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Letter Reference HRC/ChristopherMorley/Misc/OS-FredericChapman/1
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 September 1886
Address FromThe Convent, Harrow, London
Address To
Who ToFrederic Chapman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is written on black-edged mourning paper.
1The Convent
2Harrow
3Sep 16 / 86.
4
5Dear Mr Chapman
6
7R. Pears-all Smith the American tells me he sent a letter to your care.
8 Could you kindly forward it to me, ^here.^ And would you kindly let me
9know how many copy^ies^ of my book you have still been unable to dispose of.
10
11Yours faithfully
12Olive Schreiner
13
Notation
The Schreiner book referred to is The Story of An African Farm.

Letter Reference HRC/ChristopherMorley/Misc/OS-FredericChapman/2
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 November 1886
Address From9 Blandford Square, Paddington, London
Address To
Who ToFrederic Chapman
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
19 Blandford Sq
2Nov 2 / 86
3
4Dear Mr Chapman
5
6Your letter has just been forwarded to me from the Convent. I hope to
7reply or call to see you in a couple of days.
8
9Yours sincerely
10Olive Schreiner

Letter Reference HRC/HavelockEllis/Misc/OS-HavelockEllisMisc/1
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateApril 1889
Address FromLondon
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated using information on a letter from Arthur Symons which it is written on the back of. Schreiner was in London immediately before moving to Knaphill in mid April 1889. Arthur Wing Pinero’s ‘Sweet Lavender’ was on at Terry’s Theatre in 1888.
1I am going down to
2Knap-Hill
3Nr Woking
4Surrey
5on Saturday Alice will be there on till Monday afternoon. Can you come
6on Monday morning, & help me decide about the house. I long to see you.
7 I am afraid that place is damp I’ve had such rheumatism since
8yesterday that right arm can hardly hold pen. You must come to
9Brookwood station & walk up to Knap-hill about 1 mile & a ½.
10
11My cousin Emile has written a nice letter.
12
13I’m very pl glad Symons liked being here. I thought I was so tired
14he would be bored. I’m always tired now. Are you in love that you
15suddenly look so handsome. If you would rather come when I am alone
16come on Tuesday & perhaps we can go Hind head for the day they say
17it’s lovely.
18
Notation
The letter from Arthur Symons that Schreiner's letter in on the back of is as follows:

‘10 Arundel Street
Strand, W.C.
April 25th

Dear Miss Schreiner

Is there any chance of seeing you again while I am up? I want, among other things, to tell you about “Sweet Lavender” which I saw at Terry’s last night, & about Pater & his exquisite little cat Nedly, whom I have been seeing to-day. I have Saturday after noon free: should I find you at home then, & not busy or engaged?

I should like to know what you think of the enclosed poem, by Mathilde Blind.

Will you send me just a line?

Very truly yours
Arthur Symons’

