^ I
16should spend a few days in London to see Adela & the Doctors & then go
17for the winter to some cheap little place on the Riviera for the
18winter, or to Florence to be treated by Miss Hobhouses Dr. as p
19
20 I would not have money enough to travel about & sight see &c. In
21spring I should try the Nauheim treatment for 6 weeks & then perhaps
22go back to England a little in the summer. I should not be your way
23any where dear one. Perhaps we might arrange to meet somewhere & have
24a few days little honey-moon together say at Munich or Stutgard & I
25could show you the little village where my father was unreadable born.
26I shall long to see my dear old Pal. You do need rest & perfect change
27dear & I hope you'll get much joy from it all & good.
28
29 If you pay my return ticket I shall find some way of paying the rest.
30
31 Your little Bratje
32 Olive
33
34 It would be fine if I got so much better that my brain would work eh?
35
36
37
Notation
The date and place has been written on this letter in Cronwright-Schreiner?s hand. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time. The letter was written in response to one Schreiner had received from Cronwright-Schreiner (SMD 30 34 ii), dated 19 May 1913, as follows:

^My letter to Olive. SCCS^

De Aar, 19th May 1913.

Dear Wife,

When you were in Cape Town I wrote that I must take several months? holiday at the end of this year, the reason being that, unless I had some complete change, I might break down. As I do not want any possibility of misunderstanding, I add in writing what I wish to say further in the matter. Firstly, I do not know that I can afford it and I would not dream of incurring the outlay if I did not feel sure that, unless I have some break, I shall not be able to continue indefinitely. And it occurred to me to go right away where it would be impossible to have any business matters referred to me or even to know what was transpiring in the office. If I do go, I shall go alone. But I am not at all sure that I shall go anywhere. It is not only the direct outlay that is important; what is lost, and perhaps some of it permanently, by my absence, and the risks run, is perhaps (almost certainly is) much greater. I feel too that we are both getting on in years, that your funds are low, that I shall soon have to defray all expenses (which I am ready to do when the time comes) and that you are unlikely, on account of your uncertain health, to earn much, if anything beyond a few pounds, in the future. So I feel I must be careful about spending, for, if what I say is correct and I should break down, we?ll be stranded. I have thought very gravely about my contemplated trip, and I am not at all sure that I shall even attempt to make it; if I do decide to try to make it possible, even then my going would depend upon my getting a good man to act during my absence, and even if I got such a man, I could not leave unless an experienced bookkeeper who knows all the business were in the office all the time. (I refer to Mrs Honey and I have no reason to think she contemplates leaving; but, if she were to, it would probably knock all idea of the trip on the head.) At the same time, feeling that you have no funds yourself and that it would smack somewhat of selfishness perhaps if I spent too much on myself, I wish to say that, if you would like to make the trip to England, I will pay your return ticket. I know you would like to see your friends and perhaps the trip would do you good. You may never have another opportunity; as your heart gets worse the sea journey may be dangerous for you. On the other had, perhaps expert treatment and the change now may do you good. If you wish to go, you may like to go now to catch the summer there, in which case no time should be lost. If not, I take it (if you wish to go) it will be about this time next year (assuming that my finances are then all right) or a little earlier. As I have said, if I go, I will go alone; I want complete rest and no one to think of at all, complete freedom of action. I should probably go to catch part of the winter there. Think it over. Please remember that my means will not permit of more than pay for the return ticket. You lead a terribly lonely life most of the year and it is not good for you. I wish I were wealthier. I work hard enough, but the return is not proportionate to the work in a business of small things such as mine is bound to be in a little up-country dorp. I should like you to see your friends again; I am sure it would do you good.

Yours husband,
Cron.

This letter is a typescript. There are two other drafts of it (SMD30 34 a and SMD 30 34 a (ii), and there is an accompanying envelope (SMD 30 34 a) which has written on it, in Cronwright-Schreiner's hand:

Strictly
Private & Personal
To
M.C. Cronwright

1. My letter to Olive, De Aar 19 May 1913, about trip to England.
2. Her reply 24 May 1913
3. Her second letter, 2nd July 1913, with footnote by myself (originals & copies)
-----
(a) My letter to Morthland, 5 & 21
(b) Carbon & written copies of my letter re I.P. to Olive, 2 Ap 1920
(c) Olive's reply, 11th May 1920
S.C.C.S.
2.11.22.


Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD/30/34/c
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 July 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on as 'before 2 July' in an unknown hand. Part of the envelope has been torn away, so while the year on the date stamp is visible, the rest of the date is not. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 My dear Pal
2
3 You have so many letters to read I'll be as short as I can, darling. A
4year & a half ago when Emily Hobhouse wanted to collect the money for
5me to go to England & try the cures, I told her I couldn't go. Some
6how I felt I couldn't leave Africa with you in it & know that for six
7months or a year however ill you were or whatever happened I couldn't
8get to you or see you. But when you said you were going I felt the
9only tie with Africa was broken. I don't want to be with; how could I
10in my present condition only needing doctors & nurses travel about
11sight seeing! If you wanted me to, I couldn't. I just want to go
12quietly & try cure after cure, & if I get better settle down at the
13Riviera & do a little writing. But if you were not in Engl Europe when
14I left or were not soon coming I couldn't go. If you will pay al my
15passage money I'll take all I have for the doctors & I know Will help
16me if I run short. Oh please dear let us plan to go. I want to do the
17voyage alone, I don't want to trouble any of my friends. I might ask
18Miss Molteno & Miss Greene to come with me but just because I'm so ill
19I can't. I can't bear to trouble any one. Don't you see that's the
20burden my beloved that I don't want to trouble any one.
21
22 Dear I wrote as far as this some time ago, & then I thought it was no
23use my going on as I would never go to England under any conditions.
24Now I feel a little better I think I'll give it you any how. Dear one
25do go: try & get a man to look after your business. Can't you get that
26young de Villiers? Think how beautiful it would be to me if I were
27being treated in Florence or Nauheim to know you were travelling about
28& seeing things, & not staying in this hole in De Aar. What made it so
29hard in that last long terrible summer in Cape Town, was the thinking
30of you alone up here. You do need rest & change, change most of all.
31If happened to be in London at any time when you were I should be at
32Alice Corthorn's undergoing treatment, & I suppose you would be at Dr
33Philpot's
. I would be willing to meet Mrs Philpot if she called on me
34because she is unreadable your friend; that would be necessary. She
35could not feel me insincere, because she knows well that I know her, &
36what I think of her though I have never told her. I should be quite
37polite to her, & that would be all. Dear noble old Philpot I should
38always be glad to see.
39
40 Oh dear love do this thing for your Olive, & promise her you will try
41to go just before I go or just after. I couldn't leave Africa & feel
42we should never be in the same continent again. It would break me down
43at once. It will not cost me so very much while I am with Alice.
44Please dear do what I ask. You suggested going: darling husband try &
45carry it out.
46
47 Your Brakje
48
49
Notation
The date has been written on this letter as 'received 2.7.13' in Cronwright-Schreiner's hand. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time. The letter also has a footnote added to it by Cronwright-Schreiner, as follows:

To this I replied (a) that I was not going to stay with the Philpots & had never meant to (b) that her attitude to Mrs P. was an insult & that I hoped she'd not call, (c) that she had no more right to resent my friendship with Mrs P. or think ill of it than I had with regard to her friendships with Ellis, Muirhead & other men, (d) that if she wrote to me thus again about Mrs P. or any other woman, the result would be disastrous.

S.C.C.S.

OS has written 'Private', underlined twice, on the accompanying envelope to SCCS, addressed to

Cronwright Schreiner Esq
Box 24
De Aar



Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner SMD/30/34/e
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 11 May 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToS.C. ('Cron') Cronwright-Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa. The start of the letter is missing. The bottom half of the final sheet has been cut away, following the paragraph ending 'she has nothing to do.', with 'on earth' on the reverse of the letter, and Schreiner signing off along the margin.
1[page/s missing]
2
33
4
5 or as long as you want it you are sure of that small room, & lots of
6room to store your luggage but it would be too small to keep on in You
7don't know how difficult it is to get quarters now. I can't take rooms
8now as you might not be able to sail. But I must find out when the
9Saxon is expected & if necessary take your rooms a couple of days
10before you land rather than lose them.
11
12Tuesday evening
13
14 My own pal, there is something I want to say to you. I am very ill & I
15want to say it before I die. I couldn't die without having said it.
16
17 I have never thought that you loved Mrs Philpot or that she loved you.
18The things that made me feel it hard to meet her were not anything she
19had done - it was the things she said about me. Her kindness to you &
20her friendship for you have been the one thing that has drawn me to
21her. The first thing Sir Bryan Donkin said about her before he
22introduced me to her & Dr Philpot was that I must be careful with her:
23that she had caused a great deal of sorrow & pain by her talking. & I
24have always careful never to say anything to her she could repeat. I
25think some people cannot help dis-cussing other people's affairs. &
26they don't realize that you can stab another human life deeper by
27words, than by any steel weapon. Perhaps I have minded things too much
28- now as the end comes I only want to feel kindly to every one &
29remember what was good & beautiful in them - let all the rest go. If
30there were only one woman in the world & that woman Mrs Philpot I
31should never have dreamed you were in love with her. I have never
32thought she was a passionate or by any possibility an immoral woman,
33but what she can't help doing is dis-cussing other people & their
34affairs with which she has nothing to do.
35
36 [bottom half of page torn off]
37
38on earth may not understand. Can you understand, dear one.
39
40 I hope so much I will be better when you come. I am such a miserable
41old wreck I don't want to make you sad
42
43[bottom half of page torn off]
44
45 ^Own Pal Your Olive.^
46
47
48
49
Notation
This letter is a response to one from Cronwright-Schreiner, a copy of which, made by him, is also been archived in the NELM collections (SMD30 34 d (ii)) as follows:

Copy of a letter from Cape Town to Olive, dated 2nd April 1920. (Carbon to M. 5.1.21)

I had decided to write to you on one or two matters and meant to do so this week or next, but I am, in a way, glad my departure has been delayed somewhat, as that will give you time to answer this if you wish to.

I propose to take a modest room somewhere in London, at which I shall sleep & perhaps breakfast, after which I shall join you for the day. I shall take my other meals wherever I happen to find myself. This is what is in my mind, but I shall have to see how it works.

Before I left De Aar for Johannesburg I re-read the correspondence between us before you left for England. (I have your original letters and copies of mine to you.). I again grew so angry that I almost decided to cancel my trip to England, but although I was then on the point of breaking down by reason of my prolonged, unceasing & monotonous work and almost complete solitude, and although I was nearly as enraged as I had been when I received them your preposterous letter about Mrs Philpot, I refrained from so deciding, because I should not have altered a decision so come to, although it might have meant our severance for ever, & because I love & revere you and desire, as far as I can, to aid you. You may remember I then wrote that, if you ever sent me such a letter again about Mrs Philpot or any other woman, the result would be disastrous. I meant it then & I mean it now, and I wish to add that the result will be equally disastrous whether you so address me again whether in writing or verbally. Long ago, after I found that in all things, it was quite useless to try to explain ^put you right about myself,^ I told you I would never again explain or excuse or justify myself, no matter what you thought about me. As you know, I have not swerved from that decision, & I shall not do so. I am quite determined to suffer no more persecution at your hands, especially about women. You do not base your attitude reasonably on facts; you build up something fantastic from your inner consciousness, which may & often has no relationship whatever to essential facts; this then becomes real to you. Mrs Philpot is only one & perhaps the most innocent (if there be degrees of innocence) of the women about whom you have persecuted me. You may attack me once more; if so, I shall not 'explain' & I have never retaliated), but it will never occur again. I write this now, because I shall of course see the Philpots in London & possibly stay a few days with them, & because you may suddenly & unreasonably get some absurd obsession about some other woman whom I have never even met. But I warn you particularly about Mrs Philpot. I have told her (I did so long ago) that you had written me a letter about her & that, in my opinion, she should in consequence refuse to meet you, I have of course not shown her the mad letter nor given her details, but I should do her an injustice if I did not mention you had written me a letter of such a nature that, if she knew its contents, she would refuse to meet you. If you don't wish me to come over, please say so at once.