Mathilde Blind’s poems appeared in book form: Mathilde Blind (1889) The Ascent of Man: with other poems London: Chatto & Windus.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-i
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 February 1884
Address FromEdinburgh Hotel, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 12-13; Rive 1987: 35; Draznin 1992: 34-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
1Edinburgh Hotel
2St. Leonards-on-Sea
3Feb 25 / 84
4
5My dear Sir,
6
7On my return from a visit to London I found your letter which my
8publishers had forwarded here. Had I received it sooner I should have
9earlier written to tell you of the pleasure your expression of
10sympathy with the little book “An African Farm” gave me. Thank you
11for having written.
12
13The book was unreadable written on an Upcountry farm in the Karroo, &
14it gives me ^much^ pleasure to think that other hearts find it real. I
15have been now almost three years in England but I long always for that
16old life.
17
18I agree with you in objecting to Bonaparte: he is drawn closely after
19life, but in hard straight lines with-out shading^,^ & is not artistic^,^
20nor idealized enough. I had no definite idea when I wrote the story
21that I should ever come to England or publish it. It was just one of
22the many little stories I had been making ever since I was five years
23old, & its kind reception at the hands of the critics here surprised
24me much. & a letter such as yours I value much indeed.
25
26There is too much moralising in the story, but when one is leading an
27absolutely solitary life one is apt to use one’s work as Gregory
28used his letters, as an out-let for all one’s superfluous feelings^,^
29without asking too closely whether they can or can not be artistically
30expressed there.
31
32I intend bringing out another book towards the close of the year.
33
34Thank you again for your letter which has given me such pleasure
35
36I am, dear Sir,
37Yours sincerely
38Olive Schreiner
39
Notation
The 'another book' Schreiner refers to is From Man to Man. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version is in minor respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is also incorrect in minor ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-ii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 March 1884
Address FromEdinburgh Hotel, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 13; Draznin 1992: 36-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
1Edinburgh Hotel
2St. Leonards-on-Sea
3March 16 / 84.
4
5Dear Sir
6
7Thankyou very much for your letter. I shall so like to see that
8article when you are kind enough to send it me. I shall be be
9remaining at St. Leonards till the weather gets warmer.
10
11Yes, it would be impossible to return to the old life: the outward
12circumstances might be recalled, but the hope that made it beautiful
13would never come back when once the outside world had been known, &
14found empty.
15
16I have not read any of Hardy’s novels, but am sending for the
17“Westminster Rev:” to read your article. What you say in the
18letter about “the melodramatic & farcial element” is very true.
19When I said that Bonaparte was not “idealized” enough perhaps I
20was using the word in a sense of my own; what I meant was that he was
21painted roughly from the outside (just as I might off-hand des-cribe
22the people who sat at dinner with me this evening) not sympathetically
23from the inside showing the how & the why of his being the manner of
24sinner he was. I should have entered into him showed his many sides,
25not only the one superficial side that was ridiculous; then he would
26have been a real human creature to love or to hate, & not farcial at all.
27
28Is it very long since you left Australia? Do you not miss the
29starlight nights when one can be out all night, I miss them so. It is
30so hard to think shut up in a room.
31
32I am,
33Yours very sincerely,
34Olive Schreiner
35
36The “Miss” is right. I do not think I shall be leaving this till
37May when I return to town.
38
Notation
For Ellis's article on Hardy, see: Havelock Ellis (1883) 'Thomas Hardy's Novels' Westminster Review no.119, 1883: 334-64. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in major ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-iii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 March 1884
Address FromEdinburgh Hotel, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 14; Rive 1987: 35-6; Draznin 1992: 38-40
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
1Edinburgh Hotel
2March 28 / 84
3
4My dear Mr. Ellis,
5
6I have just finished reading your article in the Westminster, & I have
7read “A pair of blue eyes.” I think your criticism very adequate &
8just. I shall read “Far from the madding crowd” & then I shall
9better be able to make up my mind as to whether I like Hardy much or
10not. Now I hardly know – there seems to me a certain shallowness &
11un-real-ness about his work – no, that’s putting it too strongly;
12it seems to me as though he was only fingering his characters with his
13hands, not pressing them up against him till he felt their hearts beat.
14
15Thank you for your letter. I liked the last sheet about your
16Australian life. Yes, our African sky gives one the same sense of
17perfect freedom & wild exhilaration; sometimes one feels as though,
18for no reason that could be given, one were almost in an ecstasy of
19happiness when one goes out alone. Here one never is alone.
20
21The book that the Stranger gives to Waldo was intended to be
22Spencer’s “First Principles.” When I was up in Basuto Land with
23an old Aunt & cousin, one stormy, rainy night, there was a knock at
24the door; they were afraid to go & open it so I went. There was a
25stranger there like Waldos Stranger exactly. There was no house within
26fifty miles so he slept there: the next morning he talked with me for
27a little while & after that I saw him twice for half an hour: & then I
28never saw him again. He lent me Spencer’s “First Principles.” I
29always think that when Christianity burst on the dark Roman world it
30was ?about what that book was to me. I was in such complete, blank
31atheism. I did not even believe in my own nature, in any right or
32wrong, or certainty. I can still feel myself lying before the fire to
33read it. I had only three days. I always hoped I should see him again
34some day & tell him how he had an had helped me - Just after I had
35written that part of the story where he comes in I heard that he had
36killed himself. I am not sorry he did it if life was too sore for him;
37but I cannot bear to think of all he suffered before he did it; – &
38he helped me so. I always feel as though his grave was^ere^ one of my
39possessions.
40
41If you write any other articles for reviews & do not mind telling me
42^of them,^ I should be glad; it would interest me to read them very much.
43
44Have you read a little play called “Nora” by Ibsen, translated
45from the Swedish by my Frances Lord?? It is a most wonderful little
46work. I should like it to be reviewed by some able reviewer that it
47might be more widely read, but perhaps you would not like it. It shows
48some sides of woman’s nature that are not often spoken of, & that
49some people do not believe exist – but they do. I think
50
51Yours sincerely
52Olive Schreiner
53
54^It is very funny that in the book that I am revising now there is one
55character who reminds me somewhat of Knight in his relation to Elfride.
56 The likeness is not strong, still it is there. He is a man who when
57the woman he loves confesses to him turns away from her; but my woman
58tells him that which he could never have known if she had not told him^
59
60^& he yet turns away from her.^
61
Notation
Ellis's article is: Havelock Ellis (1883) 'Thomas Hardy's Novels' Westminster Review no.119, 1883: 334-64. The Stranger and Waldo appear in The Story of An African Farm. The character in 'the book I am now revising' is Bertie in From Man to Man. The Knight and Elfride reference is to Hardy's Pair of Blue Eyes. The books referred to are: Thomas Hardy (1877) A Pair of Blue Eyes London: Henry King; Thomas Hardy (1875) Far From the Madding Crowd London: Smith, Elder & Co; Herbert Spencer (1862) First Principles London: Williams & Norgate; Henrik Ibsen (1882) Nora (later A Doll’s House) (trans Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Giffith, Farran & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in major ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-iv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date8 April 1884
Address FromEdinburgh Hotel, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 14-15; Rive 1987: 36-7; Draznin 1992: 42-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
1Edinburgh Hotel
2April 8 / 84
3
4My dear Mr. Ellis
5
6It happens that the book I have been reading the last few days has
7been James Hinton’s “Life & Letters” I have loved the man
8him-self. I like to know that saying of his that you tell me of. In
9his feeling for woman he is like Jesus but like few other men. I have
10had a feeling while I have been reading the book that the writer,
11without meaning to be untrue is not quite showing the real man: your
12letter of this evening tells me that I was right. I look forward to
13seeing the book you talk of: will it be ready soon?
14
15Thank you for letting me see those sonnets. The first three express
16what has also been my experience; but sometimes I let the joy be
17overclouded by letting my own little personal life come in. Your
18sonnets & I think something in your letters help me. “Arabella” is
19a sweet little poem. & strikes one as being sincere. The last four
20lines I like better than the other ten. They are very strong.
21
22Thursday.
23
24I am not able to write very much at a time & could not finish my
25letter the other day. This morning I came across your Sonnet in
26“Today” “Sophia Perovskaia”. I am glad you feel sympathy with
27socialism.
28
29You ask me whether Spencer is to me what he was. If one has a broken
30leg & a doctor sets it; when once it is set one may be said to have no
31more need of the doctor, never the-less one always walks on his leg. I
32think that is how it is with ^regard to^ myself & Herbert Spencer. I
33have read all his works once, some three & four times, now I read him
34no more. He helped me to believe in a unity underlying all nature;
35that was a great thing, but he has nothing else to give me now.
36
37I have read Straus’s “Old Faith & New,” but that was lately. I
38suppose you have read his life of Jesus? It had a rather strange
39effect upon me; it made me love Jesus so much. I never cried over the
40crucifixion till I read Straus’s cold dispassionate criticism ^of^
41that poor loving human soul that had been so tender to other, left
42there to face death alone. I am glad those women went after him. I
43believe Mary Magdalene stood close to the cross where the blood of his
44feet dropped down on her.
45
46With regard to Nora. I think Ibsen does see the other side of the
47question, but in a book which is a work of art & not a mere
48philosophical dessertation it is not always possible to show all the
49sides. I have a sense of something wanting in the book, but I do not
50see how he could have supplied it. In the ideal condition for which we
51look men & women will walk close, hand in hand, but now the fight has
52often^est^ to be fought out alone by both. I think men suffer as much as
53women from the falseness of the relations. Helmer’s life lost as
54much as Nora’s did through the fact that they never lived really
55together.
56
57I have not got “Far from the madding crowd” yet; but I have been
58reading C. Brontë’s Villette. I think it splendid.
59
60Yours sincerely,
61Olive Schreiner
62
63We are having beautiful weather here. I went to Ecclesbourne Glen this
64afternoon & basked in the sun. Have you ever been there?
65
Notation
Ellis's sonnets were not published as a set until 1925, although some of them appeared contemporaneously in journals and magazines. 'Sophia Perovskaia' is in Ellis's Sonnets With Folk Songs. The books referred to are: Henrik Ibsen (1882) Nora (later A Doll’s House) (trans Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Giffith, Farran & Co; Thomas Hardy (1875) Far From the Madding Crowd London: Smith, Elder & Co; Havelock Ellis (1925) Sonnets With Folk Songs From the Spanish Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press; Ellice Hopkins (1878) Life and Letters of James Hinton London: Kegan Paul; David Strauss (1835-5) Life of Jesus (2 vols, trans George Eliot) London: Williams & Norgate; Ernest Renan (1864) Life of Jesus London: Trubner & Co; Charlotte Bronte (1853) Villette London: Smith, Elder & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in major ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-v
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date19 April 1884
Address FromEdinburgh Hotel, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 15-16; Rive 1987: 37-9; Draznin 1992: 44-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
1Edinburgh Hotel
2April 19 / 84.
3
4My dear Mr. Ellis
5
6That extract from Mr. Hinton’s letter I liked very much; though I
7could not quite understand it I could fill in. James Hinton’s life
8has been a help to me. Sometimes I get an almost despairing feeling,
9that woman will have to save woman alone, – & yet I feel that to be
10impossible
. Strength comes when I see one man’s heart that has seen
11these things, & burnt over them. He has chimed in with the thought &
12feelings that are just now dominant in my life. I shall like to read
13that article of yours upon him.
14
15The book I am revising now is the story of a woman, a simple,
16child-like woman, that goes down, down. I wish I wish I had more power;
17 I would put it all into this book; I would write so that no one who
18read it should ever forget it. You will find many artistic faults, but
19I think you will sympathize with it.
20
21Thank you for tellingl me about “Arabella” Your sonnet is much
22more beautiful to me now, much. When I first came to England I was
23nursing in a Hospital for a little time, & I had such a beautiful girl.
24 She was almost dying of inflammation of the lungs. A little thrill of
25pleasure used to run through me every time I had to touch her or do
26anything for her, & she used to open her sweet eyes, just like two
27stars, & look at me. I don’t know if I should have liked your sonnet
28quite so much but for that. That is the best of writing what is true;
29other lives are sure to answer back to it. I wonder if your girl
30looked like mine
31
32Strauss’s life of Jesus is very different from Renan’s, I think
33better; though I like I Renan. I shall be glad when his life of his
34sister is published. It will be the record of a true relation between
35a man & a woman
36
37I love Shelly, & there is another man whom I love in that same
38personal way, Hein¬rich Heine. I personify myself with him. I know
39how & why he wrote every line that he did write. There is more depth &
40passion in one of his sneers, more quivering ?reflecting ^tenderness^
41veiled under it, than in the out-cries of half the world. I feel that
42I owe a debt of personal gratitude to the girl who comforted him in
43his “Mattress grave”.
44
45I have not the same personal feeling for Hinton that you have, who
46know so much more of him than I can from that life; but one thing that
47draws me to him very much is his fear of feeling: that comes out so
48clearly in the extract you sent me. Some people dare not feel fully
49– all life must be a long self-repression.
50
51I have never seen that picture that you mention. I have always thought
52that she stood so. How else could she stand.
53
54If you know of any very good book will you please tell me of it. I got
55down ten last time, & of them all only Hinton’s life was a real book.
56 I want scientific reading^:^ my mind needs it just now.
57
58I like to write to you
59
60Yours sincerely,
61Olive Schreiner
62
63May I, please, copy your poem “Arabella” & send it to a friend of
64mine. She will like it so much.
65
Notation
'The book I am revising now' is From Man to Man. Ellis's 'Sophia Perovskaia' is in his Sonnets With Folk Songs. His sonnets were not published as a set until 1925, although some of them appeared contemporaneously in journals and magazines; see Havelock Ellis (1925) Sonnets With Folk Songs From the Spanish Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press. The books referred to are: David Strauss (1835-5) Life of Jesus (2 vols, trans George Eliot) London: Williams & Norgate; Ernest Renan (1864) Life of Jesus London: Trubner & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-vi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 May 1884
Address FromEdinburgh Hotel, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 17-19; Rive 1987: 39-41; Draznin 1992: 46-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
1Edinburgh Hotel
2Ap May 2nd 1884
3
4My dear Mr. Ellis
5
6Heine is not understood, & I almost doubt whether anything one could
7do would cause him to be better understood. He belongs to his own,
8like Emerson. One might cause him to be more read (& that would be
9something) but the real man, the infinitely tender, burning,
10passionate heart will be known only to a few – it must be heart to
11heart.
12
13I have been reading that little book you lent me all the afternoon. I
14like it, & I like it more the more I read it, & when I re-read a page
15or two I like it better than at first. It is true, & it expresses what
16is in our hearts, ours of today. I must get Whitman & read him. I have
17read nothing of his yet. One evening a friend began to read him aloud
18to me, but I was in a wicked mood & began to laugh: I made fun of ^him,^
19it, & made them all laugh so that there was no more reading. I have
20sent for him to-day.
21
22It was at the Royal Infirmary at Edinburgh that I nursed for a little
23while, & saw my beautiful girl. Then I was taken ill. When I got
24?fluen better I went to the Woman’s Hospital in Endel St in London, &
25nursed there for five days, & then I got inflammation of the lungs, ^&^
26had to go to Ventnor. When I came back I began attending the lectures
27at the Woman’s Medical School, the second lecture I went to I got my
28feet wet & sat in wet boots & got congestion of the lungs. I am very
29strong & well now, but I have made up my mind that scribbling will be
30my only work in life.
31
32Yes, my little glimps of nursing life was very sweet to me I am glad I
33had it though it was so short. The dream of my life always was to be a
34doctor; I can’t remember a time when I was so small that it was not
35there in my heart. I used to dissect ostriches, & sheeps’ hearts &
36livers, & almost the first book I ever bought myself was an elementary
37physiology. I don’t like to talk of my old dream even now, my heart is
38still tender over it. It seems to me that a doctor’s is the most
39perfect of all lives, it satisfies the craving to know, & also the
40craving to serve. A nurse’s life is sweet, but not so perfect.
41
42Thank you for those papers you sent me. I think I should like to join
43that society, though, like you, I have not much faith in them
44societies. One old woman sitting in her bed room alone reading her
45bible is sincere, but six old women at a “class meeting” make humbugs
46– very often. Ideally nothing can full be more perfect than the aims
47of that Progressive Society. I like the “New Life,” especially the
48clause on the necessity of combining physical with mental labour.
49
50My feeling about Socialism is exactly yours. I sympathize with it, but
51when I see the works & aims of the men who are working for it in
52London my heart sinks. What will it benefitt us to seize away the
53money from the rich? At the same moment that the greedy hands are
54seizing it there will pass over with it the disease of which the rich
55are dying, the selfishness, the hardness of heart, the greed for the
56material good. What we want is more love & more sympathy Does it ever
57strike you, it often does me, fo how within the sixteen miles that
58make London lie all the materials for heaven on earth, if only some
59thing could come suddenly & touch our hearts one night; there would be
60no-body sad, no-body lonely: every aching head with a hand on it;
61every miserable old maid let out of her drawingroom & her old life
62blood flowing; every wailing little child hushed in somebody’s arms &
63making them warm: no-body hungry & nobody untaught, the prisons
64emptied & the back slums cleaned, everybody looking with loving eyes
65at the world about them. That would be heaven, & it only wants a
66little change of heart. I haven’t faith in anything that promises to
67raise us by purely material means.
68
69I am glad you are so busy, you must be happy.
70
71Thank you for telling me about that new book of Romane’s. I think you
72are wrong in saying that scientific reading is not of much use. It is.
73To touch & handle would be far better, but it is better than nothing.
74You don’t know what a gap would be left in my life if all the ^good^
75?tragaghumites I have had from scientific books were taken out of it
76(making the word scientific cover everything from Darwin & Carl Vogt,
77to little primers on Heat & Light). I think that even the mere reading
78helps one to the feeling that truth is before all things, & to have a
79kind of love for things in their naked simplicity; I think that the
80tendency of science is always to awaken these two feelings; don’t you?
81
82I want to tell you what my feeling is about woman, but I can’t tonight
83because I would have too much to say. I have just got a letter I
84should like to show you. It is from a woman whose heart is being
85slowly broken, & the man who is doing it doesn’t know & doesn’t
86realize what he is doing. Why can’t we men & women come nearer each
87other & help each other, & not kill eachother’s souls & blight each
88other’s lives^.^ for unreadable There is no need why it should be so.
89
90I am coming up to live in London next week. My address will be 5
91Harrington Rd. South Kensington. After next Thursday. I shall like to
92know more of what Hinton thought, & of what you think. The question of
93woman’s having the vote, & independences & education, is only part of
94the question, there lies something deeper.
95
96Good bye.
97Olive Schreiner
98
99I love what you say about feeling a woman’s heart throbbing in you.
100
Notation
‘That little book’ is Edward Carpenter’s (1885) Towards Democracy Manchester: John Heywood. The other books referred to are: Walt Whitman (1855) Leaves of Grass New York: Brooklyn; George Romanes (1883) Mental Evolution in Animals London: Kegen Paul, Tench & Co. Which of Carl Vogt’s many publications Schreiner might be referring to cannot be established. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version is in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-vii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 May 1884
Address From7 Pelham Street, Kensington, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 19; Draznin 1992: 49
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
117 Pelham Street
2South Kensington
3May 12 / 84
4
5My dear Mr. Ellis,
6
7I have not got your letter. I found the House at 5 Harrington Rd. in a
8terrible condition & all the people drunk. The woman seized hold of me
9& would not let me have my luggage removed till I had paid her 30 /-,
10though I had only been 5 minutes in the house. I am quite sure they
11will have torn up any letters that came for me. I am very much
12troubled about it. I hope there was nothing in Hinton’s hand-writing
13in it ^(your letter)^ I am going to the house this morning to ask, but I
14know it will be fruitless. I don’t know in which part of London I
15shall settle. Until Friday this will be my new address, & I will let
16you know the new one.
17
18Olive Schreiner
19
20P.S. What a splendid fellow Carpenter must be. I have just been
21reading his article in “Today” It expresses what I feel so exactly
22that I seem to feel as if I had written myself. What kind of man is
23her? I think
24
Notation
Schreiner has mistakenly given her address as 17, instead of 7, Pelham Street. The reference is to Edward Carpenter's (1884) 'England?s Ideal' To-Day May 1884. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects differs from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in minor ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-viii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 May 1884
Address From7 Pelham Street, Kensington, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 49-50
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
17 Pelham St.
2South Kensington
3May 1112 / 84
4
5Dear Mr Ellis
6
7I have been to the place; I cannyot get the letter. I am very sorry
8about it
9
10Yours sincerely,
11Olive Schreiner
12
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 14 May 1884
Address From7 Pelham Street, Kensington, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 19; Draznin 1992: 51-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
17 Pelham St
2Wednesday After
3
4 [line torn away] ?letters this morning., but not the Harrington Rd one.
5Please write all that was in it over again.
6
7I shall like so much to go on Sunday, & will be glad if you will call
8for me.
9
10I’m sorry to hear anything that isn’t quite beautiful [line torn away]
11
12but don’t you think there must always be some sense of pain in
13learning to know more of people whom you have known only through their
14books? I think so.
15
16I went to St. James’s Hall last night. Every fibre in my being revolts
17against old Bradlaugh, & I wanted to like him. (This has nothing to do
18with what I said on the other page, it reads as though it had!)
19
20I shall like very much to see Mr. Hinton’s sister-in-law
21
22^Yours sincerely,^
23Olive Schreiner
24
25I shan’t leave this till Friday, & perhaps I shan’t have succeeded in
26finding quiet rooms by that time, quiet is so hard to get in London.
27
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. The short extract in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateNovember 1884
Address FromHastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToFred Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This note to Fred Schreiner is written on the back of a letter from Roden Noel to Ellis which Ellis had sent on to Olive Schreiner; this was returned enclosed in another letter Schreiner sent to Ellis on 3 November 1884 thanking him for passing these comments on, thus enabling dating. Schreiner lived at a number of addresses in Hastings between mid October 1884 and the end of April 1885.
1Please send both this by unreadable ^back^ unreadable & please send my
2big brown box too, Dadda.
3Good night
4Olive
5
Notation
Roden Noel's scrawled part-letter comments 'What a magnificent book you recommended me in the African Farm! O it is wonderful. Who, the foul fiend, wrote it or a woman? But it is too awfully sad, & has (for the moment) made me disbelieve everything - it makes me remember -- was not Lyndall quite right to choose that free life after her own partner? That’s what I should recommend instead of the polygamy of Hinton. Who wants & will or can maintain a dozen women?...'.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-ix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 16 May 1884
Address From7 Pelham Street, Kensington, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 19-20; Draznin 1992: 52-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
17 Pelham St
2South Kensington
3Friday
4
5I shall be at home all Sunday Afternoon so if you come at any time it
6will do. I am cannot travel by the Underground so we will have to
7start rather early.
8
9Thank you for the sonnets I will say what I want to say about them
10when you come. Is the fourth one from a woman to a man or from a man
11to a man? It is more beautiful in the latter case.
12
13I have been in such heaviness with my work today, & I have just made
14up my mind I must tear up & leave out a large bit. I have been so long
15in making up my mind.
16
17Yes, isn’t it beautiful how grateful those women are for little acts
18of tenderness. Ach, if you only handle their babies kindly how
19grateful ^& bright^ they look! Some of those hospital nurses are so
20unkind & rough with them. I wish I was back at my hospital work, the
21brain works better if the hands work too.
22
23I have been to the Brompton Oratory this evening & enjoyed the quiet &
24the music. I got a dark corner where I could kneel down.
25
26Thank you for your letter, but I am still sorry about the other one.
27
28I am so tired that I am writing everything upside down.
29
30Good night,
31Olive Schreiner
32
33PS.
34I shall be staying here till next Th Friday then I think I shall go
35back to St. Leonards, or to some country place.
36OS.
37
Notation
Ellis's sonnets were not published as a set until 1925, although some of them appeared contemporaneously in journals and magazines; see Havelock Ellis (1925) Sonnets With Folk Songs From the Spanish Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press. Schreiner's 'I am so tired that I am writing everything upside down' comment is because she had accidently turned the sheet of paper upside down to write on it. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) short extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-x
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 20 May 1884
Address From7 Pelham Street, Kensington, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 20; Draznin 1992: 56
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope.
17 Pelham St
2Tuesday
3May 20 / 84
4
5My dear Mr. Ellis,
6
7I enjoyed going with you to that lecture so much. Thank ^you^ for coming
8for me. If you are not too busy & do not feel it would be a waste of I
9time I should be glad if you could sometimes come & see me. It would
10be a help to me.
11
12I got another letter about Hinton this morning, from the same friend.
13I can’t help feeling that she didn’t understand Hinton, & that the
14other women of whom she writes did not understand him. I should so
15like to show you her letters, but I think she might not like it. If
16^she^ is right, I shall be sorry.
17
18I have made up my mind not to leave Town just yet. I shall remain here
19till Friday, then my address will be 32 Fitzroy Sq St., Fitzroy Square.
20
21Good night.
22Olive Schreiner
23
24That bus took me up to Holloway on Sunday night.
25
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 21 May 1884
Address From7 Pelham Street, Kensington, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 20; Draznin 1992: 57-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. The last insertion is written on the back of the envelope.
17 Pelham St.
2Thursday
3
4Dear Mr. Ellis,
5
6I have so much to say about Hinton & Hinton’s views (I have some
7questions to ask too) that I shan’t try to say it to-day. Thank you
8much for your letter & for the proofs.
9
10I send you a little bit of my friends first letter. I would like to
11send you all of both. In the second she tells me of a lady (of several,
12 but of one especially,) whom Hinton knew when she was a widow & whom
13he tired to make love him, & of how she burnt his letters & would
14never have anything more to do with him, &c, &c.
15
16The writer of the letter I send you is a Freethinker, & freer in ther
17her thoughts on social & moral questions than on any other. Though
18married happily herself she does not believe in formal marriage, but
19^only^ in a marriage of mutual consent &c, &c. So you see the ordinary
20narrow prejudices will not have acted in her case.
21
22Hinton says much in those proofs that I have thought & felt but never
23seen expressed before; but, I think, I see what he does not see, &
24where his theory [part of page torn away]
25
26human nature & in woman nature in Hinton. There is something to me
27infinitely touching in that last little note you read me of
28
29 [part of page torn away] I am going to see Herbert Spencer on Sunday week.
30
31Did Hinton aply the same measure to man & to woman? Would he have been
32satisfied if his wife had had six “spiritual husbands”? I mean this
33really as a question.
34
35I am writing this lying down; I hope you can make it out.
36
37^Please send back the enclosed.^
38
39^Have just got your note. Sunday suits me very nicely.^
40
41
Notation
The ‘little bit of letter’ enclosed is no longer attached. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 May 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 58-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1[part of page missing] I shall be at home all day on Sunday. Come as
2early as you like. I shall want to see you.
3
4I have heard that my sister is dead: she died suddenly like my father.
5
6Olive Schreiner
7
8
Notation
The first part of this letter has been torn away. Draznin's (1992) version of the letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 26 May 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 20-1; Draznin 1992: 59-60
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
132 Fitzroy St
2Monday.
3