Cron

This draft letter is in SCCS's handwriting, and is a later version of another draft (archived as SMD 30 34 d (i)). Written on the back of its second sheet in ink is 'Very private (copy) To Olive 2nd April 1920'. Added in pencil and also on the back is 'Dear M., of course for you to read & Keep. I think you have it already, but am making sure. S.C.C.S.' On the back of the first sheet has been added in pencil 'I stayed with Olive during the time we were together in England (that is from my arrival till she sailed) at 9 Porchester Place, W.2. S.C.C.S.' The later draft in SMD 30 34 d (i) differs in a number of small ways from this version. Schreiner's letter to SCCS of 11 May 1920 is a response. Cronwright-Schreiner made the various drafts as part of a set of information he sent to his brother Morthland, a lawyer, on which he commented to him as follows (SMD 30 34 f):

^Registered^
(usual address)
London, 5.1.21
M.C. Cronwright, Esq.
P.O. Box 4615 Johannesburg, S. Africa

My dear Morthland,

I find I can post up to tomorrow evening. I am therefore sending you with this a carbon copy (made at the time (Cape Town, 2nd April 1920)) of a letter I wrote to Olive on that date - at least, of a portion of such letter, beginning p.3; the other two pages had no reference whatever to the matter, or to any other matter of importance, and were not copied. I am now making another copy to keep for myself. Please put this letter (the one I am now writing to you) & my letter to Olive (which I am enclosing) among my papers.

A little time after Olive received this letter she wrote to me a note which I received in Cape Town (Rosebank) & have there yet. (I don't think I brought it over but have no time to search now.). The purport of her letter was to this effect - She did not think she'd live long & she did not want to leave me under a wrong impression as to what she meant. She said that she did not mean there was anything between Mrs Philpot & myself; she had never thought Mrs Philpot had lovers or had been unfaithful to her husband. Mrs Philpot, she said, had talked about her, has 'said something' about her.

That was all. She did not say what she believed ^heard Mrs Philpot has said about her. I did not see much of the Philpots while Olive was here; I refrained from doing so. The first time I went to afternoon tea I told Olive I was going, when she said quite pleasantly 'If they ask you to dinner, stay & have a good meal.' I said I had no intention to going to dinner. The last 10 days or more I did not even see the Philpots, &, for the rest, I hardly ever met them or ever and was rarely at their house. I and ^did not have any meals there. I^ made no secret of any movements - why should I? Olive was very nice about it all & I was quite natural of course. ---- I have been at some pains to find out what it was that so hurt Olive. (I think her letter is open to another construction, but I may be wrong: it was written obviously under great stress, & Olive should not be taken quite literally, speaking or writing, when in that state. Alas, alas!) From what I can gather, Albert Cartwright, a silly fool who once edited the S. Africa News, told a Mrs Unwin here that Olive was an impossible woman & that neither I nor anyone else (I think he said) could live with her. Mrs Unwin repeated this cruel thing = to Mrs Philpot among others; but Mrs Philpot, who has an immense opinion of Olive & to whom, she says, Olive was for many years an inspiration, assures me solemnly that she never repeated it. I do not know what Olive had to go on & I express no opinion on Mrs Philpot's assertion, nor do I know who carried so cruel a thing back to Olive.

SC Cronwright-Schreiner



Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Rebecca Schreiner 97.12.3.6.22
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date10 June 1874
Address FromColesberg, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToRebecca Schreiner nee Lyndall
Other VersionsRive 1987: 13
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. There is a page or pages missing from the end of this letter.
1 Colesburg
2 June 10th 1874
3
4 My dearest old Moth!
5
6 Last post brought me your letter & I don't like you to go with out a
7word in answer so I'll just try & write a word or two before school
8time You must not think of sending the 5/- I shall be very angry if
9you do. I inclose 3/- for Mrs Read Elizabeth has not yet sent the
10stamps up but I suppose she will do so soon.
11
12 I think you will like to have some idea of the way in which I spend my
13days here & it will be very easy to give it you as one day passes
14exactly like another. I get up pretty early, & always find many little
15things in the house to be seen after till breakfast time. As soon as
16that meal is over, & it like all the others is a very hurried one, I
17go into school & we don't come out till one, which is the dinner hour.
18When dinner is over I dress at once & go down with Mr Weakley to the
19shop where I stay till sunset. This is the hard part of my days work &
20I like it less & less every day. By the time we get up to the house
21supper is generally on the table & that being over & the little ones
22put to bed Mrs W & I get to do needle work which we keep on at till
23half past ten. We have no unreadable so here is a great deal to do but
24I manage to get through some in the morning school. Mrs W is generally
25down at the shop all the morning, but as we have two servants I have
26not much to do except see that they keep to their work. Miss Read
27called on me the other day & I like both her & her mother. Mrs ?Scales
28& her daughter send much love to you. I have not seen much of them nor
29of any one else here, as I have no time for going out & I am not sorry
30that I have not.
31
32 I hope dearest Moth that you will not have a great deal of trouble
33about the new house [page/s missing]
34
35
36
Notation
Rive's (1987) version of this letter has been misdated, omits part of the letter, and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Margaret McNaughton 97.12.3.6.23
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 September 1878
Address FromGanna Hoek, near Cradock, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToMargaret McNaughton
Other VersionsRive 1987: 18
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. There is a page or pages missing from this letter and it is unclear whether it was ever sent.
1 Ganna Hoek
2 Sep 24th 1878
3
4 My dear Miss McNaughton!
5
6 After having six months to pass I feel more than half ashamed to
7fulfil my promise of writing to you; but in truth I should have done
8so long ago had I not waited, hoping I should be able to send a
9likeness when I did write.
10
11 I saw so very little of you in Colesburg but I never met with any one
12whom I so much wished to know more of, & if it had been possible for
13me to see you oftener, my life in that most miserable of all the stony
14holes on the face of the earth would have had at least a few pleasant
15memories connected with it.
16
17 I make no doubt that by this time you have left it, so address my
18letter to Cape Town where I hope it will find you, though I am not
19sure if I spell your name rightly.
20
21 You will see from the date of my letter than that I am now at Ganna
22Hoek - a farm buried away among the mountains ^&^ about forty miles
23distant from Cradock. I have been here ever since I left Colesburg &
24shall certainly remain for the next six months, & perhaps for
25unreadable as many years. It is as quiet & out of the way corner of
26the world as you can well imagine. An English face one never sees &
27when now & then an old boer puts in an appearance it is quite a
28momentous event in our little world.
29
30 The family consists of the Dutch man & his wife & their three or four
31children - my pupils - & as they never go into Cradock you may fancy
32how very quiet & monotonous the life we lead here is. But 'tis a life
33that I can & do thoroughly enjoy & the six months I have past here
34have been the most uninterruptedly happy of my whole life. I feel, & I
35am sure must look, like another human being & a very different one
36from the miserable misanthropic life sick old creature as I was when I
37left that most unblessed of spots.
38
39 This is a wild beautiful place. The farm house is perched high up, on
40the side of one of the mountains & the bush which comes down to the
41very garden is as unman defiled as one could wish & wild as one can
42wish ^&^ I have only to teach for five or six hours a day & all the rest
43of my time I can spend out of doors, or in my own little room studying.
44 I have plenty of books & if in one way I don't make as much head as I
45should do is I had ass [page/s missing]
46
47
48
Notation
Rive's (1987) version of this letter has been misdated, omits part of the letter, and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner-Extra SMD 30/33/b
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFebruary 1890
Address FromMount Vernon, Gardens, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToErilda Cawood nee Buckley
Other VersionsRive 1987: 166 fn5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date and the name of the addressee have been written on this letter in Cronwright-Schreiner's hand.
1 Mount Vernon
2 Cape Town
3
4 Darling,
5
6 You must not wait for my visit. All I can say is that if at all
7possible
before I leave South Africa I shall come to see you. I am
8leaving for Matjesfontein next month. I shall stay there for some
9time writing. My great plan in coming to this country is to go up to
10Matabele & Mashona Land, &, it may be possible visiting the Zyambesi
11falls. But that will not be till my books are done, perhaps next
12August. I shall be able to start. I shall visit Johannesburg before I
13go, & shall I hope see Ossey there.
14
15 I am slowly working out my plan, getting letters of introduction to
16people up there &c. Will Cron Wright be up in Matabele Land then.
17
18 This is just one word to tell you not to wait for me.
19
20 Your unforgetting little friend
21 Olive
22
23 Cecil Rhodes must be a splendid man, the one man of genius we have in
24this Colony
25
26
27
Notation
All of this letter has been crossed through in blue pencil by Cronwright-Schreiner. Rive (1987) refers to the letter in a footnote only, quoting one sentence from it. Some months after it was written, Cron Cronwright wrote to Olive Schreiner (SMD30 33 (c)); she sent his letter, with her inserted comments, to Erilda Cawood, as below:

^I think this man has had a struggle to keep from being commonplace & vapid - but he has succeeded - is he a journalist?^
^Thankyou^

^Don't lose my previous letter. I found it today when I most needed help.^


Krantz Plaats
Cradock
29th Aug '90

Dear Miss Schreiner

I hoped to have had the pleasure of meeting you at Ganna Hock on the 27th, as Mrs Cawood told me she had asked you to pay her a visit. I should have liked personally to have thanked you for the honour you have done the Colony by writing 'The Story of an African Farm', & to have expressed my appreciation of the intellect which has produced such a work - a work which, as far as my know-ledge goes, displays the greatest talent of anything which S. Africa has yet given to the world of literature - our most valuable treasure.

It has only been my good fortune lately to read the book, but it strikes a chord in my heart that very few can. Perhaps it is because, before I read it, I had struggled towards the light, and in my effort to get at the truth, had thrown off the superstition of religion, and, as you know, to one brought up as most of us are, & really believing, this is not done lightly, or without, at first, much pain - I can hardly say without much effort, for, to my mind, certain premises lead inevitably to certain conclusions, even when they run counter to my wishes. The effort is in overcoming early prepossessions. But it is unnecessary for me to explain myself to you. I am like Waldo listening to the sweet voice of the stranger.

It is not for me here to criticise the book, but it is a book which, like Warren Hasting's character, will bear many blemishes. Now, I only wish to express my admiration for the boldness displayed in dealing with such subjects, & the ability & charm with which they are handled. Many a less exact thinker, & less courageous mind has, no doubt been greatly helped. by the work; and it is a great treat to all who can appreciate the divine gift of original thought, & the power of expressing ennobling sentiments with 'the pen of a ready writer'.

May I ask you what else you have written, & where it is to be found; also what magazines you write to or intend writing to?

I need not ask you to advise me as to when any book you write may appear, it will be heard of in more remote parts than a corner of the 'parched Karoo'.

I trust I am not troubling you too much, & I hope you will pardon my having addressed you, & at such length. In explanation I can only /say that you have no more appreciative admirer than myself.

If, when writing to Mrs Cawood, you would supply the information asked above, I could get it from her, & would esteem it as a great favour.

I am
Yours respectfully
S.C.Cronwright

Miss Olive Schreiner


Schreiner has also written an insertion on the attached envelope, as follows:

Local

^Cron's first^

SC Cronwright-Schreiner
Box 2 Johannesburg

^letter to me^




Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner-Extra SMD 30/33/a (i)
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date9 November 1888
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The date has been written on this letter by an unknown hand. The start of the letter is missing. The name of the recipient is indicated by content.
1 Mrs Cobb has send me a beautiful likeness of her little girl whom she
2has called after me. Fancy it comforts me so. Shall I send it you to
3look at? Oh, won't it be nice to die, Harrie?
4
5Give my love to that dear brave old Louie
6
7 Olive
8
9 I'm all right, but so very weak, I sometimes find I'm sittng on the
10floor crying but I haven't any idea what it's about or why I am crying.
11 I seem to be always crying inside
12
13