4Dear Mr. Ellis,
5
6I enclose my subscription to the Progressive & 2d for a hymn hook.
7Last night after you went I read Miss Jones’s des-cription. I think
8I should like her very much. But Mrs. Hinton ins the woman I love.
9
10Will you some day show me Hinton likeness? You must come to see me
11whenever you care to. If you tell me what time you are coming I will
12stay in.
13
14I wish I was really your sister; it would be very nice.
15
16Don’t think of, & dwell, upon Hinton too much. I think it is not
17well for any of us to allow another another personality to submerge in
18anyway our own. ^Do you?^
19
20I have been walking about in the quiet part of Regent’s-park all the
21morning.
22
23Olive Schreiner
24
25I have just now got the note you sent to 7 Pelham St. There is some
26evil fate ^at^ work with your
27
28^letters.^
29
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 28 May 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 21; Draznin 1992: 61
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1Wednes-day.
2
3Come tomorrow afternoon if you can because on Friday I may have other
4visitors & then we can’t talk so well, & I have much I want to say &
5to hear.
6
7Yes, but you do let Hinton submerge you; & you mustn’t. It’s not
8good for you.
9
10Good bye.
11Olive Schreiner
12
13Any time will do.
14
15I shall be in after four & all the evening. I shall be glad if Miss
16Jones
calls. I shall not mention her having written that paper. I will
17give it you when you come. O.S
18
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 30 May 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 21; Draznin 1992: 62
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1Friday.
2
3I think when Mrs. Hinton say that we can “cure license not by
4restriction but by greater freedom” she is giving expression to one of
5Hinton’s quite truest ideas. The very fact of freedom takes away from
6the morbid desire which restriction has created.
7
8I only say what I do about Hinton because I see you take the other
9side. It’s my nature to be “kopach” (that’s a Cape Dutch word which
10means that when you turn a horse’s head to one side of the road its
11bound to go & see what’s on the other) I don’t think it’s quite a bad
12quality, at least it always makes one stick up for the absent. I love
13Hinton & I feel sympathy with him, when he’s most wrong I feel it most.
14 But why must I say I love him when you love him?
15
16What you say about jealousy is exactly what I feel. When we rise to
17the last, highest, white-heat of love all selfishness dies away. “And
18if I love thee, what is that to thee?” &, what do I ask of thee?
19
20I am going to find the quiet part of the park now. It’s so nice. One
21day when you have time come & I’ll show it you, please.
22
23It’s just because I know & feel you are so unlike Hinton in many ways
24that I don’t want your your you to be drawn out of your own I natural
25line of growth by him. Can you understand what I ?fee mean?
26
27I like Witman very much & I like those little essays.
28
29O.S
30
31Won If I am not able to go to Herbert Spencer on Sunday & send you a
32post card on Sat evening, will you be able to call for me on Sunday
33afternoon to go to the Progressive? Don’t if it will be troubling you
34at all.
35
Notation
‘And if I love thee, what is that to thee?’ is a Goethe quotation. Draznin’s (1992) version is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 5 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 62-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1Thursday.
2
3As soon as you had gone out I thought of my likeness. Please send it
4me. I hope you won’t take cold I have been reading that article & am
5much interested in it.
6
7Olive Schreiner
8
Notation
The 'that article' mentioned cannot be traced. A version of this letter is in Draznin (1992).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xvii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 9 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 63
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
132 Fitzroy St
2Monday.
3
4I didn’t give you Eleanor Marx’s note. I am just starting off to
5see my fashionable old lady, & to hear what she had for dinner.
6
7I enjoyed this morning so. I don’t feel that draw-back quite so much
8now, at least I didn’t this morning.
9
10Olive
11
Notation
A version of this letter is in Draznin (1992).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xviii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 11 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 22; Draznin 1992: 64-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
132 Fitzroy St
2Wednesday.
3
4You aren’t angry with me because of what I said on Monday, are you?
5You mustn’t be.
6
7I have so much to say but I am too stupid to say it. I have been lying
8down since yesterday afternoon with a heavy chest cold. I don’t know
9when I shall get to see Miss Jones. You aren’t angry with me, are you?
10
11O.S
12
Notation
A version of this letter is in Draznin (1992). Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) version is incorrect in minor ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 12 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 22; Draznin 1992: 65
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1Thursday
2
3I will like to come on Monday if I am well enough. I am glad you are
4not angry. I hope you will enjoy going to Oxford. I am still in bed, &
5so stupid
6
7Please let Miss Jones know I can’t come just now
8
9Olive
10
Notation
A version of thise letter is in Draznin (1992). Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in minor ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xx
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 15 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 22; Draznin 1992: 65-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1Sunday Morning.
2
3I am so sorry you have been ill. You & I seem to have had the same
4thing. It’s very funny. On Wednesday Thursday night my head got so bad
5throbbed as though it was going to burst. I thought Eleanor Marx was
6my sister Ettie.
7
8I hope you are quite better & that today’s journey will do you good.
9If my head is better I shall like to go tomorrow evening; if we don’t
10feel well enough we can just stay with eachother. My chest & throat
11are better now, it is only my head that is so bad.
12
13Dr. Donkin says it is nervous prostration that makes my head so. I am
14leaving on Friday week. Let us try to see as much of eachother before
15we ^I^ go as we can.
16
17Yes, I would be better for some mechanical labour; but when I am in
18the country I will work & think from morning till night.
19
20Miss Jones came to see me just after I wrote to you. I was sorry I was
21too stupid to talk.
22
23If you feel tired tomorrow evening to can just sit in the armchair & rest.
24
25Olive Schreiner
26
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 19 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 66
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. The envelope is a black-edged mourning one.
132 Fitzroy St
2Thursday Eve.
3
4I have been waiting for you as you don’t come I must go down to the
5Oxford where Dr. Aveling said he would wait for us at a quarter to
6eight. You told me any evening this week would do & Dr. Aveling
7can’t take me & Eleanor.
8
9I think the opera you mention will be good. I should like to go Friday
10night if you care to.
11
12Come & unreadable see me on Sat evening if you like, but not if you
13have any other work. My head is still bad. I hope yours keeps all
14right.
15
16Olive
17
Notation
Drazninss (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date19 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 67
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street from mid May to mid June 1884.
1I sent one note to your home address & send this to the Hospital. Are
2you going to the opera this tomorrow evening (Friday) I am making no
3engagements this week because I thought you would be coming this
4evening & perhaps tomorrow. Come on Sat evening if you care to & have
5nothing else to do, but let me know.
6
7I think the Flying Dutchman will be very good.
8
9My head is too bad to scribble much & I am going down to the Oxford
10where Dr. Aveling is waiting for us.
11
12O.S
13
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-57
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 12 July 1885
Address From9 Blandford Square, Paddington, London
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 68-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident in Blandford Square in July 1885.
1Sunday
2
3Yesterday was all holiday you are having & you need to be so helped &
4made strong for your work, & I don’t think I helped you. When they
5were reading Witman & you lay on the ground I looked at you
6
7It was sweet to want to come to ^with^ me to London Bridge but our Louie
8can’t go about alone like I can.
9
10Will you please let your coming to see me be entirely governed by what
11is good for the exam.
12
13I am so proud that you love me so much, it is so sweet to me. Can I be
14glad without thinking I am selfish. You love me so beautifully.
15
16Olive
17
18I got a Pall Mall.
19
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 24 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 69
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884.
1Tuesday.
2
3I should like ?ber to come with you tomorrow evening, & shall be here
4if you come at four. I was sorry after I got back thinking you
5hadn’t had any supper, & it would be so late when you got home.
6
7I am somewhat worried today about other people’s affairs. I should
8like to lie down & sleep only I’ve no time.
9
10I like that article on women very much.
11
12I’m glad Miss Jones is coming this afternoon
13
14O. Schreiner
15
Notation
'That article on women' cannot be established, but some time later Ellis published a relevant review: Havelock Ellis (1887) 'The Changing Status of Women' Westminster Review October 1887. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 June 1884
Address From32 Fitzroy Street, Camden, London
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 69-70
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Schreiner was resident in Fitzroy Street in late May and June 1884. This note was not posted but left for Ellis with Schreiner's landlady or in a public area for him to collect, with just his name written on the associated envelope. In the absence of other information, dating it has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by relating its content to other letters in the Olive Schreiner/Havelock Ellis correspondence.
1I have to go out to to see an American lady. I will be back by four.
2If I should be a few minutes late wait for me. Eh?
3
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this note is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 27 June 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 22-3; Draznin 1992: 70-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Holly Cottage
2Friday Night
3
4I got here this afternoon at half past six. I think the place will
5suit me. It is very quiet.
6
7Thank you for your letter.
8
9We have ?Mon only one post a a day here. So I do not know when you
10will get this.
11
12I am glad your mother & sister did not dislike me. I am very glad I
13went to see them. I can picture them ^your life^ so much better (I
14didn’t change that word I only scratched it out!)
15
16I feel a bit sad this evening, but that is only because the rain is
17beating on the trees outside & the place is strange to me. I think it
18is rather a sad place, but I shall work here.
19
20I have much I could say, but nothing I could write about. Write to me
21when you have nothing better to I do & it doesn’t interfere with
22your work. You have to work for an exam, havenot you?
23
24I feel very grateful to you; you are very good, & very tender, & ^very^
25true. Tomorrow I shall begin my reading & writing & have something
26rational to write about to you.
27
28Olive Schreiner
29
30If you write to me don’t put Woburn Sands, but just Woburn on the
31letter. I think I shall I give you the full address again because I
32fancy I didn’t give it right & it won’t find me if a letter
33hasn’t the full address
34
35Holly Cottage
36Mount Pleasant
37Aspley Guise
38Woburn
39Beds.
40
41I should be sorry to lose one of your letters. Olive.
42
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 28 June 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 23; Rive 1987: 42-3; Draznin 1992: 71-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Apsley Guide in late June and early July 1884.
1Saturday Morning
2
3How good it was of you to think so of me on Thursday night at two
4o’clock & to tell me so.
5
6The letter I sent you last night wasn’t real quite. I wanted to
7write otherwise, but I wouldn’t let myself.
8
9I am not well today. I have not been off the sofa since this morning.
10As soon as I stand up my head swims so, but all the time I lie there I
11have just the thought of you, & some-how I^i^t is pleasant. I think I
12have a heavy feverish cold, I hope it is not the place.
13
14Did you tell Louie all about me? Please do. I hope you feel happy &
15are able to work well. You mustn’t tell her or any one things that I
16tell you about other people but things that I are about myself alone,
17are in your hands, you can do what you like with them, & I shall think
18it right. I have such a strong feeling for Louie. When she put her arm
19round me on the sofa, I wanted to to cuddle ^close^ up to her, but I was
20ashamed. I liked it. I have such an odd feeling ^for her.^ You know when
21I tell you people have loved me or any thing of that kind you must not
22tell any one. Love that has been given you is too sacred a thing to be
23talked of to anyone (don’t you think so,) except just to the person
24who seems ^is like^ part of you & who will feel it as you do.
25
26Will you please tell me little things about your self, about your work,
27 & every thing like that. Is your finger quite better?
28
29Please tell our Louie every thing.
30
31I am so bad, I can’t write better than this today my head goes round
32& round. Whad did you think of that little story in the Mag?
33
34I want to do so much work. You don’t know how I am much better
35mentally since I knew you. I ought to work now.
36
37Olive
38
39It may be I shall be too ill in the next few days to write to you, but
40you can write still.
41
Notation
'That little story in the Mag' is likely to be one of the allegories originally published in the New College Magazine. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxvii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 29 June 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 23-4; Rive 1987: 43; Draznin 1992: 73-5, 76-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Holly Cottage
2Sunday evening
3
4I am a bit better this evening. I have been reading Heine. Isn’t it
5odd how when you sympathize with a any one in the main you sympathize
6with them in the little tiny things too. Now, Heine’s hatred to
7Wellington is so delicious to me. I never found anyone who could quite
8sympathize with my loathing for that man.
9
10I have read almost the whole vol. of Galton like it very much, ^because^
11it is suggestive, but he generalizes from quite insufficient data, it
12is ludicru [wordspace] some times. Didn’t it strike you so? I don’t
13know when a book has interested me more. I used to try & teach myself
14the multiplication table when I was small, & I couldn’t remember it,
15& I used to cry & pray about it. At last once (I don’t think it was
16in an instant but in a few days) I saw it. It is like a stair or a
17sloping plank & the figures on it in different shads
18(six-times-six-is-thirty-six, is pure, dazzling white) & now I never
19forget it I always see that. I have often wondered if other people saw
20figures in the same way. It isn’t so clear now as it used to be.
21
22I wish you had told me more about what you used to do & think when you
23were in Australia. I can’t tell everything intuitively! & I rather
24like to hear.
25
26Writing is not so nice as talking. When you talk you know it is for
27one ear only, when you write you feel as if it might not be so, & the
28sweetness is gone. Do you not feel so too? I am very much strong
29
30This place doesn’t suit me at all. I want to find a place that is
31not low & damp. If I go Derbyshire I think I shall feel glorious like
32I used to in the karroo. My mind is so full of thoughts that want
33artistic expression it is almost painful I must go where I can work.
34If I go to Derbyshire, & you felt you cared to come into the country a
35bit would that be too far for you to come? It is much more beautiful
36than here & it would do you more good. I fancy you must be like me &
37need stimulating air. Why we thought so strongly & brightly in the far
38away countrys had to do with other things except solitude.
39
40Don’t think too much of Hinton. Your nobler, stronger, many
41sided-self must not be crushed by him, or rather I should say warped,
42for it will not be crushed.
43
44Don’t trouble to read that MS. of mine till you have quite time &
45nothing else to do. The doctor there is my beau-ideal of a man. Do you
46love him a little?
47
48I had a letter from Mr. Norman this morning, & because I had not heard
49from any one else since I came here I was very glad to get it. I have
50not heard from my brother for fourteen days except one line. Mr.
51Norman’s
letter was ^only^ about some books he was going to send me.
52
53I still see always that thing that happened in the bus. Is it not
54strange that it should be so vivid?
55
56Good night. I am going to bed now. I hope you had a nice evening at
57the Browning society. With You know I have a feeling that if you ever
58really care about ^for^ a woman it will be a woman some^thing^ like that
59Lily in New Rush, only she will have a more animal nature, & she will
60crush you out ^completely^ ?powerfully ^mentally & spiritually. Don’t
61you think so.^
62
63Good-night.
64O.S
65
66I wonder if you went to the Progressive this evening. It seems so long
67ago since Herbert Spencer & last Sunday. Months & months seem to have
68passed since then. I wish I was dead.
69
70^When you think of any book it would be good for me to read please, if
71it doesn’t trouble your put it down, & I will put down any book I
72think of that I would like you to read. Did you tell me you you had
73not read Mill’s Logic? I wonder if you have now got on so far that
74it would not be of any help to you.^
75
Notation
'That MS. of mine' refers to Schreiner's unfinished and largely destroyed novel 'New Rush', with the doctor being a character in it. The books referred to are: Heinrich Heine (1880) English Fragments Edinburgh: R. Grant & Son. Francis Galton (1883) Inquiries Into Human Faculty London: J.M. Dent & Co. John Stuart Mill (1843) System of Logic London: Parker. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxviii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 2 July 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 77-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Apsley Guide in late June and early July 1884.
1Wednesday ^Afternoon^
2
3I got the letter you wrote on Sunday yesterday morning. I haven’t
4been well enough to answer it.
5
6This morning I got the note you wrote on Monday evening, & Louie’s.
7
8I have so much I want to say & I don’t know how to say it with my
9head like this.
10
11I have been quite quiet & happy in spirit since I got your letter
12yesterday morning. I am sorry I wrote you that note, but since it was
13a great help & comfort to me you won’t mind.
14
15You were right not to stay longer on Thurs-day. A few moments longer
16or shorter & you would have had to go all the same.
17
18Will you let me write & arrange for your going to see Philip Marston.
19I should like it so much.
20
21Isn’t this stupid! I try I feel half asleep. Chapman has written
22saying how much he wants to have my book. I got the letter this
23morning. When I get to Derbyshire I shall work away & be as jolly as
24possible.
25
26I haven’t been reading Heine or anything the last two days.
27
28Olive
29
30I know there was something I wanted so much to say, & I can’t think
31of it.
32
33Olive
34
Notation
Drazninss (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 3 July 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 25-6; Rive 1987: 44; Draznin 1992: 78-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Thursday.
2
3Thankyou. I would like to see your diary so much. I have a kind of
4journal, but that is mainly of events, not of thoughts & feelings.
5
6I’m ^no^to a bit afraid now. You do comfort me.
7
8I am just the same in body but it’s only the place, I mean the house
9& its position more than the place generally Did I ever tell you how
10my chest first got bad. I was four days quite without food, &
11travelling all the time; I had nothing but a little cold water ^all
12that time.^ I had no money to buy food. When I ate the first mouthful
13at the end of the time, I got this horrible agony in my chest, & bad
14to rush out & for weeks I never lie down night or day. I suffocated if
15I even leaned back. Ever since that if I get to a place that is close,
16& damp & hot, it comes back.
17
18I have been to many doctors, some say it is an affection of the heart
19some say it is asthma of a very peculiar kind. They all say they have
20never seen a case just like it, & I don’t like to tell them how it
21began. Some how one can’t go back into the past without blaming
22those that are dearest to one. & it is better to let the past dead
23bury its dead.^eh?^ I have not been able to go for any walks. Twice I
24have been for a little way & yesterday I walked up & down before the
25door. You wouldn’t know me if you were to see me; I look so funny,
26my face ^is^ such a dark red with the blood in my head.
27
28There is no need to be anxious about me. I shall be better when I get
29to a fresher breezier place.
30
31You will perhaps like to see some of the reviews of S.A.F. so I send
32you some. Send them back because they are my Dadda’s. I’m sorry I
33didn’t keep any. It would be rather amusing after many years – if
34I live so long – to look at them.
35
36You say I must tell you what I am doing, but I don’t do anything
37except walk about my room & try to breathe & lie down on my bed & try
38to breathe. I don’t think it would do for me to stay here long I
39feel as though if I did I should stay here altogether. [one side of the
40page has been torn off here]
41
42feel no passion. The passion is there, but something stronger
43over-rides it.
44
45I wish you could have had what you needed in Australia.
46
47I never used to want to be good. I used to want to know, & to be, & to
48do. Now I want to be good too. It is this time of pain that has done
49it. It has broken my spirit. I am much more pitiful & tender than I
50used to be. I love every thing that can feel. You will see the
51difference in any work I do now. Do you think it is for the worse or
52the better?
53
54I am glad you told Louie. I was afraid you wouldn’t & it would make
55you untrue. ^Please work very^ Love hard. & don’t let me trouble you.
56
57You know I’m not good at all. It’s because I've never told you any
58of the mean little things about myself that you I think I am perhaps
59better than you.
60
61I have much I want to tell you.
62
63You must say Aspley on Apsley.
64Good bye.
65Olive
66
67You must say just what you think about New Rush, & about every thing
68connected with me.
69
70You must not be anxious about me I shall soon be better.
71
72Olive
73
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxx
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 4 July 1884
Address FromAspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 26-7; Draznin 1992: 79-80
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Aspley Guise
2Friday
3
4Henry you are spoiling me by being so good to me.
5
6I can’t write because my bead is too bad. I have neuralgia which
7contracts my one eye. Will you tell me the name of a good head doctor,
8a specialist
9
10I have been lying all the afternoon talking to you in my mind I hope
11you will go in for the exam at the end of the month I should like it.
12I do not see that writing to me wil take much out of you if you say
13what comes first. Yes, it will be good for me that you write as much
14as you can. Your letters cool & strengthen me. Some day when you are
15in need of help I will help you. Send me that diary, please.
16
17I don’t think you are good in the common way when I say good I mean
18good to me. And by ‘good” generally I mean unselfish. I don’t
19know if I care for you much but somehow my m (no, I won't say that) I
20care so much about ach, I won’t say any thing of that.
21
22I shall prize being allowed to see that diary. I will show you my
23journal when I am with you some day. You wouldn’t be able to
24understand it alone. When I come to something wrong I put it into such
25words that one can’t understand. How close we are to each other.
26
27You would be sorry if you saw me because my head is very bad my eye is
28all drawn up, it has been for two day.
29
30Yes, it would spoil our relationship I feel like you do.
31
32I used always to be calculating. Now feeling comes in a flood &
33carries me away. You must help me to be calculating We must be strong.
34Tell me about what you feel physically & every whay way.
35
36Good night the other part of me.
37Olive
38
39^Henry I can’t look at my papers yet.^
40
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxxiHRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxxiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 6 July 1884
Address FromAspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 27; Rive 1987: 44-5; Draznin 1992: 80-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Aspley Guise
2Sun-day
3
4Yes, you must write to me everyday, when you want, & then let a week
5or ten days go without writing when you want not. If I feel wanting a
6letter badly I will write & ask you for one. And when I want a little
7love, expressed love, I will write & ask for that too. Sometimes I can
8do without it but some-times I need it.
9
10My address in Derbyshire will be c/o Mrs. ^Job^ Walker
11Bole Hill
12near Wirksworth.
13
14I would like to have your critical judgment of my mind or rather of my
15work, which is really me.
16
17What did you think of New Rush. You haven’t told me, & I won’t
18tell you what I think of it till you have. Do you think it would be
19right of me to publish it? I think not.
20
21I will like to see the Indian Review.
22
23Henry, there are some things you have said in your letter that are so
24sweet to me, they keep breaking into my mind so sweetly.
25
26When will I have the diary?
27
28I can’t write many things that I would say.
29
30After reading your article about Hinton last night I thought about him,
31 & at last I am coming to a true critical judgment. I will Good bye
32till tomorrow. Olive
33
34I treasure up all those things you said to me though I don’t say
35anything about them.
36
37Henry, I am going to lie down on my little bed in the corner.
38
Notation
The Ellis publications referred to are: Havelock Ellis (1884) 'Hinton?s Later Thought' Mind July 1884; and (1884) 'Recent English Fiction' Indian Review September 1884. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription, as is Rive's (1987). The extract in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxxiii-a
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 July 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 44-5; Draznin 1992: 81
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Apsley Guide in late June and early July 1884. The beginning and end of the letter are missing. Draznin (1992) places it as part of Schreiner's letter to Ellis of 6 July 1884, while we follow the archival order because paper and ink variations support this.
1 [top of page torn away] One reason why I am so bad here
2is that I get so little food & such bad food. I am almost starved here.
3 Have you ever found how one works in proportion as one eats? I don’t
4mean quantity. But if the highest creative work is to be done there
5
6 [top of page torn away] When I am striving to kill & crush out all that
7side of my nature as I have been for the last two years & a half, very
8nearly three years now, what do I produce? It was not that I
9deliberately tried to crush it, but it was such agony to me that it
10had to die. A man thinks when he touches a woman it is only her body
11he is touching, it is really her soul, her brain, her creative power.
12
13I am descended from the “Olivers” too. My great grandmother or my
14grandmother (I am not quite sure which, I will ask) was a Miss Oliver.
15That is how I came to be Olive. I have an Uncle called Oliver after
16her, & I am called after him, or rather after a brother who was called
17after him. On a little old family silver jug I have here, are the
18initials C.F.O. It’s very funny. I have an old Uncle called Oliver
19Lyndall still living in the North & I will write & ask him. Perhaps it
20is his mother my grandfather’s first wife who was an Oliver. My
21grandfather was a Presbyterian parson, old Dr. Campbell’s predecessor.
22^He must have been a wonderful old man.^ I wonder what more we are going
23be be alike in.
24
25I think you must be tired of hearing about my not being strong. I
26won’t say anything more till I am. Thank you for telling me about the
27Doctors. I want so much [page/s missing]
28
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxxiii-b
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 July 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 81
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Dating this part-letter has followed an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Apsley Guide in late June and early July 1884. The start of the letter is missing. Draznin (1992) places the letter as part of Schreiner's other letter to Ellis of 7 July 1884; however, we follow the archival order because of paper and ink variations and also because the sense does not follow on in Draznin's combined version.
1[page/s missing]
2
3power. It is putting his fingers into her brain & snapping the strings
4when he draws her to him physically, & cannot take her mentally. My
5Henry, there are so many things I should like to say if this was
6talking & not writing. We shall have so many things to say how shall
7we say them all when we are together such a little time.
8
9Good-bye.
10Your Olive
11
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this part-letter is different in some respects from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxxii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date8 July 1884
Address FromAspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 85
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is supplied by an associated envelope.
1Aspley Guise
2July 8 / 84
3
4I am so glad I am going tomorrow but I feel weak to pack Yes, I have
5the feeling as if you & I were so young together.
6
7The dream, the faith, that I should find some one just like my self
8was with me all through my childhood. I think one would hardly believe
9how youg young it was there.
10
11You could say what you like about me to Mrs. Hinton or anyone. I Did
12you think “New Rush” not myself? The only part that is is where he
13sits & sorts. If you could have seen my condition when I wrote it you
14would wonder that it have even the little bit of “cleverness” it
15has. Nothing else I ever wrote was “clever”; it was all out
16pouring. I don’t like New Rush at all. I don’t feel as if it
17belonged to me. Some times I feel inclined to publish it for the sake
18of the £15 I should get for it. But you don’t think it would be
19right do you?
20
21I felt sure you must ^suffer^ from neuralgia some times. I am a little
22troubled about your life: that journey to & from London every day by train
23takes more out of you than you think. Please take care of yourself in
24the way of eating. Neuralgia is always a sign of low health. If one
25can keep up the physical side no amount of feeling or thinking hurts
26one. I am at present resolving to take care of my self ^body,^ so must
27you. ^that we may be strong & work.^
28
29I will write to you as soon as I get to Derbyshire. Send the diary.
30
31Olive
32
33^It isn’t Aspley Guise that’s so bad it’s just this spot. Give my
34love to Louie.^
35
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1a-xxxiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 8 July 1884
Address FromHolly Cottage, Mount Pleasant, Aspley Guise, Woburn, Bedfordshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 86
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in Apsley Guise in late June and early July 1884, leaving on 8 July and arriving in Wirksworth via Derby on 9 July 1884.
1Tuesday Night.
2
3Have finished my packing, am so glad I am going.
4
5Olive
6
7Do you love that Saturday Reviewer?
8
9I am at Wirksworth all right
10-------
11Wednesday morning
12
Notation
The 'Saturday Reviewer' refer to a review of Schreiner's The Story of An African Farm as follows:

Saturday Review 21 April 1883: "The Story of an African Farm is clever, imaginative, original, and terribly dull. Yet it is only fair to say that the dullness is relative, or rather is the result of conscientious experiences during a comprehensive survey; for their are effective scenes and bright pieces of description which prove that Mr. Iron might be entertaining if he pleased. We own to a certain preliminary disappointment, for we fancied we should have a story of South African speculation and adventure on the borderland between savagery and civilization... so much for a novel which is a striking example of how a really clever and ingenious writer may overreach himself in ambitious efforts after originality."

Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.


Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 9 July 1884
Address FromDerby Station, Derby, Derbyshire
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 86
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992) in associating it with Schreiner to Ellis, 10 July 1884 (HRC/CAT/OS/1b-1), which was originally in the same envelope with it. Schreiner was resident in Apsley Guide in late June and early July 1884, leaving on 8 July and arriving in Wirksworth via Derby on 9 July 1884.
1Derby Station
2Wednesday
3
4I got here at half past twelve & find I have to wait 4 hours till half
5past four. I wonder whether I shall soon get your diary. Send it at once.
6
7I hadn’t such a bad journey. I had a carriage all to my self so I
8could lie down, & I could have gone fast to sleep, only I was afraid
9we might pass Derby. This station reminds me something of London with
10its noise & stir. Dear old London. You don’t know how happy the time I
11was there looks to me now.
12
13I am getting afraid that the new place will be just like the last.
14
15I wonder if you My head is so bad. There is such a pretty wall paper
16in this room it is quite nice to look at it. Wall papers have so much
17meaning for me. I could give des-criptions of many wall papers I saw
18when I was a child.
19
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-i
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 10 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 27, 27-28; Rive 1987: 45; Draznin 1992: 87-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. See also Schreiner's letter to Ellis of 9 July 1884 (HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xv), which was originally in the same envelope.
1Bole Hill
2Wirksworth
3Thursday.
4
5I found your letter waiting for me when I got here.
6
7The poems are all powerful except “Love & Life” which I think weak.
8 I like “The two loves,” very much.
9
10You are right in all you say about Marston. That is just it. You have
11no right to des-cribe him exactly in the same words I des-cribed him
12the other day though.
13
14I felt somewhat ashamed the other day after I had said that about
15sexual feelings. Fancy being ashamed of you. Now I’m not.
16
17About Hinton one reason why I can not feel quite the same about him as
18you do is that it seems to me that all that he says (except about a
19married man having one more than one wife, & that I have thought too!)
20is such old old property of mine. When I come to tell you all my life
21you will see that this is true. What I think is that sometimes he puts
22the true views badly, & not quite truly.
23
24But you are wanting to know about me.
25
26I got here last evening in the rain. This is a beautiful place, & a
27delightful clean little cottage off four rooms on the side of a hill
28over looking the little tiny town of Worksworth. It is perhaps not so
29pretty as some other parts of Derbyshire may by be, but to me who
30haven’t unreadable ^has^ longed so for my old hill life, it is so
31delightful One feels near God here.
32
33My chest is still so very bad. I hope I will be able to stay here. I
34like it so. There are only four little rooms in the cottage. I have
35such a beautiful little bedroom & sittingroom. If ever you should come
36here we will read French together. Only I am sorry there isn’t
37another bedroom in the house. We would have seemed somehow nearer if
38we had been in the same house. But there are plenty of cottages near
39by where I could get you a bedroom if you did come.
40
41I send you a letter part of which will perhaps interest you to read.
42It has made me so happy. It is the first tenderish letter I have had
43from my brother Theo for so many years. He is twelve years older than
44I am & when I was a child I used to worship him, & love him so. When I
45was ten & began to be a free-thinker he drifted away from me. He
46hasn’t cared for me much since because Christianity makes his whole
47life. He used to love me so. One day I will show you some little
48allegories & letters of his, the allegories about me, wonderful when I
49think they were written by a brother of three & twenty or so to a
50little sister of nine. Then he turned away from me so utterly when I
51began to think.
52
53I value this letter very much. It is only the last part that will
54interest you. Isn’t it funny that people I have loved most have been
55^of^ my own family & the people I knew best. It isn’t newness that
56attracts me, it’s oldness. The more I know things the more I love
57them, if they are lovable at all.
58
59How nice it will be to read French with you. If I do get better here
60it will be some time before I am fit for work. It is so beautiful here
61to me Henry. On the hill opposite some great stone quarries. It is as
62though something tore the hill open & said “Here, you shall see not
63only the smoothe but the hard strong stuff that is inside too.”
64Somehow I like quarries. ^so^. Some people think them ugly.
65
66Your little child.
67Olive
68
Notation
The poems referred to are Ellis's sonnets, which were not published as a set until 1925 although some of them appeared contemporaneously in journals and magazines; see Havelock Ellis (1925) Sonnets With Folk Songs From the Spanish Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) short extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-ii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 11 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 28-9; Rive 1987: 45-6; Draznin 1992: 90-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Friday Night
2
3I do feel better today. I have been sleeping ever since I got here, &
4yet not fast asleep.
5
6Henry, I am so depressed thinking of my work. You see, dear one, I
7have so cut up & changed the thing that there is hardly anything left
8& I don’t know how to put it together. This afternoon I nearly got
9off the sofa, & burnt the whole MS. I would give hundreds of pounds if
10I had never touched it, & published it just as it was [bottom half of
11page torn off]
12
13splendid scenes.
14
15We won’t think about that any more.
16
17This place is so beautiful. Behind the house is a place called
18“Black Rocks.” I am going to take you to it when you come. You
19will like it so. I do like this Derbyshire so much. I will be so happy
20if I can get well here & work. I is just the place that seems made for
21me. I have such a beautiful bedroom up stairs with a great white bed &
22a top with little brown flowers on it. If you & I were [bottom half of
23page torn off]
24
25right. The people were real in the novel; but they are not real in
26that epitomy.
27
28Dr. Aveling & Miss Marx are coming up to Middleton next week. That is
29about a mile & a half from this I can see the house on the top of the
30next hill. Alfred St Johnston is coming to visit too. At least he has
31written to ask if he can. He is at Birmingham.
32
33My heart is heavy over my work. It is heavy because I am in
34uncertainty, & nothing has the same evil effect on my nature as
35uncertainty. The question in my mind is this. – Is it best to set my
36teeth together & to bring “From man to man”, up to my standard, or
37to leave it & throw myself onto new-work? The last would be easiest I
38could do splendid new work, but something in me a kind of love for my
39work that perhaps no one can understand makes me feel that I must
40labour on at my work till I am satisfied. I think it was the devil
41made me unpick it. Ach, I will set my teeth, & work at it & make it
42something better than it was, eh Henry. I can’t have Bertie &
43Rebekah die. They are as much to me as ever Waldo or Lyndall were. You
44don’t know how real my people are to me.
45
46I am covering this with blots. I am tired I think that’s why. I will
47have your diary perhaps tomorrow
48
49Later.
50
51It is much later I am just going up to bed. What a troubled foolish
52letter the first part of this is. I am ashamed, not that you should
53read it but that I should feel so. Not good work is ever done while
54the heart is hot & anxious & fretted.
55
56It is a great comfort to me that you are feeling so able to work & are
57working. I sort of take it for my work & feel satisfied by it. You
58know Henry all these months when I have been in such suffering, & have
59had that yearing to do something for others that I feel when I am in
60pain I have always built upon the fact, “From man to man” will
61help other people, it will help to make men more tender to women
62because they will understand them better; it will help to make some
63women more tender to others; it will comfort some women but showing
64them that others have felt as they do,” Now if I were to tell it
65fall to the ground I should feel that so much of my life had been
66wasted, gone for nothing. Do you long so too sometimes to lessen the
67pain & suffering in ^the^ world? Especially the greatest agony, despair.
68That feeling is always growing in me & sometimes it breaks over me in
69a wave of passion. It isn’t for happiness or good to myself, or to
70make others merry, it is to lessen the suffering of others that I have
71to live. It is for this that I have lead the life that I have, that
72now when the power of self-feeling is almost worn out in me, I should
73comfort others.
74
75Good night. This is a poor letter but you want me to write just as it
76comes. Your, Olive
77
78Love to Louie & ask her if she hasn’t got one of her likenesses to
79spare for me
80
Notation
'The thing' that Schreiner had 'cut up & changed' and 'nearly burned' is the manuscript of From Man to Man. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-iiiHRC/OS/FRAGHRC/UNCAT/OS-159
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 30-1; Draznin 1992: 92-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is composed of a number of pages which are now separated in the HRC collections as the result of pre-archiving happenstance, and its beginning is missing. It has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1[page/s missing]
2
3Sh though mine is so completely blended with my mind, that it is not
4as strong in me. It is not so easily awakened in me, but it is much more
5intense even as a physical feeling I think.
6
7I am very glad you did not enter the church. How could you think of
8it? ^And yet in one way it would have suited you better than any thing.^
9I must have a long talk with you some day (perhaps in a letter) on
10your use of the word ?ol “God” & the old symbols generally. The use
11of them by people like ^you &^ me is never quite true. (That is what
12makes Hinton’s writings so false.) We cannot always stop to define
13what what we mean by God &c, &c, so the best way is not to use the
14terms at all. I have taken care that the word God does not occur in
15this last book of mine; hateful, damned name that it is. A word may
16become so defiled by bad use that it will take a century before it can
17be purified & brought into use again. I’m not explaining what I mean,
18but I think you will understand.
19
20I am now able to understand your feeling for Hinton it was just
21^principally^ the time at which he came to you that has made him so much
22to you, & I have now a new kind of feeling to Hinton myself.
23
24Your passion for that little girl who pulled up her stockings is so
25well to me. You darling!
26
27Yes, you did need nearness to a woman when you were in Australia. I am so
28
29 [top of page torn off] to [papertorn] to you & you to her. I think it was
30good for you both. For me all love was meant to he a curse & suffering,
31 – & yet, ^no,^ not a curse, one wouldn’t have been without it, but I
32hope I shall never love any-thing so again.
33
34You say on one page that you are writing it, & perhaps some one will
35one day read it & understand it, & love you. It [top of page torn off]
36
37^And^ When I was living just like you on a lonely farm & at night when
38my work was over going out to walk under the willow trees or at the
39dam wall, & I used to think “One day I must find him.”
40
41Good bye
42Olive
43
44I am going to keep your diary some time longer because I’ve
45
46not done with it yet. What made you delicate when you went out to
47Australia, my sweet? Goethe has been just for you what he has been to
48me & I think ^it was^ at the same time.
49
50Midday.
51
52I have just got your letter.
53
54Yes, I have felt afraid that in my feeling that Hinton had too much
55power over you I might effect you too strongly on the other side. But
56I think that in after years when you look back we “will” see that I
57have been to some extent right. Hinton, is a great man, the world will
58he better for hearing what he has to say; you are doing good work in
59helping the world to hear it. In truth I do not think it was so much
60dear old Hinton himself as the effect of Hinton’s admirers that has
61not been good for you. I can quite imagine that if I were among people
62who were always telling me I was a second George Sand, I might in the
63end fancy I was & lose some of my own virtues in trying to imitate
64hers. And yet I never would be George Sand, & I should lose Olive
65Schreiner who might be every bit as good.
66
67If you heard me defending Hinton to other people you wouldn’t say I
68“must like him a little”. I love Hinton because he had a great free
69loving soul. I hate his clinging to the old symbols when he didn’t
70cling to the thing meant
. & his fear of saying the things he meant in
71naked black & white. Darling, you mustn’t let me trouble you on this
72point. If you feel that I am not good for you in this way you must
73tell me not to write about it any more. Perhaps if all Hinton wrote
74were nakedly published that kind of holding back I complain of would
75be found not to be in the man. Yes, my boy, we are only children
76together, to help eachother to grow.
77
78Why did you tell me about that little cottage, & you all alone in it?
79Now I keep wanting it, & the only thing I can do is take a bedroom for
80you in a little house about a half a minutes walk from this. Yes, this
81is close to Wirksworth. It is the last house on the side of the hill
82above the little town. It is about a mile & a half to the station. The
83woman here charges me 25/- for board & all That’s not dear is it? I
84think the ^best^ plan will be ^to^ arrange that we take our meals together,
85 & you just have your bedroom in the other house. How long could you
86perhaps stay? It would be so much nicer if we could be in the same
87house, some-how eh?
88
89^Yes I want letters, but I mustn’t get them when you are busy.^
90
91Olive
92
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-ivHRC/OS/FRAGHRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/NFPg
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 98-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is composed of a number of elements, which are now separated in the HRC collections as the result of pre-archiving happenstance, and it has been dated by reference to an associated envelope. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1I have been reading Miss Jones’s letter again. I feel so sorry for
2her, but I feel so sorry for you I feel quite sore. When she says
3“you are of kin – whether Olive Schreiner is I don’t know” &c
4what does she mean? Of “kin” with Hinton, of “kin” with whom?
5I hope my darling has not been forgetful to her in her trouble. We
6must bring down our broad desire to help other people, & let it force
7itself down into the little tiny acts with regard to other people, as
8well as in our general thinking & working for their good. But I fancy
9you need less to be reminded of this than I do.
10
11Please write the names of some good books. I don’t know what to send
12for. Have you read the life of Ellen Watson? I wonder if it would help
13Miss Jones if I were to write to her a good deal, nice long letters,
14or if she would dislike it. What do you think
15
16Don’t let the thought of me keep you from going to see her, because
17you knew you are my own boy whatever you are doing. You must do
18what’s right, & what you feel you can.
19
20 [top of paper torn away] I have an idea now that what is the matter with
21me just now is hay-fever. I’ve never been just like this before. Do
22you know of any little quiet, country, sea side place near this part
23of England where I could go, & where you could come for your holiday?
24By the sea I am always so well, & I want to be so well when you are
25with me. This place is so beautiful & the quiet so sweet. I would like
26to live here always.
27
28 [top of paper torn away] good as I can [paper torn away] is best I left
29out those parts. I will make it best. You help me so.
30
31My Dadda writes to me some times, now & then a little note. You
32don’t know how good & thoughtful he is for me.
33
Notation
The book referred to is: Anna Buckland (1883) A Record of Ellen Watson London: Macmillan. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-v
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 17 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 29-30; Draznin 1992: 100-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Thursday.
2
3I have just got a letter from my Dadda. My little nephew is ill &
4wants so much to come & stay with me he keeps saying, that if he could
5be with me he would be quite well. My brother wants him to come to me
6for a fortnight coming. next Thursday, & for me to take him to Buxton.
7Henry, if I were there would you come there too? It would be better if
8we were there quite alone together – but it’ll still bye me & still be
9you. Henry, if you would rather come after he’s gone, you won’t stay
10shorter time because of that? The time you spend here won’t be wasted;
11it will be good for your work. You can do much writing here.
12
13When people I know are ill they always long for me, & I must always
14answer back to their longing. I should like you to see the little boy
15because I love him so much.
16
17Mrs. Walters is coming on Sat to stay with me till Monday. It is she
18who wrote those letters about Hinton. She was so afraid of my falling
19in love with you, that was why she wrote them. You would like her very
20much, she is more like you & me in character than anyone I know. She
21is something like you in the face too. That in Eleanor Marx’s letter
22about friendship is like we think. I am going to try & work to-day. I will.
23
24Do you know that when I went to Dr. Coghill at Venter (the well known
25chest man) he said that if I married I would be quite well. He sent
26his wife to talk to me. She told me her own case which was exactly
27like mine (, & what is funny she said her’s began through being
28starved at school just when she was first a woman) & she said that
29from the day she married she never knew she had a chest again.
30
31It can’t be hay fever. I sat in the hay field yesterday. The food is
32very good here. We shall have such nice little dinners & teas together.
33
34Olive
35
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) short extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-viHRC/CAT/OS/1b-viii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 21 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 34-5; Rive 1987: 47-8; Draznin 1992: 106-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is composed of a number of pages, which are now separated in the HRC collections as the result of pre-archiving happenstance. The letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent toSchreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Monday Night
2
3I am so tired. I did not go to to sleep till the dawn light was
4shining strong in my windows last night. ^this morning^. I walked down
5to Wirksworth this afternoon to get my letters. I have done a little
6good work today & yesterday. Worked with such intense enjoyment, &
7then I know my work is good
8
9The feeling of pleasure thrills all through me.
10
11N Good night
12Olive
13
14I have many plans about your coming. I wonder how you answered Miss
15Jones
. Do you write as if you understood what she meant? Tell me as
16much about these things ^as^ you like. I like to know about you.
17
18Tuesday.
19
20I liked the letter I got this morning so much.
21
22You will find that I know nothing at all of ^F^french, but if you will
23teach me a little while you are here I will easily be able to go on by
24myself. It will be the first time anyone has ever helped me to learn
25anything except when I was very little & my mother taught me to read.
26I have never been to school you know or had one sixpence expended on
27my education. When I think of all the advantages ^that^ other people
28have I sometimes feel bitter, or at least I used to, I don’t ^now^
29know. When people say it is unnatural for people placed as Lyndall &
30Waldo were to have such thoughts & feelings, I laugh to myself
31
32It isn’t that one can’t teach oneself everything, one can, but
33it’s at such a fearful cost of strength. That makes me sorry that I
34never had any help. I haven’t told you anything really of my life
35yet, I will when we are together. My work is getting on splendidly Its w
36You will think perhaps that I’m writing sheets & sheets, but I’m
37not. It’s wonderful what a lot of thought & feeling goes just to
38make a few lines when they are written.
39
40It’s not Hayfever, because I can go & sit in the Hay fields. I
41don’t dislike Shiller. He is one of the weak second order of minds,
42but I feel kindly to him. I have not read anything since I came here
43except a few pages of Heine & Emerson. My dreaming takes up so much of
44my time. I wonder if they have medical books at the London. Sometimes
45when I can read nothing else I can lose myself in reading the account
46of a disease & the various remedies & mode of treatment. It seems to
47me that such a marvellous light is to be thrown on the whole physical
48& mental being of man, remotely on the whole universe by the study of
49morbid physical conditions But this doesn’t account for the peculiar
50delight I take in such things. It is strange that every member of my
51family (, except one brother & the sister who died the other day) have
52this feeling. This desire to doctor, this interest in all that belongs
53to the study of disease. In my little mother & in my eldest brother
54tears come into his old eyes now, when he talks of his longing to be a
55doctor & who it couldn’t be. There is something quite pathetic in
56the way in which he potters over his boys will bottles of medicine,
57– a kind of inbred instinct that will out. Really I have not often
58heard of a complex instinct like that running in a whole family, have
59you? I was quite touched when I came to England & found that my eldest
60brother who had left home when he was twelve long before I was born &
61who had never seen any of his friends since had developed exactly the
62same passion that Theo, & Ettie, & Katie, & I had. Alice may have had
63it too, but she never told me of it.
64
65I am going for a little walk [bottom part of page torn off]
66
67for your neuralgia. I don’t think that “will” is Colonial. I
68know Mrs. Brown does it too instinctively. I think I do it when I find
69that it expresses better what I mean than if I said “shall,” & so
70on. When I was little I used to have a great many ways of talking &
71words I used that were different from other children [bottom part of
72page torn off]
73
74tell when [part of page torn off]
75
76^I suppose that’s why so little is known.^
77
78^This book is going to be awfully outspoken An African Farm was nothing
79to it in ?heat. Perhaps I shall have work with the publishers but they
80like to make money.^
81
82Olive
83
Notation
The poet Friedrich Shiller wrote, among many other things, the 'Ode to Joy' immortalized in Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and also as the anthem of the European Union. The book which was to be 'awfully outspoken' is From Man to Man. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version is misdated, includes material from the second part of the letter only, omits parts of this, and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) short extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-ix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 23 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 34; Draznin 1992: 108-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Wednesday
2
3I have read Leckys History of European Morals. That last chapter on
4women, was the first time ^thing^ that I ever heard or knew really
5anything of prostitution. It came on me like a flash, & it has had an
6effect on my whole life. “Is it necessary there should be
7prostitutes?¬ – then let them be set up on high as other good & useful
8things are – But it is not necessary, &, by God, it shall not always
9be!” That was my first feeling. His “History or Rationalism in Europe”
10also had great things for me at the time I read it. Read it if you
11have not. I read “Under-ground Russia” at Aspley Guise. Thank
12
13I shall send for the other books you mention [rest of the page torn off]
14
15The first time she came to see me it made me feel that I didn’t care
16to come any nearer to you or that you should come ^any^ nearer to me. A
17kind of disgust. almost. I do not feel that I am of kin with the
18Hinton school (^though^ I should love Mrs. Hinton ^very^ much, I know, &
19sympathise with her!) & it seems to me that perhaps you were right in
20that feeling of drawing back from me with regard to Hinton, darling, &
21that perhaps I was taking tending (in ^far as I had any influence with you)^
22to take you out of an influence that was good & happy for you, better
23than anything I have to give you.
24
25I have been reading Heine with pleasure; he helps one to forget
26everything, doesn’t he?
27
28I haven’t heard again from Eastbourne, but I think Wilfred is coming
29on Friday or they would have written. Yes, [part of page torn off]
30
31soon as he goes, if you care to come. [part of page torn off]
32
33^or come before. I would take rooms for you in Buxton.^
34
Notation
The books referred to are: Stepniak Kravchinski (1883) Underground Russia London: Smith, Elder; W.E.H. Lecky (1869) A History of European Morals From Augustus to Charlemagne London: Longmans, Green & Co; The History of England in the Eigheteenth Century London: Longmans, Green & Co; (1865) The History of the Rise and Influence of the Spirit of Rationalism London: Longmans, Green & Co. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-160
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 24 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 34; Rive 1987: 48; Draznin 1992: 110-11
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Thursday Afternoon
2
3I have been reading “Love’s Martyrdom” and “The Two Loves.”
4Do you know that there is great worth in them. I have first seen it
5clearly now. “The two loves” has power, not only power of thought,
6but power of expression, that is to me almost wonderful. It came on me
7just now with a thrill of pleasure when I was reading. The Woof of
8Reminiscence has wonderful word power also. It I think it it is the
9peculiarity of your^self^ & of all that belongs to you, that it ^you^
10im?proves^fold^ on acquaintance, it unfolds. Voice, manner, every thing
11unfolds, & shows more than one ^ever^ thought of. You are a kind of
12sweet surprise. Take great care of ^all^ the sonnets you write. All I
13have seen ought to be published except “Life & Love” That isn’t
14like you If I read it with out knowing it was yours I should never
15dream you had written it It has not that strength which nothing else
16of yours lacks, that strength which is shown most in your critical
17power & in your tenderness. I think you are tenderest ^strongest^ where
18you are strongest. ^tenderest^ I think those last lines of The Two Loves
19are so tender & strong.
20
21Dr. Aveling & Miss Marx have just been to see me. She is now to be
22called Mrs. Aveling. I was glad to see her face. I love her, but she
23looks so miserable.
24
25Henry, what a great & solemn thing love is. I want in my life’s work,
26 if I work much & live long, to show what a wonderful power love has
27over the physical & through it over the mental nature, over what we
28call the soul, the inner-self. In this book I have tried to show it,
29but you see when I wrote it I did not know what the last three years
30have taught. I can only now try to show it
31
32^here & there. Good evening friend.^
33
34Olive
35
36I am going to work some more now.
37
38^I have a funny feeling that I could write in the same room where you
39were. I don’t know if I could. I should like to try some day. Any
40other person stops utterly my mental work, but I was feeling just now
41that if you were lying on the bed behind me I should work just the
42same, better I think.^
43
Notation
The 'Woof of Reminiscence' and the other titles mentioned are of poems in Ellis's Sonnets With Folk Songs. See Havelock Ellis (1925) Sonnets With Folk Songs From the Spanish Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version is taken from Cronwright-Schreiner. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-x
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 25 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 34; Rive 1987: 48-9; Draznin 1992: 111-12
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to has been supplied by an associated envelope.
1Bole Hill
2July 25 / 84
3Friday
4
5I won’t say all I’ve got to say, just cram away for that old exam now,
6darling. I don’t understand your life quite, yet, but it seems to me
7that for the next couple of years your medical studies ought to stand
8a good bit to the fore. You will reap the benefit of them mentally, &
9in increased usefullness to others, & in many ways bye & bye.
10
11Oh, that was a sweet little story that came to me last night. Just
12like the one in the ^school^ Mag it is in character but much nicer. It
13is such a beautiful evening, & such a still light on the grass. Do you
14know that snuffing quinine does me such wonderful good. As soon as
15leave it off my chest gets asthma; isn’t that funny? I am very well;
16^shall^ be such a strong girl by the time you come! Forget me &
17everything for a day or two.
18
19^Your,^
20Olive
21
22^Nice you should do me good.^
23
24^You shall have such a rest when you come here. He shall be petted so.^
25
26^I’m saving it all up.^
27
Notation
The ‘sweet little story’ Schreiner was writing cannot be established but a number of her allegories were published in the New College Magazine. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 29 July 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 35-6; Draznin 1992: 114-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884. A large section of the second page has been torn away, leaving legible passages at the bottom of each side, but scattered words only down the edges.
1Tuesday Morning
2
3I was going to tear up the bit I enclose, but I won’t because perhaps
4you would like to see it. I can’t explain what I mean by this fear not
5even to my-self, perhaps you can for me. I am so afraid of caring for
6you much I feel such a bitter feeling with myself if I feel I am
7^perhaps^ going to. I think that is it. I feel like someone rolly
8rolling a little ball of snow on a mountain side, & he knows at any
9minute it may pass out of his hand & grow bigger & bigger & go – he
10knows not where.
11
12Yet, when I get a letter, even like your little matter-of-fact note
13this morning, I feel “But this thing is yourself.” In that you are
14my-self I love you & am near to you; in that you are a a man, I am
15afraid of you & shrink from you.
16
17^Do^ You know that butterfly that the artist of ^the^ beautiful makes in
18Hawthorne’s story?
19
20Thankyou for that notice about Will Sharp’s book. I mean to get it.
21How is our exam going. ?feeling ?miss It’s this dry-as-dust part of
22the work that must be so horrible. Especially, you see, if you don’t
23think in your future life of making the practise & study of ^medicine^
24it the central point (& I feel most distinctly that your “call” is f
25to literature, just as mine was, in spite of my medical longing).
26
27Yesterday I heard part of Ibsen’s play “Ghosts”, still in MS. It is
28one of the most wonder-ful & great things that has long, long been
29written. I wanted you so too, to be sitting there too ^by me^ to hear it.
30 There was one line that touched the^se^ last three years. It made me
31almost mad. I cried out aloud & I couldn’t help it. Please If there
32had been a hundred people there I could^not^ have helped it.
33
34I have just got a telegram from my brother to say I must be in [paper
35torn away]
36
37is a friend of Mrs. Walter’s. His, from what she tells me, is another
38case in which the sister has been the determining & good power in a
39man’s life. This sister whom I
40
41 [paper is torn away]
42
43Good night
44Olive
45
46Mrs. Walters says that I seem years unreadable gladder younger than
47when she saw me this time last year, like just as if I were only
48fifteen. Do you know it is you who have made me feel so young. Almost
49altogether you. I feel younger much
50
51^than when I was about a child of ten. Your Olive^
52
Notation
The 'bit enclosed' is no longer attached. The books referred to are: Nathaniel Hawthorne (1846) 'The Artist of the Beautiful' in his Mosses From an Old Manse New York: Bohn's Standard Library; Henrik Ibsen (1881) Ghosts (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Griffith, Farran & Co. The reference to Will Sharp may be to the poet; see William Sharp (1889) American Sonnets London: Walter Scott. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is different in some respects from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-i
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1884 ; Before End: 1889
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This is a scrap of paper torn away from the page of a now untraceable or destroyed letter. It is on paper of a kind Schreiner used in the mid and late 1880s and thus how it has been dated.
1 [page torn away] & saw
2
3for my book last night when I
4
5 [page torn away] Please tear up.
6

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-ii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 2 August 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 36-7; Rive 1987: 49-50; Draznin 1992: 118-20
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Sat. Night late
2
3I have just come home with Wilfred from a concert. I am tired but I
4want to write to you. I have so many plans about your coming, &
5don’t know which will be best. You see at Bole Hill it is nice, & in
6some ways I want so much to be there, but the Avelings being at
7Middleton makes it all different. I am beginning to have such a horror
8of Dr. A-, other-self. To say I dislike him doesn’t express it at
9all, I have a fear, a horror of him when I am near. Every time I see
10him this shrinking grows stronger. Now you see when I am at Bole Hill
11they come every-day to see me. We shouldn’t be much alone, & we have
12so many things to talk about. At Buxton we should find it too
13townified, & besides dearer than you & I like. I think the way would
14be for you to come here on Monday evening, & stay till Wednesday when
15we could talk over going back to Wirksworth, or taking rooms at
16Miller’s Dale or some out of the way little village.
17
18You see, Henry, we have so many things to do & to talk about. It may
19^be^ the last time we are together ^(^(certainly for months,^)^ perhaps for
20years. likely will be I have to stick to my book till the winter (& I
21don’t know that I shall have it ready by November.) Then I shall
22have to go to the South of France or at nearest to Ventnor. And if we
23are at Wirksworth the Avelings will be always with us. I love her, but
24he makes me so unhappy
25
26I think you had better come here on Monday & stay till Wednesday ^eh^? I
27can get you the little room Wilfred has. I wish I had read Bebel’s
28book before you came I couldn’t get a copy. Now until my little boy
29goes I shan’t be able to look at a book or a news paper. When he is
30with me I only play & amuse him, & walk about with him from the time
31he gets up till he goes to bed. Then I am too tired to read or write.
32
33We must read all we can on the woman question, just now it is our
34question. In after years it may be something else. I will tell you
35about “Ghosts” when you come. I touch deals with the question of
36equal moral laws for both sexes, & of physical relation ship even
37between a half brother & sister “when good.” - & with what
38wonder-ful art it deals with the subject! It is a translation by
39Frances Lord. The book is considered too strong even on the continent,
40what with they think of it in England. She is trying to find a
41publisher for it, as she lost heavily on “Nora”.
42
43Do you know that Wirksworth is the scene of Adam Bede & that George
44Eliot’s aunt lies buried there? Ach, I want you to see Wirksworth,
45ugly as it is; we will arrange everything when you come. Wherever we
46are we will rest together. I do tell you about myself. My chest aches.
47Wilfred is 12 years old, & just as tall as I am. His eyes are
48something like his father’s but the lower part of his face is his
49mothers.
50
51Yesterday we were rowing on the lake a in the morning, ^in^ the
52afternoon I took him to see a cavern, in the evening to a concert.
53Today being Sunday I am going to take him for a long walk & tell him
54stories. I am so
55
56You can’t think what a horror I am getting to have of Dr. A. He is
57so selfish, but that doesn’t account for the feeling of dread. Mrs.
58Walters
has just the same intuitive feeling about him. I had it when I
59first saw him. I fought it down for Eleanor’s sake, but here it is
60stronger than ever.
61
62G Sunday Morning. Your little letter has come. Yes, when I don’t get
63a letter from you I go about so restless, it makes me bad. I hope you
64will get my book this morning or tomorrow.
65
66^That will do instead of a letter.^
67
68Olive
69
Notation
The book Schreiner has to 'stick to' is From Man to Man. Frances Lord 'lost heavily' on her Ibsen translations; see Henrik Ibsen (1881) Ghosts (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Griffith, Farran & Co, and Henrik Ibsen (1882) Nora (later A Doll’s House) (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Giffith, Farran & Co. The book Ellis might get the next day is likely to be is the manuscript of Undine, which Schreiner sent him and he kept until it was published by Cronwright-Schreiner after her death. The books referred to are: August Bebel (1884) Woman in the past, present and future London: Reeves; George Eliot (1859) Adam Bede London: William Blackwood & Son. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-iii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 4 August 1884
Address FromBuxton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 37; Draznin 1992: 121
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Buxton
2Monday
3
4No letter from you this morning. I have a bad cold on my chest, & lay
5in bed. Bring something interesting for us to read when you come;
6though with all we have to say, our walks & our French-reading, we
7shall not have much time over.
8
9I should like to know Miss Hadden. Were you ever a wee bit in love
10with Daisy Hinton?
11
12I have to take my little boy to an entertainment this evening. This is
13a very short note, but you would rather have it than nothing I does us
14such good to get letters from each other
15
16Olive
17
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-iv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 5 August 1884
Address FromBuxton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 38; Draznin 1992: 122-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Upside down on the bottom of the second side of paper and crossed out is 'Pavilion St Buxton'.
1Buxton
2Tuesday Night
3
4Sweet, I am soon going to bed very tired. We went for a drive this
5morning to a place called the “Cat-&-Fiddle.” I must go to it with
6you. It is the first ^& only^ place I have seen in England that gives
7one that feeling – the feeling we both miss so here. It is a bare
8wild mountain top 2000 feet above the see. You have that sense of
9solitude even though there are many pl people near you. This afternoon
10we went for a walk to Miller’s Dale. That too is beautiful, but it
11is the English “beautiful,” not ours. You know Wirksworth isn’t
12beautiful a bit compared to this part of Derbyshire it is quite ugly &
13common.
14
15I am not quite sure if Wilfred will go on Monday, but I think so. I
16took your letter with me & I read it at the “Cat & Fiddle.” & this
17afternoon at Miller’s Dale. I must get that article in the
18Nineteenth. I like Seely so. Now he is a man to whom I feel “a-kin.
19” That is something quite different from merely admiring a writer,
20very much admiring him. I always feel (did from the first moment I
21opened his book) akin to Emerson.
22
23I never read now, never touch a book You can’t think in what a
24completely stupefied state of mind I am. I can’t even make stories
25to myself after I go to bed. Tomorrow we are going to the Valley of
26the Goyte. ?I ?want ?might Goodnight my brother. How nicely I will
27rest when I know you are sleeping in a room not far off
28
29Olive
30
31^I have such heaps of things about Eleanor Dr. A – & all sorts of
32things to talk about.^
33
34Your little comrade.
35Olive
36
Notation
Schreiner read many reviews and journals and her reference to an 'article in the Nineteenth' is a mistake, for Seeley's article appeared elsewhere. He published three linked articles on Goethe in as follows: John Seeley (1884) 'Goethe' Contemporary Review, August (pp.161-77), October (488-506) and November (pp.653-72) 1884. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-v
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 8 August 1884
Address FromBuxton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 38; Draznin 1992: 124-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Buxton
2Friday.
3
4I am so glad that exam is over. Even if you haven’t passed it it’s
5something to have got rid of it. But I hope you have.
6
7I think you must come on Tues-day. I have to take Wilfred to Derby on
8Monday afternoon, shall not be back at Wirksworth till late in the
9evening, & I don’t want you to come ^just^ when I am too tired to stand
10or move. I think we had better go to Wirksworth straight.
11
12I didn’t write yesterday because I was very tired. I will explain to
13you about my style when I see you. I never know why I do ^write^ things
14in a cer-tain way when I write them, but I can generally find out if
15think afterwards. I think what you mean is what I called “writing
16ribbed” I don’t know when I invented that term for a certain style of
17writing; I am changing a whole chapter of “From man to man” from what
18I call the plain into the “ribbed” style. Sometimes the plain is right,
19 sometimes the “ribbed.” I think I generally write descriptions in the
20plain, & philosophize or paint thought in the “ribbed.” (You know in
21knitting there are two stitches, one makes a plain surface & the other
22makes ribs; I think I got it from that. Ribbed knitting isn’t smooth
23it goes up & down, up & down).
24
25I wish Dr. A wasn’t at Wirksworth.
26
27Good bye till tomorrow my own friend what a difference you make in my life.
28Olive
29
30If I’m not well enough to go about with you you must go alone for
31walks. I want you to see everything I’ve seen.
32
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-vi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 9 August 1884
Address FromBuxton, Derbyshire
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 38-9; Draznin 1992: 125-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Buxton
2Saturday
3
4So glad my brother has passed. I had set my heart on it.
5
6Odd that you have just the same kind of feeling to Miss Jones that I
7have, & it seems so wrong to me, & I can’t help it.
8
9Bring letters of yours & lots of things about yourself, & I will show
10you many of mine. You had ^better^ come to Matlock, not Wirksworth
11station I think, there are so few trains from Derby to Wirksworth, &
12both ^stations^ are about a mile & a half from Bole Hill. Tell me which
13way you are coming, & by what train on Tuesday. If you can tell me
14exactly ^at what time you will come^ & you come from ^the^ Matlock ^way,^ I
15will meet you at the top of the Cromford Hill, if you are walking. But
16I think you will have to drive as you won't he able to carry your bag
17all that way, the road is so steep. I wish
18
19Your sister
20Olive
21
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-vii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 27 August 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 127-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Boll Hill
2Wednesday Night.
3
4It seems so long since this morning days & days.
5
6Now Mr & Mrs Walker have gone to bed in your room & am sitting here at
7my little table. ?I ?wonder unreadable You have had a wet cold day for
8your journey. I’m afraid you were very tired when you got home. It has
9rained here all day.
10
11Mrs. Walker asked me this afternoon if I was engaged to you. I said,
12no. I haven’t been able to write this afternoon so I have done ever so
13much needle work Tomorrow I am going to get up early & work. I feel so
14happy in mind, only this afternoon when I looked out at the window I
15saw a man on the road from Wirksworth with a black bag in his band & a
16black hat, & tall, & it made it seem somehow as if you ought to be
17coming. I didn’t like it. I feel much less in spirit to work than when
18you were with me, but that will pass tomorrow.
19
20Harry, you must do a good deal of work, & don’t let your reading &
21thinking run too much in one line.
22
23I felt I shouldn’t sleep so I asked Mrs. Walker to give me a whole
24glass of beer to drink before I get into bed.
25
26Good bye, my own friend,
27Olive
28
29Could you find out & tell me what the charge for copying MS. is I know
30there are many people at the British Museum who do it.
31
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 28 August 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 39, 39; Rive 1987: 50; Draznin 1992: 128-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) The Letters. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1Thursday Night ^9.30.^
2
3I have been working since nine o’clock this morning. Have not left
4off even to eat, eat walking up & down. Have ?ha not laid down today!!!
5 Can you believe that? I feel as if I must write to you this evening.
6I have to keep on working or I would miss you. I haven’t been out of
7doors today, but could see such a lovely light on the grass. I wanted
8to go for a walk with you.
9
10Weren’t they glad to see the boy at home. How was the cream? I am
11afraid it was butter. And the eggs. I ought to have packed them.
12
13I haven’t heard again from Blackwell, but I think I shall be able to
14go on Tuesday.
15
16What of the Avelings? Be sure you don’t mention to anyone our my
17idea about the debt, because it might set other people to whom he owes
18money on him.
19
20I am going to read Emerson now. You know he is just like a bible to me.
21 It comforts me so.
22
23I wonder if there will be a letter from you tomorrow. Does it seem
24long to you since you went too?
25
26Good night now, my boy,
27
28Olive
29
30Friday.
31
32I have your letter, & the toothbrush.
33
34Let not your heart be troubled neither let it be sad or afraid.
35
36I think the great difference between us was is that the goodness which
37I only strive after, you have.
38
39There is one word in your letter I can’t make out. I send it to you.
40I am disappointed that Louie was not athome when you got there. I
41wanted her to be there to comfort you.
42
43You seem to have had such a good effect on my mind. I am working
44better than I ever have since I came to England.
45
46I ?wond I think I do understand you.
47
48Olive
49
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1992) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Extracts from the letter appear under different dates in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) and these are also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 29 August 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 39; Draznin 1992: 130
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. The last insertion is on the back of the associated envelope.
1Bole Hill
2Friday night
3
4Walked down to Wirksworth this afternoon to buy quinine & see if there
5were letters; was caught in the rain. Have come back, & am sitting in
6my bedroom: by fire burning & gas lit. It looks so nice & bright, my
7heart doesn’t keep getting cold like last evening.
8
9I have been working all day though I have not written much. I have
10been tearing up. I did a splendid bit this evening, though; or rather
11it’s come to me, I haven’t written it yet. My brother wants me to
12go to town to see those Cape people, but I don’t feel as if it would
13be right to leave my work just now.
14
15My stomach is quite right ^well.^ I have nothing the matter with me. I
16haven’t got my library books yet. I like to hear about the little
17things you do in London & where you go.
18
19Sat morning.
20
21Have your little note. Do you know that since I came to England I have
22never felt in mind as I do now. So able for work. Henry, you are good
23for me, about the best thing that ever came into my life.
24
25How is your liver now? You mustn’t fancy that you had anything to do
26with my being so stupid of body the last week. It was only that
27Cromford was too low for me, & I was stupid when you came, my strength.
28 I do feel near you. I can feel your heart up against mine all the
29time. I am glad they think you looking stouter a little. I should like
30to make you quite fat with happiness & sleep (it isn’t eating that
31makes one fat) & I’m sure you would be better for it. Have you
32noticed that all highly nervous people are better the stouter they are
33& worse the thinner they are. I know it’s so with me. Phlegmatic
34people again are nearly always better when they are thin. Of course
35this is just generally speaking. Olive.
36
37^Thanks for the toothbrush^
38
39^I leave for Black Well Farm on Wednesday morning. Had a letter from St.
40 Johnstone this morning. Read a lot of French last night before I went
41to bed.^
42
43^I have Mrs A’s address.^
44
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-viii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 31 August 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 133
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This address this letter was sent to is provided by an associated envelope. Schreiner stayed at Bolehill near Wirksworth from early to late July 1884, moved to Buxton for about ten days, and then returned to Bole Hill from mid August to early September 1884.
1^My bedroom^
2Sunday Afternoon.
3Sept ^Aug 31st^ 1884
4
5I have just got your Friday evening letter. It is very sweet to me.
6How strange you should have such a longing for music; the day you went
7I kept feeling “Oh if I could hear music, if I could hear music.” & I
8have been feeling more or less the same ever since.
9
10My heart, my sweet heart, has it got dull aching sensation! [bottom of
11page torn off]
12
13your Pocket Book? I think you will have to send a weekly copy of it to me.
14
15I am reading Lange History of Materialism. I like it very much It
16doesn’t exactly hinge in with my work somehow though. A notice of a
17terrible case at the Diamond Fields of abducting young girls for
18prostitution has much more fallen in with it. I haven’t been for a
19walk since you left except that once to Wirksworth. When I feel I
20can’t write any more I go & sit ^walk^ at the side of the house where we
21used to sit. Ach, Harry!
22
23Good night.
24Olive
25
26I shall be at our Farm at 10 o’clock on Wednesday. I don’t hate
27Bakewell, Harry.
28
Notation
The book referred to is: Frederick Lange (1877) A History of Materialism London: Trubner. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-ix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1884 ; Before End: 1889
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This scrap of a letter has been torn away from the rest and cannot be matched with any surviving letter or part-letter. It is written on paper of a kind Schreiner used in the mid and late 1880s and thus its dating.
1 [paper torn away] evenings
2
3 [paper torn away] comfort
4
5 [paper torn away] to you.
6 [paper torn away] I might have
7 [paper torn away] ?here, Henry.
8
9 [paper torn away] Burn this.
10

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-x
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 2 September 1884
Address FromBolehill, Wirksworth, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 135
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Bole Hill
2Tuesday Afternoon
3
4I send you the photo, but you must throw it away when I send you
5another. I don’t like such an unpleasant thing shown, but it
6doesn’t matter if you like it.
7
8You needn’t tear up any mor of my letters if it really hurts you. I
9can’t think that tomorrow I shall be
10
11^going up our road.^
12
13Olive
14
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 3 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 40; Rive 1987: 50-1; Draznin 1992: 136-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. The final insertion is written on the back of the envelope.
1Blackwell
2Wednesday Ngt
3
4I got here this afternoon. The woman is so horrible: they want me to
5take & pay for the room that I didn’t ?st take. I don’t know what
6to do or where to go. Would you go for me to Eleanor, or rather would
7you find out where she is ^at once^ & send this letter to her. I have
8written to both the addresses I thought would find her & got no answer.
9 It is to ask her for the address of those rooms Miss Harkeness had.
10Also if it wouldn’t be too much trouble could you get me the
11addresses of some rooms some where in the part Miss Jones used to live
12in. But don’t trouble about this as I will very likely find rooms in
13Ventnor. Henry I just feel in despair. I am so weary of roving about.
14I shall do no work I shall do no good in the I world if I can never
15find a place to rest in Now, for the next week or ten days till I am
16settled I shall not be able to put pen to paper. I feel so weak & I
17feel so tired, love. Put your arms round me. Yes, I know you do & it
18helps me so. I am unwell & I have such pain in my body. I feel so weak
19as if I wanted someone to stroke my hair. Oh I haven’t any where to
20go to I must have a place somewhere if it is only one tiny little room
21& no one shall turn me out. My comfort, my boy, you do let me rest my
22head against you. Please write to me. Above all things any rooms you
23get must be quiet quiet quiet. I only want to rest I don’t want any
24thing else.
25
26When the woman was talking to me I began to cry & I’ve I been crying
27ever since. I can’t stop my self. I wonder if my physical state has
28anything. I’m not so weak generally, as to let anyone see me cry. I
29have been wanting you more all these days than I have let myself know
30I have been trying to forget it & work. I passed our caves. Harry they
31didn’t look like when we were there. It was in us the beauty. Your
32little sister wants to know how your
33
34^mother is & Louie’s hand. Good night. When I go to bed I shall think
35how you love me.^
36
37Olive
38
39^Wednesday afternoon^
40Have arrived at Blackwell. Written at Blackwell.
41
Notation
Louie Ellis was also in correspondence with Schreiner, and while none of Schreiner’s letters to Louie survive, three of Louie’s letters to Schreiner are archived with the Ellis materials in the HRC collection. Immediately before this 3 September letter to Ellis, Louie and Schreiner had been in correspondence about a dress Louie was making for her; Louie’s comments on this (HRC/HavelockEllis/Misc/LouieEllistoOS/3) are as follows::

‘Sunday night.
Aug. 24th 1884

My dear Olive,

Thank you for wanting to write me - & doing so. You must be sorry that Henry is coming home. I am very glad, only sorry for you - & perhaps you are glad for me – so it mitigates it all round. Why do you call him Ellis? There is a comradeship about it, but I don’t like it. I don’t want to wear boy’s clothes, exactly – a gymnastic costume, comes near my desire. But I’d be content to begin with some g flowing gown which would not encumber one. I’ve forgotten what we planned. I was trusting to H. to remember when I mentioned it. It was a loose body, because a tight body tho stays is an anomaly and I think a long plain ^or knitted or tucked^ short – just escaping the ground – that makes you look tall – your ?silk was rather too short – (you’ll excuse me won’t you) and the sleeves must be tight – tho’ I don’t like tight sleeve – because one looks so broad - and you know that bright soft gypsy red, that’s the color that wld suit you. Walking along the other day – I was charmed with a girl’s dress – it was in the Island – down a lovely winding road – with an old wall on one side – she was walking in the road – with a gypsy red shirt on & ^a^ black body holding a basket. No artists’ forethought could have introduced a better bit of color into the landscape.

Its very hard for me to imagine you sitting with your hair down – as I’ve never seen you without your bonnet!!

I’m so glad Henry is better – he hasn’t had a rest for a long time – he only rushed to Paris & back last year you know - & had ^with^ a male friend.

I am in a night dress & dressing gown - & my hair is screwed up in brown papers, showing my “noble brow” as my friends say; the appearance is very comic.

Goodnight dear, this hot weather in Anerley tires me very much. Louie.