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Will Schreiner 97.12.3.6.24
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 October 1875
Address FromGanna Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToWilliam Philip ('Will', 'WP') Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 18-19
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Ganna Hoek
2 Oct 20th 1875
3
4 My dear old Will!
5
6 The Fouches are going into Cradock to have their baby baptised & I
7must take advantage of my chance & send you in a few lines.
8
9 Many thanks for your letter. I suppose you are now in your new
10quarters which I hope you find comfortable & to your taste. What sort
11of persons are the Doctor & his wife? Do you board with them? or have
12your meals alone, just as you would at another boarding house? What
13part of the Town are you in?
14
15 Alice & Robert must now be in Town. Do you see much of them? Is not
16Winnie a little beauty? Give my love to A - & tell her that the last
17letter I have from her is dated the 26th of July so I am beginning to
18despair of ever hearing from her again.
19
20 I hope I shall be able to go into Cradock soon. I have only been in
21once in the eighteen months I have been here & I want to have my photo
22taken for Mamsy. I will if they are at all at all good send you one.
23I am going to have a look for dear little Prue's grave too. I wish I
24could keep a dog here, but pets give you no end of misery - if you are
25staying in another's house so I must wait for that pleasure till the
26golden day comes when I live in a little room all by my-self & be free
27freer freest,
28
29 Of course you have read Ettie's speech. What do you think of it?
30People in Cradock think its very clever good & good & talk ever so
31much of it.
32
33 I have half an idea of joining the G.T.'s but hardly think it would be
34right I'm not in earnest enough about it, & its no use putting your
35hand to work unless your heart can guide it as well as your head. Are
36you joining? Are they strong in Cape Town? I should hardly think so.
37
38 Mrs Cawood sent me word the other evening that her children were ill
39so I went over & she & I sat up chatting all night & when I home
40started at sunrise & she came with me half way. She is such a dear
41noble unreadable woman, she is quite converting my woman hatred into
42woman love. A sex that can contain such women as she & Ettie cannot be
43quite an invention of the devil though I still think he must have been
44very active about the time she came into existence.
45
46 I'm desperately back achey this afternoon & mean to go & lie down all
47little now - One of the girls let a box fall on my back a week or so
48ago, & ever since if I try to sit too long it gets very bad.
49
50 Good bye my own old Bro. This is a scrappy scatter brain letter but
51you must answer it very quickly
52
53 Your loving old sissie
54 Olive
55
56
57
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Letters to Friends and Family 97.12.3.8.2
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Datend
Address Fromna
Address To
Who Tounknown
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This example of Schreiner's 'old style' commented on in the insertion was sent as part of a letter to an unknown recipient, most likely Havelock Ellis given its particular location in the NELM collections.
1Chapter
2The general agents wife
3Showing how Aunt Susanna gave sage advice
4
5 In those bright old days before ever the morning stars sang together,
6ere ever this progressive & slowly evolving world has been launched
7into space, it may well have been that Angels of Light des-cended at
8one blow from the white hills of Heaven to the dim vales of Hell; but,
9in this later eon laws & things have strangely changed, & with whether
10for well or woe, move on by inches.
11
12 The white robed saints slip over the crags that border the celestial
13mountains so softly that they dream themselves still walking on its
14summits. Wandering on its undulating sides, only those above them can
15mark their downward course, & they themselves wake only when the
16groans of the damned are about them. If Bertie ever realized there was
17an up above to which she would never ^climb.^
18
19^Of course its meant unreadableironically You would see if you read it
20all. I can’t realize I could have written like this.^
21
22^& all the agony of a mute ?nature to unreadable so not given to
23unreadable itself in words is unreadable than

24
25All its struggles its force unreadable was upon the word^
26
27^This is typical of you my old style. Don’t throw it away. I have a
28particular affection for this because Will said it was nice & made me
29proud. How long ago that seems.^
30
31
Notation
Bertie is a character in From Man to Man. The two insertions, 'Of course it's meant ironically' and 'This is typical of my old style' are in a visibly later handwriting from the 'old style' itself.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner-Extra 33 a (ii)
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: December 1888 ; Before End: March 1889
Address FromMentone, France
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1I am paying 36/- a week at this place. I am the only person in the
2hotel. I feel so loving to you. I like Mentone, its beautiful.
3
4Harry, I’ve done what I knew I would at last.