^Mother sends you her love.^'

Draznin’s (1992) version of Schreiner’s letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 4 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 138-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1Thursday morning.
2
3It is funny that man should have told your character so nearly.
4
5Thankyou for the prescription.
6
7The landlady came in this morning & I agreed with her to remain paying
8her more. But this room is so damp I don’t think I shall be able to
9slay more than two weeks.
10
11You might as well still send my letter to Eleanor. You can get A’s
12address from Fulger or someone. & if you do happen to be in the North
13& see apartment to let you might take the address. I don’t want to
14give more than from 12/- to £1 for my rooms. I think somewhere at
15Hampstead I might have gone nice rooms if I had looked out when I was
16in London Now if I do come it will be only be for a week on my way to
17St Leonards or Ventnor (unless I could find such quite airy rooms that
18I could work in them).
19
20Henry I keep getting dizzy. I hardly know what I’m writing I do feel
21so ill.
22
23Don’t miss writing to me just now because your letters are the one
24thing I look to. Thank you for the names of the flowers. [bottom of
25page torn off]
26
27^I’m so glad you are better, my sweet.^
28
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 4 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 40; Rive 1987: 51; Draznin 1992: 139-40
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark. The final insertion is written on the back of the envelope.
1Blackwell
2
3Thursday afternoon
4
5Thank you so much for that prescription. I am going into Buxton the
6first day I can & I will have it made up. I have not had that funny
7kind of indigestion since you left, but my stomach is so weak that I
8can take nothing. I think that is partly why I am so bad. You know how
9splendidly I could eat when you were with me – the cream.
10
11I have such sudden wild out breaks of crying that weaken me so. (This
12afternoon I got up & walked down the road past the rock we sat under &
13our cave, & suddey^nly^ this suffocating feeling came to me, & I was
14crying out, I couldn’t bear it. It’s partly because my stomach’s
15weak, don’t you think so? You like me to tell you about myself
16don’t you? I like so when you tell me little things about yourself.
17
18I have been trying to read all my books to-day but there isn’t one I
19can make anything of, not even Emerson. I began reading his Friendship
20because you read it, & it made the crying come on. It’s just
21weakness. I’ve not often in my life felt like this. Please be sure &
22write to me every day for a little while. I’ll tell you when I’m
23better.
24
25I wish I had a novel to read, something that would take me out of
26my-self.
27
28I send you Mrs. Moulton’s letter. Perhaps it may interest you as
29you’ve read her poems.
30
31Fancy I’ve never asked her if she was married. I’ve never liked to.
32 I fancy she is I’m going to ask her in my next. I feel better while
33I am writing this. You can show our Louie my Rem. if she cares to see
34it. But show her what you copied not the other book. I don’t like
35anyone but you to see it.
36
37^Are the teeth getting white. Tell me little bits of news about where
38you go. I have never had my head felt. Let us go together some day. I
39am still longing for music.^
40
41Good bye
42Olive
43
44^Harry when I look out of the window it seems T.O.^
45
46^just as if my heart were breaking. I can’t bear this view. I makes
47me mad almost.^
48
49^The Avelings didn’t pay their bill at Needles and the man is in a
50great state.^
51
Notation
The 'other book' that is not Schreiner's 'Remembrances' is not certain but could be Undine, the manuscript of which Schreiner sent to Ellis and he kept until it was published after her death. The books referred to are: Ralph Waldo Emerson (1877) Friendship London: Astolat Press; Ellen Louise Moulton (1878) Poems London: Macmillan & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xvii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 143
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. The start of the letter is now missing. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1[page/s missing]
2
3of your medicine now & after that try to eat something. I am in such a
4dim dream I hardly know what I am doing or writing.
5
6I don’t want to give more than £1 for rooms, but if I could get very
7nice ones for 25/ or 30/ I wouldn’t mind.
8
9I wonder if it would be good for me to stop in London, good for you,
10good for your work, good for your mind. I have a kind of feeling that
11it would not be, & yet I can’t explain why to myself. Can you? I want
12to be good for you, & I think I can be better far away writing to you
13than near you talking & interrupting your life. For me you are very
14good but I feel, I don’t know why that my desire sometimes to see you
15is purely a selfish one.
16
17I am getting sick again & must go to lie down. It is just like board ship.
18
19Your own Olive that would be yours still if she never saw you again
20
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xviii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 9 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 40-1; Rive 1987: 51-2; Draznin 1992: 145-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1Tuesday Evening
2
3I have got all your letters out & sewed them into little books
4according to the time I got them & numbered the little books so I know
5how they came. No one else ever sees them you know I lock them up. I
6was a nice work & I couldn’t do anything else.
7
8I landed in England on the 30th of March 1881. I have looked the date
9up from my books I think it is right. I went to the Crystal Palace
10concerts once or twice in ’82 (in the summer or spring it was that I
11heard the Choral Sym. of Beethovens that seems so splendid to me &
12helped me so, & I think it was the Saturday before that I heard
13unreadable The Italian Symphony. That helped me so too, no music will
14ever seem like that to me I think I was sitting near the back in the
156d seats.
16
17What a wonderful change it would have made in my whole life if I could
18have known you then. Perhaps you were sitting quite close to me. How
19much better & sweeter life is to me now, how much I have to be
20thankful for. It seems to me such a wonderful & sweet thing that you
21should have come into my life.
22
23Good night,
24Olive
25
26I think that medicine has done me much good already I feel that I
27could eat. I have read one of those dear little stories
28
29^Have you read “The Outcasts of Poker Flat” Do!^
30
31^I send you a stupid little child’s story I wrote for my brother’s
32school magazine just at the time I went to hear that music. Every
33thing, even such a little story, shows my then weakness. I think I’m
34getting quite strong now in spirit, this weakness is just from illness
35& want of food being able to eat you know. But I shall always be more
36sympathetic now, to all kinds of human suffering. That’s weakness in
37one way, but a kind of strength too. Only physically I shall never be^
38
39^what I was when I landed in England.^
40
Notation
The book referred to is: Bret Harte (1996 [1869]) Bret Harte's Gold Rush: Outcasts of Poker Flat, the Luck of Roaring Camp, Tennessee's Partner, & Other Favorites New York: Heydey Books. The 'stupid little child's story' is likely to be one of the short allegories originally published in the New College Magazine in 1882. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 10 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 146-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1Wednes-day Morning
2
3I got your letter of Monday & Tuesday. The medicine has done me such
4good, but still I can’t eat without getting sick. I am reduced to
5gruel made with water. This began two days before I left Bole Hill & I
6fancy is it is the effect of that Bole Hill water. I have great pain
7in my stomach when I swallow any thing even water. I am certainly
8better the last two days. I think now I have told you everything about
9my-self, except that I am very weak in the legs & fall about like a
10drunk man. I haven’t eaten a meal since last Saturday week.
11
12I feel as if I would like to be a little child, & somebody put me on a
13clean white nightgown, & put me into bed & pat me till I go to sleep
14to sleep.
15
16I don’t think Highgate will be too far out of town because of going to
17see things or people because I don’t want to go out at all, but I am
18always better the nearer the centre of London I am. I am always quite
19well in Bloomsbury & that part, but it is so noisy. The only part of
20the North of London I ever was in was Belzise Gardens, Belzise Park.
21That seemed nice & quiet & fresh but a long way from a bus.
22
23Don’t look any more for rooms, Henry, just take what comes. You know I
24mayn’t be able to stay long & it is taking all that time up & don’t I
25know what terrible work looking for rooms is! How feet & head get to
26ache at last. And then the North is such a long way for you to go.
27
28I don’t know why my legs are so funny but I am much better. I think
29those little stories of Bret Harte’s are beautiful; that “Blue Grass
30Penelope” as a study of woman equals “Nora” & the marvellous truth of
31that “Lone Star Mountain” to “Digger” life is something the depth &
32genius of which can only be understood by one who knows the life.
33
34I can’t read hard books. It’s funny to realize that the condition of
35one’s own mind in illness is the normal condition of many other minds.
36It makes one feel tender over other blunter natures to feel this. I
37think a great deal of psy-chology can be learnt from watching the
38state of one’s own mind when weakened by illness (or rather from
39remembering what it was afterwards, when one’s ill one can’t watch
40much!). It is nature carrying on experiments with the human soul, as
41it were.
42
43I will talk with you about some mental things connected with memory &
44imagination that I have noticed the last few days, but I’m too tired
45to write more now. I like when you call me your little sister. I wish
46I was your own ^sister,^ but it doesn’t matter.
47
48I take the medicine in half doses because if I was to drink so much it
49would make me sick. I can only take a very little of water or anything
50at a time.
51
52Olive
53
Notation
The books referred to are: Bret Harte (1996 [1869]) Bret Harte's Gold Rush: Outcasts of Poker Flat, the Luck of Roaring Camp, Tennessee's Partner, & Other Favorites New York: Heydey Books; Henrik Ibsen (1882) Nora (later A Doll’s House) (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Giffith, Farran & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xxi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 17 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 148
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1Wednesday Afternoon
2
3I hope you are feeling well, & able to work. You will be glad to know
4I am feeling wonderfully well.
5
6Miss Haddon called this morning & was here two hours. You can’t find
7out if Ellice Hopkins is in town I can you?
8
9Be here on Friday, about three, for going to Mrs. Hinton’s. My pure
10beautiful unselfish brother Good bye
11Olive
12
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-157
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 149
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1My sweet love,
2
3I had been thinking of you all this morning as I lay awake. My Harry,
4my Harry. Come to me tomorrow morning a little but you mustn’t
5trouble to look for rooms. Your Olive puts both her arms round you &
6puts your head close to her & wants you to forgive her that she
7isn’t tender to you
8
9Olive
10
11^Not well but will try to go out & look at some rooms this morning^
12
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2a-xx
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 25 September 1884
Address FromBlackwell, Alfreton, Derbyshire
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 149-50
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner stayed in Alfreton for most of September 1884.
1Thurs-day Morning
2
3I finished that novel last night by half past three. Like the
4underlying idea. That clergyman is just like my brother Theo. ^It’s^
5odd that I got a a long sad letter from him this morning.
6
7I hope your cold isn’t worse, eh? My heart aches for you with that
8pained tender kind of feeling when ever I think of you.
9
10Give my love to Louie. I want to write to her but my head goes round &
11round. Don’t wade through my Bro’s letter unless you find it
12interesting. The reason why he has had to harden himself, I though he
13doesn’t know it, is because a man who vividly & realizingly believes
14in hell & damnation, if he have originally a tender heart must harden
15himself or go mad. He becomes at last like his ideal God. The letter
16is very touching to me.
17
18Mrs. Walters has written begging me to go there tom next week while
19Miss Haycroft is there. Perhaps I shall but only for a couple of days.
20How good & loving everyone is to me. I will talk about the sonnets
21when I see you.
22
23Good bye my sweet boy
24Olive
25
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-i
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 3 October 1884
Address From39 Belgrave Road, St John?s Wood, London
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 151
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
139 Belgrave Rd
2Friday
3
4Isn’t it splendid. I wish we had arranged to go to the Museum today.
5I slept better last night. I hope you are working
6
7Your little sister
8Olive
9
10I have written to Miss Lord. Learn what you can about the Avelings.
11
12Tell Louie I’m glad she’s coming.
13
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-ii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 11 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 153
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Saturday
3
4My Henry,
5
6My chest is bad I can’t write.
7
8I have been reading what you wrote in the journal. My Henry, my other self,
9
10Olive
11
12Tell me all you do & think, I am living with you.
13
14^I am 28.^
15
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-iii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 12 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 41; Draznin 1992: 154
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards from mid October to the end of November 1884.
1Sunday.
2
3I have your letters & “Today”. The doctor says it is not asthma it
4is bronchitis. All I expectorate is mixed with blood. But I am better
5this afternoon.
6
7I will write about the New Life & all the other things soon. I knew I
8was getting ill I can tell when that pain comes.
9
10Chapman has written asking me to let him have my book & saying he will
11pay me very liberally for it. It hurts me so when people talk about my
12work when will I ?believe
13
14I have got a letter & a novel called “Dawn” from a Mr H Rider
15Haggard
. who has read S.A.F. The novel is by himself.
16
17Please work Harry for my part as well as your. I must get well some
18day. Think of that vision I had in St James’s Park.
19
20The Doctor is going to inject morphia into my arm.
21
Notation
This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards from mid October to the end of November 1884. The book referred to is: H. Rider Haggard (1884) Dawn London: Hurst & Blackett. ‘My book’ that Chapman would pay liberally for could refer to ‘New Rush’ or more likely From Man to Man. Schreiner replied to Haggard, with his response back to her (HRC/HavelockEllis/Misc/HRHaggardtoOS/1) as follows:

‘Windham Club
St James’ Square
21. October 1884

Dear Miss Schreiner,

I have to thank you for your letter. I am glad that the book reached you at last, though three months, is rather long even for a publisher, to have taken to forward it.

I never was at the Diamond Fields. I went to S. Africa in 1875 with Sir Henry Buliver, afterwards I went up to the Transvaal with Sir T. Shepstone when he annexed it & stopped some years in Pretoria. Then I came home, married, & went out again for a while but after the Transvaal war I came to the conclusion that I had had enough of S. Africa.

Did you know the ?Schumuhl family at the Fields, one of them married Ms Ford, who now lives in Pretoria? I knew them well. Also did you know a Mrs Salomons? I think those are the only Diamond Field people I know.

Do you ever come to London? If so I should so much like to be allowed to me call upon you & make your fulsome acquaintance. Your book made a great impression upon me. I hope that you are writing another. I have got one coming out at the end of the year It deals a good deal with S. Africa, but I have not got a high opinion of it myself – the book I mean – I have been so hard worked between one thing & another that I have not been able to give the necessary thought & care to it. It has only one merit – it was not so long as ‘Dawn’

With kind regards
believe me
very truly yours
H. Rider Haggard

P.S. If you answer this please address
Ditchingham House
Bungay.’

Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. There is an extract in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-iv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 13 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 41; Draznin 1992: 154-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Monday
3
4I hope you got my letter on Saturday evening.
5
6I am getting better but I think it is the morphia makes me so stupid.
7
8I am going to write such a long letter tomorrow. I keep talking to you
9in my head. There is an eagle on the glass above the mantelpiece, its
10head is twisted quite wrong & one wing is bigger than the other. I
11have been looking at it all these three days. You must wear that old
12black coat you had on the last morning if ^when^ ever I see you again.
13
14The doctor was here examining my chest this morning. I have not been
15able to write to my brother. I am going to. Tomorrow I am going to get
16up & go out & look at the sea. How you would like it when the sun is
17on it. I feel happy when I think of you. You are the first human being
18who has been perfect rest to me.
19
20Olive
21
22^Don’t write except when it rests you I trust you anyhow.^
23
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-vi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 13 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 155
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday Evening
29.30
3
4Just now I have got your letter posted this morning. You have been at
5the hospital all day. London seems such a long way off. How are you?
6It begins to seem as if it were time to see you; I can’t yet teach
7myself to understand that weeks must pass before I see the brown hat &
8that little red neck tie.
9
10I am getting better. The Doctor I have is Penhall. He seems to
11understand my case & does me good. I have never had him before. I am
12going to get up tomorrow. I haven’t read I haven’t sat up since I came
13here, my boxes are all just as you packed them. But this afternoon I
14was much better I wrote to my brother. I will tell you what he says.
15
16How was Miss Jones? I am in such a funny kind of dream, Henry.
17
18As I think this doctor is clever Please As soon as he sounded me he
19said “You have bronchitis now but you have had asthma a great many
20years.” & with out asking many questions he seemed to know just what
21was the matter with me. I shall be glad when I can go & have a walk by
22my old sea. I could see a bit through the window this morning with the
23sunshining on it, it looked so beautiful. I will send you old
24Chapman’s letter to read. Give my love to our Louie. How I would have
25liked to come to Annerly a little; but you know I couldn’t. Now I will
26try to go to sleep. Don’t be one ^tiny^ bit anxious about me. It’s so
27much easier & nicer to be really ill like this, than to be fighting
28against it & trying to keep up. Did you tell Mrs. Hinton why I didn’t
29call. unreadable Good night
30
31Olive
32
33^Tuesday^
34Good morning Harry.
35Are you well? I feel close to you.
36
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-vii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 15 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 158
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark. The final insertion is on the back of the envelope. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday.
2
3Thankyou very much for your letter. I enclose £3.5. for subs-cription
4to London Library & the carriage of things &c. What is the London
5pounds or guineas.
6
7Your letter was a great help to me last night I must have books if I
8haven’t anything else.
9
10I will write to you tonight
11
12Your
13Olive
14
15Tell them to send me 10 Books. Have you got the list we made. I want
16also some reviews too. Contem Fortnightly. Ten will be plenty for me.
17
18^Remember “The Woman question in Europe”^
19
Notation
The book referred to is: Theodore Stanton (1884) The Woman Question in Europe London: Low & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-viii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 15 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 41; Draznin 1992: 158-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards from mid October to the end of November 1884.
1Wednesday Night
2
3Yes, I want to write to our Louie too, but I am so stupid I can’t
4even write to you. Not a nice letter.
5
6Yes, I want to join the “New Life”, I but I hope they don’t mean
7if we form a community that ye we are all to live together. It isn’t
8living together but working together in heart that helps people. ^(I
9mean large bodies of people)^
10
11The first little bit of Mama’s letter is about you; the rest isn’t
12interesting The other letter is from my old friend I’ve told you so
13much about. Fancy the two little fellows going off to catch Bonaparte;
14the one is about six & the other four.
15
16I am so glad about “Ghosts”. When will he take it.
17
18Send me some ^books^ about the woman question, & post social questions,
19ethics, ^from the London Library, & some novels, Mehalah &c.^ I must
20have something that will make me forget. I have Tear up my last letter
21to you tear up everything in which I ever have mentioned the subject
22that lies close to me
23
24I am up today all day.
25
26I am so glad you are well & that I don’t make your heart ache, Henry.
27 It comforts me so to think that. I am looking forward to getting the
28Review
29
30^I feel in such a dream as if I were dead & only seem to be living.^
31
32^Don’t trouble about the “London” if you are busy. In a day or
33two will do. I hope you got the money right this evening. Isn’t it
34splendid to get £6 for one article^
35
36Olive
37
Notation
Ellis's article for which he received ?6 cannot be traced. The reference to Ghosts is: Henrik Ibsen (1881) Ghosts (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Griffith, Farran & Co. The book referred to is: Sabine Baring-Gould (1880) Mehalah: A Story of the Salt Marshes London: Smith, Elder & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-ix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 16 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 160
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday Night
2
3It is such a glorious warm night. My window is open, & the sea is
4making such a noise. I like Miss Haddon’s letter. I ought to write
5to Mrs. Hinton but I can’t.
6
7Please tell me how much extra the combins cost, & what the paper cost.
8I send you an M.S. from a friend in the Cape when you have time glance
9at it & tell me what you think I could do with it. I don’t want to
10disappoint her.
11
12Good night. I wish I had a good likeness of you. What makes people
13
14^love you so.^
15
16^P.S.^
17I have just got the enclose It doesn’t say you mustn’t lend the
18books. It says you mustn’t club for the subscription which is a very
19different thing. I am paying it all myself. You see, if people could
20club about the paying they could be getting all sorts of poor people!
21
Notation
'The enclose' is no longer attached. What the 'M.S. from a friend' was cannot be established. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-x
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 17 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 42; Draznin 1992: 163
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday Night
2
3The parcel came safely this morning. I haven’t tried the combinations
4on yet, but I’m sure they’ll do. I shall always feel troubled when I
5look at them to f remember how selfishly I troubled you about them but
6I wouldn’t have done so if I hadn’t been ill & not at all myself all
7that last time. I am afraid I have just again given you trouble about
8the Library. I feel now that I might read books if they came to me but
9I couldn’t take the trouble of getting them. Can you get me any books
10^(at the London)^ of any kind (English of course) on the subject of
11prostitution? Do you know what the cost of the Blue Book on the Con.
12Diseas^es”^ is? If not very expensive I mean to buy it. I think there is
13a place in Endell St. where they sell them.
14
15How is your article growing? I will send back the Indian Rev on Monday
16& write about it.
17
18How much must I still send you Harry? there are the combinations,
19postage, & paper. Don’t wonder if I don’t write much. Someday I will:
20now I am very tired, that old intense longing for death, & all blank.
21But what is the use of troubling you.
22
23I hope in a few weeks to get to work, & then I shall forget every thing
24
25Are you well? Are you happy? Please tell of me all you can about
26yourself. Don’t love me too much. I died three years ago. What are you
27reading. I have been lying on my bed all day watching the grey sea
28with the faraway ships
29
30Olive
31
Notation
Schreiner refers to the government report or ‘Blue Book’ on the workings of the Contagious Diseases Acts 1864, 1867, 1869. Ellis’s article is Havelock Ellis (1885) ‘The present position of English Criticism’ Time December 1885. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 18 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 42; Draznin 1992: 165-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to a version in Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) The Letters. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat morning
2My other self
3
4I have got up early & am am going to sit out by the sea. I send you a
5letter written to Mama about “Nora”, because it will help to show
6you what kind of person she is & I want you to know her.
7
8Get Carlyles’ Life as our first new book, & read it before I have it.
9 Of course we can share the books you are my family. What other family
10have I got
11
12Olive
13
Notation
For 'Nora', see Henrik Ibsen (1882) Nora (later A Doll’s House) (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Giffith, Farran & Co. The book referred to is: James Froude (1882) Thomas Carlyle London: Longmans, Green & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract appears as part of a different letter and is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 20 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 42; Draznin 1992: 168
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. The final insertion is on the envelope.
1144 Marina
2Monday
3
4Such a glorious bright sunny morning You would like it if you were
5here. Tell them ^to^ address the books here. I gave New College because
6that is my only permanent address.
7
8On Saturday Wilfred came to see me & I walked back to the school with
9him (which is about two miles from this) When I was walking back in
10the dark along the sea wall I the electric lamps were shedding such a
11strange light on the water, & all was so still & wonderful, & such a
12strange longing for you came to me; to have you there, with me. I
13don’t know how it was. I am much better in mind & body, & am going to
14work today. Write a little bit for my brother’s book Give my love to
15Eddee & to our Louie. Write me out a list of all your birthdays on a
16bit of paper
17
18Your own
19Olive
20
21My rooms are so close to the sea that I feel as if I was on board ship.
22 I haven’t seen any human creature since I came here except Wilfred.
23
24^Couldn’t we get the Blue Books at the London?^
25^unreadable^
26
Notation
Schreiner’s ‘Blue Book’ reference is to the government report or ‘Blue Book’ on the workings of the Contagious Diseases Acts 1864, 1867, 1869. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 21 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 42; Draznin 1992: 170-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday night
2
3Yes, it wasn’t really me. But you know I am tired & feel bitter
4sometimes I do fight so hard against the feeling. I shall conquer it now.
5
6I am writing with your little pencil. I like it so. Fancy it reminds
7me more of your than a portrait would.
8
9I have worked this evening I have written off at a pull all I mean to
10write in the remembrances now, & I will copy it & send it you to read
11tomorrow.
12
13I like “Die Stützen Du Gesellscheft” I have almost got half through.
14
15Write to me to just when you need to. I only write to you when I need
16to, but you wouldn’t think it because my letters have nothing in.
17
18It’s no use my joining the New Life till I come up to town is it? I
19hope they have the Blue Books at the London. I feel I could really
20work & think on that subject.
21
22Good night. My brother
23Your little sister.
24Olive
25
26I am having to make myself a bit hard & tough. I should break down
27altogether if I didn’t. It’s not
28
29^because I feel so. Do you understand.^
30
31^Have finished the book. How glorious it is! I must, it must, it must
32be translated. It is as true as Ghosts^
33
Notation
The last insertion is written in ink, while the rest of this letter is in pencil. Schreiner’s ‘Blue Books’ reference is to the government report or ‘Blue Book’ on the workings of the Contagious Diseases Acts 1864 1867, 1869. The ‘glorious book’ is: Henrik Ibsen (1877) Die Stützen Du Gesellscheft Leipzig: P. Reclam (translated as The Pillars of Society New York: Kessinger Reprints). Draznin’s (1992) version of the letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 21 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 42; Draznin 1992: 170-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday night
2
3I won’t write to you unless I can write you real letters. My heart
4is always real to you though. I wish I could tell you every thing in
5my life, everything. I can tell you about my self, but the parts about
6outhe other people I can’t & that makes me sad; it irritates me; if
7I can’t write out of my heart I don’t want to write at all.
8
9I feel happy now & calm I wrote a little last night & tomorrow I am
10going to write all day. I am getting well, & strong, very. I like my
11rooms. My bedroom has a large bow window.
12
13My best way with French will be to get a good French novel & an
14English translation & read them together. I must learn it. I am doing
15French exercises now, but that isn’t the quickest way for me
16
17I’m sorry my books have gone to Eastbourne but I shall get them soon.
18 It will be splendid. I am going to bed now. I wish I could feel as
19well in London as I feel here. Have you got the “Indian Review”?
20
21My sweet friend, good night.
22
23Olive
24
25I got a new photo of St. Johnston to day & his book.
26
27Ach, my darling, I don’t want my letters to sadden you. Ach, Harry,
28my Harry
, myself.
29
30
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 22 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 42-3; Draznin 1992: 172-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday Night
2
3I’ll join the New Life if you’ll tell me what sort of paper I must
4write, would ten lines do? This is the last of my engrossing pens Get
5a box & take as many out as you want & send it me. It will cost – I
6don’t know how much, let me know. I have not got my books yet. I am
7disappointed about “Ghosts.”
8
9I had most terrible asthma last night. The doctor says I must never
10hope to get well gain, relief is all I must look for, from narcotics.
11They don’t affect my brain at all because the asthma eats them up.
12
13I have worked today though, pretty very well
14
15This morning I got another letter from “H” Rider Haggard. Do you
16know - I half believe it is Lady Florence Dixie. I’ll send you the
17letter. I read your letters over generally four times or so.
18
19I have written to Eleanor about the play.
20
21When you come to see me some day I shall send for my box with my old
22papers from Eastbourne, & you shall see them. Yes, I will be much in
23London. You see I have asthma everywhere; it will never leave me again.
24 April & May I think I shall spend in London. Henry, my letters seem
25cold to you. It is because I dare not give way to feeling of any kind.
26If a man has a wild unbroken horse he must keep the bridle on him. You
27are dearer to me than you
28
29^have ever been. You have become part of my life itself.^
30
31Olive
32
33^The blue books are to be had at the London.^
34
35^Is your mother quite well now?^
36
Notation
Schreiner refers to Henrik Ibsen's (1881) Ghosts (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Griffith, Farran & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 24 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 43; Draznin 1992: 176-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday Morning
2
3Fancy, I haven’t got the books yet. Were they sent do you think. My
4brother has been away at Northampton visiting his wife who is visiting
5her relations there, perhaps that’s why it ^they^ haven’t been sent on
6to me. I’ve got the blue book, I sat but a great part of last night
7reading it. It makes my blood boil all through me. It isn’t the C.D.
8acts themselves that make me feel so, I am against them but they are a
9small thing, it is the whole thing – & that damned & damnable “it is
10necessary.” We shall see if it is necessary, if in fifty years hence
11there is such a think as an outcast class of women in England. If it
12is necessary to pull down the whole structure of society to get out
13that stone that lies at the foundation of it, it must be pulled down &
14built up again better.
15
16The combinations fit beautifully. Somehow they are different from
17other combinations to me.
18
19I am working. I will send you Remembrances to-morrow. My chest is bad
20but I can work, & I will, anyway. I’m read a good deal of Madam
21Roland yesterday with the dictionary I carry keep my French grammar by
22my bed side so that as soon as my eyes are open in the morning I can
23begin to work. I am going to work this winter like I used to at the Cape.
24
25I am still troubled about you, wondering if the de time you give to
26medicine is energy diverted from its right course. I can’t feel that
27it is. I have just finished making a tiny Irish stew it is boiling in
28a pot on my fire; the pot is about as big as my fist. I wish you were
29going to taste it I can make such nice Irish stews. Thankyou for
30understanding my letters though they seem not real. I think you can
31trust me, only don’t rest too much on any human being. “Woe unto man
32who hath loved the creature more than the creator, who is blessed
33forever more.” I have heard those words ringing in my ears for months.
34We take the human being & we make it stand for everything to is. “It
35were better for that man that he had not been born.”
36
37Give my love to Louie. I haven’t extenall news to give you. I wil
38haven’t seen any one but Wilfred since I came here, & & read & think &
39look at the sea, & read & think & look at the sea. I’m getting strong
40like I used to ?me be, that feeling of my heart being all iron. Have
41you ever had it? I am not miserable at all. I never cry. Your letters
42are so precious to me.
43
44Olive
45
46^Yes, I should like to see Miss Haddon’s paper, but of course I shan’t
47agree with it.^
48
Notation
The ‘blue book’ Schreiner mentons is the government report or ‘Blue Book’ on the workings of the Contagious Diseases Acts 1864, 1867, 1869. Schreiner’s ‘Remembrances’ are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner’s The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. The book referred to is: Marie-Jeanne Roland (1820) Memoirs Paris. Louie Ellis was also in correspondence with Schreiner; and while none of Schreiner’s letters to Louie survive, three of Louie’s letters to Schreiner are archived with the Ellis materials at HRC. There had been a conversation between the Ellises about one of Schreiner’s manuscripts in October 1884, as the following (HRC/HavelockEllis/Misc/LouieEllistoOS/1) indicates:

'24 Thornsett Road
South Penge Rd
Surrey.
Oct. 24th / 84

My dear Olive,

Thank you so much for your last long letter. Henry seemed amused at you asking my advice about he M.S.S. & thinks (?) you thought you were writing for to him. Hasn’t he already given you him opinion? I like Sunday at the laarger, but the F.A.M.P. best of all. They are interesting to you thro’ knowing the people. They are ditto to me thro’ knowing you, but apart from person–alites there n is a quiet interest about them which makes one want to finish them.

I am thankful you are strong & bright again – the sea air has made mother come home clothed & in her right mind – she went almost straights from her bed.

He you become reconciled to your hat ^& dress^ yet? I have invested in a fascinating red velvet bonnet which goes to a ?peak in front, it has tips & wings & was only 17/-. Henry is just going to make the coco-a for supper – I am glad to hear cooking is among your accomplishments.

I’m tired or would write a longer letter.
With love from
Louie’

Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 25 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 179-80
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat Night
2
3My brother did not come today. I walked back with Wilfred to the ^the^
4Hastings part of the town, & bought him some electric toys, & took him
5in to a confectioners, & then I walked home again in the dark along
6the sea front. I went into a shop on the Colonade to buy some food for
7tomorrow & then I came home, & I finished reading your letter which I
8had got while you I was out. I have such yearing love & tenderness for
9you in my heart today. I will tell you all about my self that you like
10to know when you come The pens & papers have come. Thank you.
11
12Give my love to Louie & tell her I’ve cooked more dinners & made
13more loves bread in my life than she ever will.
14
15I shall make a good member for the “New Life.” I hope Mrs.
16Walter’s
tunes will be of help.
17
18Good night, my boy, Henry. I can’t help thinking it would be nicer
19if you
20
21^were older than I am.^
22
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xvii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 26 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 43; Draznin 1992: 182
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards from mid October to the end of November 1884.
1Sunday Night
2
3I have had such pleasure in Miss Haddon’s article. I think it very
4good, on the whole as good an article as has been written on the
5subject I enclose a note for her which shows what I don’t like. Do
6try to get it published.
7
8How are you Henry? Are there many more of those dots of ours in the
9book. Henry, there is one person does love you, & sympathize with you
10now. Isn’t it funny, my heart feels so tender over your past too;
11but it feels tender over your present too. I get quite a pained
12feeling with tenderness when I think of you some times. Do you
13remember the day when I was ill & Mrs Hinton come to see me, & you
14went away laughing Ach, Harry, my Harry, & that day you put your face
15down on the map.
16
17We had the greatest storm I have ever known in England here last night.
18 I lay awake listening to you it.
19
20This morning I had one of the worst times I ever had. It had been bad
21all night but it came on about eight, in a few minutes I was bathed in
22perspiration it was as ^though^ my clothes had been put in water. I
23thought for the moment I was dying. It is such a wild terrible agony.
24I have been lying down all day not able to work but I will work
25tomorrow. I haven’t been able to copy the Remembrances for you as I
26wanted
27
28I am not taking any medicine now. You see it doesn’t do any good.
29
30Good night, my Henry.
31Olive
32
33Monday Am not able to write the note to Miss Haddon today. Will
34tomorrow
35
Notation
Caroline Haddon's article was published anonymously: Anon (1884) The Future of Marriage London: Foulger. Schreiner's 'Remembrances' are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner's The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xviii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 27 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 43; Draznin 1992: 184
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday Night
2
3My Henry, I came home & found your note, it’s finding your notes
4here makes the place seem like home to me.
5
6I am very bad, Henry. I had great agony in my chest yesterday morning
7& the perspiration is so terrible. In one moment it burst out all over
8me so deadly cold & I feel as if I were dying. Last night in the night
9too I was tearing my clothes off in the agony like long ago. I went
10this afternoon to the Doctor to have the morphia injected. But he said
11when he felt my pulse that he couldn’t do it. & he says I mustn’t
12take anymore of the medicine he gave me (I haven’t been taking it
13for the last three days). I fancy he thinks he has been on the wrong
14tack in giving me what he has. He said it was “a sad case a very sad
15case” & that I must send for him in the night when the fit was at
16its height, but if that’s all he can do what good will he be.
17
18I have such fresh unreadable pain under my left shoulder. & no where
19else, not pain only suffocation. How I have told you all about myself
20haven’t I.
21
22^My sister-in-law is coming home this evening. I expect she & my
23brother are sitting together by the fire in the study now. I can’t
24copy the Remembrances. I will try to tomorrow. It is written but on
25rough odds & ends of paper. I must write to Miss Haddon tonight^
26
27^because I do want her to leave that sentence out.^
28
Notation
Schreiner's 'Remembrances' are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner's The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xixHRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/NFPn
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 28 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 54; Draznin 1992: 186-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is composed of a number of pages, which are now separated in the HRC collections as the result of pre-archiving happenstance. The letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Tuesday Night
3
4I send Remembrances. I’ve not had time to copy it out. Please send it
5back ^soon^ as I shall have to revise it & send it off by the 4th.
6
7The letter you sent me this evening was nice to me, I sat by the
8window reading it.
9
10I don’t think I love you so much when I am alone as when other people
11are about you ^me.^ Then I hunger for you. I wonder why it is?
12
13If that sentence is kept in Miss H–’s article it makes the whole
14article bad. I send you Mrs. Walters letter. She doesn’t like ^much^
15your article, I can see, (the mere fact of you^r^ mentioning Hinton
16would cause that, she has such a horror of his ^actions^ views & disgust
17to his person) & she has set her heart so upon my loving Haycraft. ^She
18would love my boy if she knew him.^ What she says about sexual feeling
19is so absolutely true; & that ^(oddly enough)^ is one of the things I
20wanted to say to Miss H- in my letter last night in very nearly the
21same words.
22
23You don’t mean only to stay a few hours if you come, do you? I can get
24a bedroom for you just behind mine a nice one.
25
26I am better today.
27
28My sister-in-law is coming over to see Wilfred tomorrow. I don’t know
29if she is coming to see me.
30
31Have just got notes from Miss Müller & Miss Lord. Miss Lord seems to
32think it will all be arranged about “Ghosts.” If I were in town I
33should go to see Champion & beg him to publish it. He must.
34
35I am going to work hard at French. I should like to get a good book
36from the library with a translation What What shall I get? It is a
37bright clear night the storm has gone. I cook all my food here.
38
39Olive
40
41^Your sister^
42
43I have opened my letter again just to say something, & now I don’t
44know what to say except that you mustn’t feel alone in the world. One
45other soul is walking with yours. I feel such fear that you might get
46to care for me too much, that explains the kind of quietness I show to
47you. You know Henry you don’t seem to me like another man you seem
48like part of myself How can I keep
49
50^you far from me.^
51
52^Don’t take too much bromide. You mustn’t lower yourself too much with
53it. Tell me about the dots. I am going to set my teeth together & work
54tomorrow come what will.^
55
56Olive
57
Notation
Schreiner's 'Remembrances' are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner's The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. Caroline Haddon's article was published anonymously: Anon (1884) The Future of Marriage London: Foulger. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version has been misdated, omits part of the letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xxHRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/NFPm
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 29 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 43-4; Draznin 1992: 189-90
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards from mid October to the end of November 1884.
1Wednesday Night
2
3Yes, it is true that I want you most when other people are about me.
4This afternoon my sister-in-law was here, & while she was here a Mrs
5Liddiard called I was glad Mrs Liddiard called it made it easier for
6me. But while ^when^ they were gone, oh such a turning of my heart to
7you. I have so much to say to you.^, my comfort.^
8
9I have got your letter. It has helped me. ?Iges Yes, come soon, the
10week after next. We will arrange the time exactly bye & bye. By that
11time I shall be much needing you. It will have been so long since I
12saw you.
13
14Have you got “Remembr^ances.”^ I have had my heart in such agony
15today. The old madness that I thought I had conquered came over me
16again. No Henry, you do help me. More than you know, more than I know
17^fully^ except when at times I see it.
18
19I love I know H R Haggard can’t be Lady F D – because John
20Pursglove
says when he was working one day ^at the Fields^ she came to
21look at his machine But from the first letter & book I made sure it
22must be a woman. I can’t make out what type of man would have
23written such a book. ^Would you like to read it?^
24
25That sentence was not the only thing I wanted to write about to Miss
26Haddon
. Why at the end does she put the matter in such a onesided form.
27 In countries like the Cape where there are two men almost to one
28woman how would a man having two wives make life happier. At In
29Griqualand West, (the Diamond Fields) there has for the last fifteen
30years been a population in which there were about 10. men ol to 1.
31woman . How would ^each^ man having two women have made ^make^ things
32happier for the others? Of the few women living in all those ^Diamond Field^
33towns more than half, or quite one half, are prostitutes. What makes
34them prostitutes? The fact that the men have money & that they have
35none. If you could reverse the position of men & women & give to women
36the power, the wealth, & the work in life that men have; tomorrow you
37would have the selfish & cruel among them hiring men for f money, and
38there would be men prostitutes. as to-day there are women. Nothing but
39a perfect, absolute, & complete equality, can ever make the
40relationship between man and woman pure.
41
42What I think so valuable in Miss Haddon’s article is that it raises
43the question fearlessly. But it is only a side she shows. I am going
44to write an article on prostitution as soon as my book has got on a
45bit. I can’t wait to say what I must say. Can you tell me whether
46venereal disease is known among any savage races. I know it was not
47among Kaffirs till white men came among them. Am I right in supposing
48it first became common in Europe in the 14th or 15th centuries. Or am
49I confusing it with other diseases? That is a side of the question I
50must yet fully study.
51
52W I learn from the C. D. acts ^Blue Book^ that it is a common thing for
53a woman to have union with from 15 20 ^20 to 30^ men in a night, had you
54any idea that such a thing was possible. I had not. Ach God, I must
55write on the question.
56
57I am going to bed now. Henry, are you writing at that little
58Australian story? Do. I want you so to.
59
60Your otherself
61
62^puts her arms round you!^
63
64Henry, you mustn’t feel miserable. I put my arms round you. I get
65your old face against mine.
66
67I will send Miss Jones book. I was so muddled when I went away but I
68thought you said she said I was to keep it till I saw her or something
69like that. I'm sure I didn't want it, I glanced through it in an hour
70the first night & have not looked at it since. Henry
71
72^you mustn’t be miserable!^
73
74Hasn’t your heart ever been like iron? Mine was for five years. Then
75for the three years long years since I first spent in England I cried
76every night for hours.
77
78I must go & lie down now till I am driven up. Good night.
79
80I wanted you this evening again. I am beginning to want you so ?now. [end
81of sheet torn away]
82
Notation
Schreiner's 'Remembrances' are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner's The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. She refers to the government report or 'Blue Book' on the workings of the Contagious Diseases Acts 1864, 1867, 1869. Caroline Haddon's article was published anonymously: Anon (1884) The Future of Marriage London: Foulger. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xxi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 30 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 191-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Thursday
3
4I’ve been out to post your letter. Harry, come, & I’ll make that heart
5glad, that sweet tender heart that longs so for love. Ach Harry.
6
7Afternoon.
8
9I wonder whether our Louie would care to have that blue hat of mine. I
10wanted to give it her that evening only I didn’t like. If you think
11she wouldn’t be offended I’d like to send it her. ^I’ve never worn it^
12but that at the Progressive. It suited her so nicely. I’ll wear it if
13she doesn’t care for it, but my conscience would feel more at ease
14about the 30/ if she had it.
15
16Don’t feel sad my sweet ^heart^ there so far away from me.
17
18I am think
19
20I am going to work a little now. Yes, you are rather supercilious when
21you write articles, even when you dontt don’t mean to be so.
22
23Good bye. unreadable
24Olive
25
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/2b-xxii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 31 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 191-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at three addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday
2
3Please have a likeness taken for Olive.
4
5If Henry comes on Monday week don’t you think that will be nice. His
6little mother will tuck him in & let the firelight dance on the wall
7for him.
8
9O.
10
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-iHRC/CAT/OS/3a-xiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 31 October 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 43-4; Draznin 1992: 194-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is composed of a number of pages, which are now separated in the HRC collections as the result of pre-archiving happenstance. The letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Th Friday Mo Eve.
2
3I have written & thought all day so delightfully. When it was getting
4dark this evening I went out for a walk to buy some sardines &
5bis-cuits for supper. The night wind was bit ^blowing cold as I^ came
6back but so nice & fresh Wh I found your letter in the stand when I
7came in.
8
9You are quite right about men prostitutes. That is just the point I
10noted with interest when reading the Blue Book. No man can endure so
11much physical entercourse as a woman. It would simply be impossible,
12^to the same degree^ & one fourth as much would kill him.
13
14One woman could, from the purely physical standpoint, better satisfy
15six men, than one man could satisfy six women.
16
17My brother who talks much & freely on such subjects to his old boys
18who tell him everything, & who is an authority on such matters, tells
19me that as a rule, a man is completely knocked up when he first
20marries, whereas the woman is never brighter or fresher, than when
21first married
. He says it is a well known thing among men. – But we
22can talk about this when you come.
23
24I do think that in that article in the latter part Miss H– puts it
25too much as if the ideal condition, the condition to be striven after
26was the union of three. There may be certain conditions in which it is
27desirable, just as there are certain morbid conditions when it is
28absolutely necessary that an individual should have nourishment every
29ten minutes; but the natural thing & generally the best is to have
30three hearty meals a day. But there can be no law laid down. The value
31of Miss H’s paper is that it is protest against cut & dried laws. It
32is the spirit that profiteth.
33
34It’s good for me to think & study about the woman question
35especially prostitution, while I’m working at my book. Its the only
36thing that does^n't^ take me always from my work or that I can really
37study at the same time. Of course the subject of my book is
38prostitution & marriage. It is the story of a prostitute & of a
39married woman who loves another man, & whose husband is sensual &
40unfaithful. Don’t be afraid that my mind won’t swing round. When
41I’ve got this book off my soul I shall look round at other sides of
42life. I dares Get me something on the woman question or prostitution ^for
43for the French book if^
44
45^you can. Has Renan written anything on it?^
46
47Send me Babel when you can. It will be so sweet to have you here. I
48shall like if you can show me the article.
49
50Good bye Ellis. (In my mind, I always think of you as Ellis.) It’s
51such a sweet name.
52Olive
53
54I should like to get a good French book of Renan’s to translate.
55Order me one from the library please & I’ll translate it I wrote
56to-day for “Woman question &c as I have only 8 books & you three we
57can have more. I have finished the two prostitution books. The one is
58idiotic, the other not had, but forty years old. The blue book is
59valuable. Find out if they have B.Bs at the London. I’m so glad the
60essay is getting on. All your work is mine, I love it.
61
62Later
63
64Ellis, what wasn’t clear in the “Rem” were words left out or was
65the sense confused? On Monday week you’ll come, & your little sister
66will show you the sea & everything & everything! If you can come early
67Monday morning & stay till Tuesday evening I will wear that horrid hat.
68 I will never spend 30/- on a hat for myself again. I never have
69before. I could of course write
70
71^ever so much for the N.L.^
72
73^but I don’t want to spare the time.^
74
Notation
Caroline Haddon's article was published anonymously: Anon (1884) The Future of Marriage London: Foulger. 'My book' dealing with prostitution and marriage is From Man to Man. The 'blue book' is the government report or 'Blue Book' on the workings of the Contagious Diseases Acts 1864, 1867, 1869. Schreiner's 'Remembrances' are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner's The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/SofLg
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 1 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 44; Draznin 1992: 196-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat night
2
3I have revised & made many little alterations in Remem. Now it is
4ready. How dreadfully it needed, but you know it isn’t meant to be
5carefully written, its just any how.
6
7I like Ben Jonson & Bartholemew Fair. You know the 16th & the 19th cen.
8 have the same spirit in them they answer back to each other in
9everything.
10
11My Ellis, I feel so tender to you tonight. I want to see you. It will
12be a week next Monday. You must not mind my letters seeming cold my
13letters to my mother to Dadda to every one seem so now & my heart is
14so soft
15
16Olive
17
Notation
'Remem' refers to Schreiner's 'Remembrances', which are incomplete and appear in Cronwright-Schreiner's The Life of Olive Schreiner London: Unwin. The reference is to: Ben Jonson (1780) A Descriptive Poem of Bartholemew Fair London: H. Turpin. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/HE/FRAG/NDofW11HRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/NFP
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 199-200
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Dating this text has followed information written on it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at three addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885. The final insertion is written on the back of the paper.
1The principle of equality applies equally to women with ^&^ men.^!^ We
2perceive
^It is evident^ that the imperfect education of women in the
3school & in the world, her economic dependence, her inequality in the
4face of the law, her limited & artificial industrial & professional
5activities have resulted hitherto in an immense injustice, not to
6women alone but also to the race. /We recognize that women are
7entitled to a development as complete & unfettered as men, & that they
8possess the same rights & responsibilities.
9
10^I think it’s very good & condensed. Thanks for Mackay’s letter.^
11
Notation
This text seems to have been produced jointly by Schreiner and Ellis, probably as a projected amendment of part of the constitution of the Fellowship of the New Life, which Ellis had encouraged Schreiner to participate in. All the editing deletions and insertions are in Schreiner's handwriting. Schreiner has also commented in the margin, 'That "with" is bad change that sentence somehow', referring to the first sentence. Draznin's (1992) version of the text is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-ii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 3 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 200
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at three addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday Morning
2
3My friend,
4
5When will I have conquered my heart & subdued it utterly. Not until death
6
7I want your I would be interested to see Miss Jones’s letter, if you
8don’t think she would think it a breach of confidence to show it me.
9If she asks me about my relation ship to you when she is here I shall
10tell her simply that it is no conceivable business of hers, & that I
11look upon her inquiries as an act of impertinence. Give my love to our
12dear old Louie. ^& thank her for her letter.^ Go on with that article
13
14I wish they had medical books at the London. I can’t read books like
15Buckle & Historical ^or^ technical scientific works now. They I take me
16too far away from my work. Medical & psychological study are is merely
17the study of the same thing from two side, & the one pours its light
18upon the other.
19
20Good bye, my Henry, my comfort, my friend.
21Olive
22
23Henry, why is it that when I think of one subject I get this strange
24wild agony at the top of my head? A physical feeling. Nothing else
25gives it me. If it were to get worse at any time I know that that
26would be madness.
27
Notation
The book referred to is: Thomas Buckle (1857) History of Civilization in England London: J.W. Parker & Son. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-vii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 17 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 46-7; Draznin 1992: 200-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday
2
3I am so utterly worn out. No work today Your letter with Miss
4Jones
’s I have just got.
5
6Miss Jones seems, apart from any thing else, to forget that when
7people say they are engaged, or married, they speak simply of an
8external fact. When people are “friends-” does she expect them to
9enter upon an analyze ^analysis^ “I kiss him ^or her^ some times, I love
10some one esls better, but I feel so & so to him,” &c &c. He^r^
11relationship to you may give her a right to know every thing about me.
12Her relationship to me gave her no right to question me as she did the
13first time she saw me^, & so^ I don’t fancy that what you have said to
14her can give her a right to question you either. I know that What are
15you to say?
16
17I think I should like Rodent Noel much. I have read some articles of
18his. Thanks for what he says about S.A.F.
19
20I wish other people would leave us alone Henry, to love eachother as
21we like. It always seems to me that the beauty goes out of friendship
22& everything else when they touch & claw at it.
23
24I don’t want to make you sad; what can I do for my ^own^ boy. I hope
25your head doesn’t feel like mine does, my sweet head that comforts
26me so.
27
28Good bye
29Olive
30
31^I can see you sitting in the parlour & playing I wish I could put my
32head against your knee. It aches as if it were going to burst. If I
33can work I shall forget it.^
34
35Later
36
37If you ^come^ from Charing + it won’t do. You must come from L. Bridge
38or Victoria. & take your ticket for West Marina or they will put you
39down a mile & a half from this. The C + Railway has no station at this
40end of St Leonards. Come as early on Monday as you can, & I will be at
41the station to meet you. Ach, my Henry.
42
43^If you happen to be in ?Bo Gower St. could you look in somewhere & ask
44the price of apartments I want to know if they are very dear there.
45Don’t go on purpose because I shan’t need them for months^
46
47OS
48
Notation
The paragraph starting ‘Later’ is a torn off half sheet of paper, on its back is a short piece of text from From Man to Man, as follows:

‘Rebekah put her can down in wonder.
“I wish I were pretty & clever, & had white hands. I wish I were like anything but what I am! I wish I were you, Rebekah!” She raised her large white’

The speaker here is Rebekah’s sister Bertie. For Roden Noel’s comments on The Story of an African Farm, see Schreiner’s letter to Fred Schreiner, November 1884 (HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xiii). Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version has been misdated, omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-3
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 4 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 44; Rive 1987: 52; Draznin 1992: 203-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. An associated envelope provides the address the letter was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday Evening
2
3I got a letter from you late last night, yet all day I have been
4restless for another It has seemed so long since I heard from you I
5was waiting down the hall for your letter when it came this evening
6
7When I first knew you I thought here is one person into whose
8relationship with me no pain will ever enter because we are so near
9each other & understand eachother so. Now it seems as if I was going
10to make you so sad. Henry, I would rather that If you could see deep
11into my soul you would see that the feeling that is yours is the most
12pure & perfect feeling that I have ever had for anyone, – I mean the
13kind of feeling that can’t go away. If I had passion for you perhaps
14I couldn’t have this feeling (I think it like Montaign felt to his
15friend) & this is something much more rare, & I think higher. It is no
16figure of speech when I say you are my other self You have taken a
17place in my life which no marriage or passionate love of mine could
18ever take from you. My Henry. my boy, my own. “Can a woman forget
19her suckling child that she should not have compassion on the son of
20her womb? Yea, she may forget, yet will not I for-get thee.” For so
21many years I have longed to meet a mind that should understand me,
22that should take away from the lonelyness of my life, now I have found
23it. Sweet one, you will be happy when once you come to me.
24
25^You will feel how you are coming to help satisfy & rejoice another
26human being & that will make you glad. If you come by the S.E. line
27you will have a mile to walk, but that will be better than coming
28later. Good night, my otherself^
29
30Olive
31
32Ellis, that heart mustn’t be heavy. Olive Schreiner’s otherself,
33the friend she has been waiting for so many years mustn’t be sad.
34
35Wednesday Morning^, early.^
36
37I feel so happy this morning Henry, the sun is shining and the doves
38are leaping in the sunshine out side. Oh it must be weather like this
39when you come. I wish you were here now. I wish you were coming to
40stay for a month. I woke up this morning with such a glad feeling that
41it was so nice to live. You know I’ve wanted for so many years to
42die, but I don’t anymore.
43
Notation
Between ‘from’ and ‘lonelyness’ in ‘take away from the lonelyness’ in line 22, there are three lines upside down, crossed out and clearly not part of the letter; these are possibly a discarded try-out sentence in From Man to Man. They are:

“them among the long brown grasses.
The tulip flowers were still shining out yellow, but they had”

The ‘Wednesday morning’ addition to Schreiner’s letter from line 35 on is on a separate torn-off piece of paper. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version is taken from Cronwright-Schreiner. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract includes material from another letter and is also incorrect in various other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-iv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 6 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 207-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Thursday
3
4I wonder if Mrs were Hinton would have any objection to my brother’s
5seeing “The Home” He feels so interested in Hinton. The little bit
6about the nigger child is rather interesting to me. One would like to
7know what kind of woman the mother was. The Mr. Hope mentioned is the
8I man I was so fond of who was married to my cousin.
9
10Evening. Your letter has come I have been lying on the bed reading it.
11You letters are so beautiful so sweet, they make my whole life
12different. They make my days beautiful coming in the evening.
13
14Would Miss Jones mind my ^your^ showing me the letters she wrote you
15when you I first came to London. Now I know why she told me I was a
16savage, or something like that, when I said I didn’t think polygamy
17would answer as a rule. Of course it was quite natural that you should
18tell her that you liked me just as told Mrs. Walters & Mrs. Brown that
19I liked you.
20
21I have been out walking up & down in the starlight on the f seawall.
22There is never a soul on this end of the Marina in the evening.
23Does^n’t^ that rejoice your heart! You are always as afraid of the
24people as I am. Isn’t it funny that the whole of my visit to
25Derbyshire & your visit there & all seems just like a dream to me. I
26cannot realize that it was true, or that I really was there, or that
27such a place as Derbyshire really exists. I think it must be because I
28have now dropped back into the old solitary life I lead for two years,
29& that seems like a dream coming in between.
30
31I hope it will be fine when you are here. We will walk under that arch
32where I used to walk so desolate two years ago. How different the
33world is to me now. Good night sweet boy,
34
35Olive
36
Notation
'The Home' is a reference to James Hinton's unpublished essay 'Thoughts on Home', which Ellis had been lent by Mrs Hinton and later passed on to Schreiner. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-4
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 12 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 210
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. An associated envelope provides the address the letter was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday Night
26.40
3
4Wilfred came this evening now he is gone. You are just getting to
5Anerly now I think. I feel somehow so happy.
6
7I will be able to work very much. I wish I had made my man happier.
8
9But he was a little happy & he made me so happy.
10
11Olive
12
13Later
14
15I feel so quiet & happy. I am going to bed. Only just now when I
16passed the window & looked out at the lamps I wanted you so.
17
18I didn’t pay him for the pens, but never mind.
19
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-v
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 13 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 211-12
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday
2
3I have your lines in the train. Whenever I think how you loved me
4before you went away I feel a little trembling quiver of love in my
5heart for you. I have a new kind of feeling to you from this new visit
6of your.
7
8It doesn’t matter about your not taking care. If people don’t know
9better they must learn better. Ralph Iron got some such nice letters
10this morning from a gentleman in Birmingham & from the British Consul
11at Lamu on the East Cost of Africa. He has been reading S.A.F. in a
12long solitary illness, & he says it has helped him so. I am so glad. I
13will send you his letter. Do you feel better for coming. All your
14visit was so sweet to me
15
16Olive
17
18P.S. I have not got ill but am not very well because there is a thick
19fog on today. I feel sad because my brother Will’s little girl just
20came into the world & then died.
21
22I am very near to you. I shall never be so lonely as I used to be.
23
24Olive
25
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-vi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 15 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 45; Draznin 1992: 214-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at three addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat Night
2
3So tired. Going to bed. Good night, Harry.
4
5Sunday Morning
6
7I got your letter. It’s nice to get one.
8
9I wrote that I was well because I was when I filled that form. You
10don’t think if my chest had been like it is now I would have thought
11of being a nurse. It was because I was so perfectly well in my chest
12at Lilly KIoof that I thought of coming home to nurse.
13
14I don’t think you are not true about Miss Jones. My mistake is that
15I feel as if you couldn’t in any thing be not absolutely true to me.
16I always feel kind of blind absolute trust in a thing when I love it.
17It isn’t quite wise, but I must feel it. You are to some extent
18right in what you say about Goethe. My chest is getting worse & worse
19every day. It is the weather. I have not yet even got out my papers.
20Oh Henry, I would give all the rest of my life if for one year I might
21be able to breathe like other people. Please finish that criti-cism
22article. I want so to see it printed.
23
24Your Olive
25
26I have such great pain in my chest.
27
28Thank you very much for that letter of Louie’s friend. Have you not
29got my Louie’s likeness I have packed out the
30
31^box & every thing & can’t find it or her letter. We were sitting by
32the box you know^
33
Notation
The form Schreiner refers to is her 25 November 1880 application to the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary (see NELM Olive Schreiner: Havelock Ellis 2006.29/2). Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-x
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 16 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 45; Rive 1987: 52-3; Draznin 1992: 217
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to Cronwright-Schreiner’s The Letters. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sunday Night
2
3I feel very sad, very miserable, very dissatisfied with myself this
4evening, Henry. Yes, I think you are right, things which are pure &
5right for you are not for me. I can’t tell you how grand & good you
6seem to me to be.
7
8I have been lying down most of the day. My chest is very painful. It
9isn’t asthma, it isn’t like it used to be this pain under my shoulder
10I feel as if there were a real swelling there, only of course there is
11not. I must try & work tomorrow if it is only for ten minutes.
12
13It was a nice letter from that man on the East Coast, wasn’t it? I’m
14glad my book helped him when he was ill & lonely. I would rather that
15than anything in the wide world
16
17I shall never spend another Autumn or Winter in England If I can’t get
18my book done in time I will borrow the money from my brother & go to
19Madeira or the Cape, & come back to England in the Spring.
20
21Henry, my sweet boy that I love so, that is more help, & unreadable
22comfort to me than anyone else ever was. I feel so tender to you all
23today.
24
25^Later.^
26
27I think I am going to get bronchitis. You know Henry one thing that
28troubles me so is that I see if am to live I must leave England
29^forever.^ y^Y^ou don’t know what that means to me; it is death. I left
30Africa without a tear, my real life is here, & if I leave England if I
31live for fifty years still I am dead. It isn’t only about my brother;
32the one fixed unchanging dream of all my life was to come; to have to
33go back makes all life a blank^,^ nothing left. I was right in an
34African Farm, Henry. A striving & a striving & an ending in nothing.
35Oh God, if I had health would I care what happened or what came. I
36know now that I shall never be well again.
37
38Take care of that sweet old boy that I love so There’s a long,
39beautiful life & much love waiting for my boy somewhere^, far away^ Good
40night, my darling, my sweet boy,
41
42Olive
43
Notation
The book ‘getting done’ is From Man to Man. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-viii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 17 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 219
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Monday night
3
4Chest bad, been lying down all day. Pain under shoulder gets worse.
5Haven’t written one line for eleven days now.
6
7You must work for your little sister’s part
8
9Olive
10
11My brother Will has been elected to a fellowship at Cambridge.
12
13Olive
14
15Thank you for the plays and MS. Don’t order any more more plays for
16me from the
17
18^Library if you haven’t been yet.^
19
20^I only care for philosophy & social questions & poetry now.^
21
22I want to say good night to you again. I wish you would send me a
23little bit of your hair to keep me company.
24
Notation
The 'MS.' which Ellis sent cannot be established. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xxi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date18 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 45-6; Draznin 1992: 219-20
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885. The beginning and end of the letter are now missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3I don’t know what her relationship to Frank was. I know that Ettie was
4in my mind when I drew her, & Ellie’s love to Theo. Not the woman of
5tallent the eloquent lecturer, but my soft hearted sister Ettie who
6used to stroke my hair. I had quite forgotten that there was such a
7character in the book.
8
9I’ve never looked at it you know since I wrote it. It’s not finished
10either, I left off in the middle of the last chapter, & tore up the
11half I had written I ought to have burnt it long ago, but the
12biographical element in it made me soft to it.
13
14[page/s missing]
15
Notation
A version of the letter appears in Draznin (1992). In Cronwright-Schreiner?s (1924) version, a preceding line is inserted: 'I quite forgot the part about Aunt Margaret'. Aunt Margaret is a character in Undine; Frank is a minor character in Undine (as well as this being the name of a major character in From Man to Man).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 19 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 45; Rive 1987: 53-4; Draznin 1992: 221-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday Eve
2
3This afternoon my sister-in-law was here.
4
5Thank I got your letter just after she was gone. Thank you. Some how
6that bit of your hair seemed to be helping me.
7
8I cannot explain to you how I feel because I do not understand myself
9Do you know that all my life since I came to England is a mystery to
10me. In all my life before (except at rare times with regard to my love
11for Theo & Ettie) my keen analytical intellect stood by watching &
12know^ing^ what went on; since I have been in England I have never
13thought of myself. I have only lived & felt. I think it has been
14because I dared not analyze. It is only in the last three months that
15I have begun to understand how it was that things were as they were.
16– a little.
17
18I love you so, & I yet when I kiss you or come near to you, I have a
19feeling that I am cruel & not quite true to you & such agony – why I
20don’t I can’t understand it. What I can’t understand is that
21fearful agony I had after I said good bye to you in London the first
22time. I never feel quite like that now. I don’t know, Henry. I
23don’t know!
24
25I can’t go out to Elijah. I am sorry: it is tonight. I can’t go to
26Hastings because rooms facing the sea are too expensive
27
28I have worked to-day I can breathe without so much pain. My head says
29it is time to go to bed. I have my bath now at night instead of in the
30morning. It is so soothing I feel as if you were part of my body. Then
31why do I feel as if to kiss you were wrong?
32
33They sent me
34Webster, (1
35Beaumont (1
36Mehalah (1
37Swinburne
38on C.B. 1
39(that devil of a Swinburne) & English Litera.e Far from th. 1 & a vol
40of Balzac not Cousin Pons. I’m not going to try & read it, it’s
41too hard.
42
43Good night. I seem to grow nearer & nearer to you – & one I day
44you’ll melt in to thin air & pass through my hands. No Henry you
45never will
46
47Olive
48
49I never show your real letters to anyone. I showed ^sent^ my brother one
50of yours about Hinton &c. He wrote back such a sweet letter, asking if
51I thought you would quite like it for me to show him any of your
52letters. It’s such a grand old nature with
53
54^something of my father’s childish simplicity. Fancy, I know you
55would love him too.^
56
Notation
Balzac's Cousin Pons was first translated by Schreiner's friend Philip Kent; see Honore de Balzac (1894) Cousin Pons (trans. Philip Kent) London: F. Warne & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date21 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 46, 46; Draznin 1992: 223-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885. The start of the letter is missing. The final insertion is written on the back of the envelope.
1[page/s missing]
2
3when I was ill. These things are somewhat sore to me. I have supported
4myself ever since I was a child. It is not easy now for the first time
5to stand as a beggar. If I went to Africa of course I should take a
6situation as teacher & go back to my old life.
7
8I was very well, in my chest, the first five months I was in England.
9It was as soon as I went to Endle Street that my chest got bad.
10
11Cousin Pons is at the end of that vol. I have read any French the last
12day or two. Isn’t Taine splendid. He’s so true. I have been looking
13all through the last vol & I have not yet found one word that does not
14appear to me true. The work seems to me a work of genius as much as
15any novel or poem could be. His remarks on Dickens are simply the
16perfection of criticism.
17
18I am not adding to the my book. I grows smaller & smaller. I am sure
19that all I am doing is improvement. Condens, condense, condense.
20
21But it’s the most mentally wearing work. To cut out these few parts
22has cost me mentally more than to write the whole. When I am doing I
23do not alter much. I generally write things off best at first; the
24passionate parts, & leading scenes I never need to touch but the
25little bits between where there is not such intense feeling to guide
26one have to be thought over. I do not remember Undine at all. I think
27that Frank was Undine’s stepbrother so no relation to Aunt Margaret at
28all, perhaps I meant to make out that he was her nephew & that she
29couldn’t marry him. I am unwell. Perhaps I shall be better now. I want
30you so close close to me that I can talk nicely to you. Yes, I shall
31always wish we had been able to go to Eastbourne.
32
33I wonder how you feel this evening, just what you are doing. I don’t
34like you to have such a singing in your ears. Perhaps you are wanting
35a letter from me & I couldn’t send one. When it begins to be time for
36your letters to come I just get restless & walk about the room.
37
38Have you heard from Miss Jones when she is coming down?
39
40Aco Good bye. my other-self. Please don’t reel far from me; not in
41soul spirit or body. I have such a need of you.
42Olive
43
44I have read that book; think the poems good. Will send it when I can
45get out.
46
47^Tain’s “English Literature” is splendid!^
48
Notation
'Condensing' refers to the manuscript of From Man to Man. Balzac's Cousin Pons was first translated by Schreiner's friend Philip Kent; see Honore de Balzac (1894) Cousin Pons (trans. Philip Kent) London: F. Warne & Co. The book referred to is: Hippolyte Taine (1871) History of English Literature Edinburgh: Edmonson & Douglas. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 22 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 54-5; Draznin 1992: 226
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Sat. Night
3
4My baby, my baby is ill! I want to take care of it I want to love its
5head & put it to rest and tell it such nice little stories. X ^(You
6know my nice little stories ^^that I tell myself.)^^^ I don't think it’s
7over brain work. I think it’s being not quite happy & having a bad
8cold too. Ach, I must make my baby better.
9
10I am wanted him so last night. Fancy I cried about you I haven’t
11cried before since you went. Perhaps it’s because you were needing
12to be comforted
13
14Mrs. Walters came to see me today. Wasn’t it good of her she only
15could stay from twelve to five. She says that Miss Müller when ^has^
16asked her to ask me to tell you how much she liked your article in
17Today. & to tell she you how glad she would be to see you at her At
18Home’s on Friday afternoon. Her address is 58 Cadogan Place, if ever
19you want to go. If I came to town we can go together. The people one
20meets there are literary people sometimes, but more often political
21folk, & people interest in the woman question, not mere society people,
22 so it might be nice. Couldn’t we have had a splendid winter is I
23had been in London?
24
25My baby how are you tonight, my sweet baby. I’ve talked so much
26about you today. My boy must feel rested that he can get that singing
27out of his ears.
28
29I am going to work tomorrow.
30
31You know I’m so glad Miss Müller liked your article you don’t I
32know how glad, I want you to write more for To-day. If your name gets
33well ^known^ there then the other reviews will take your article always.
34
35Please rest your head a little bit now. I did feel so tender to you
36last night.
37
38Olive. (My Baby)
39
40^I shall like to see Mrs. Hinton.^
41
Notation
The Ellis article referred to is: Havelock Ellis (1884) 'Book review of Die Frau' To-day October 1884. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 23 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 46; Draznin 1992: 227
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Sunday Afternoon
3
4How is my boy? Miss Jones has just been to see me. My heart aches with
5pity for her. I don’t know what kind of sorrowful feeling I get for
6her, poor little woman, So heavily weighted. My chest gets steadily
7worse as soon as I am able to go out I will go & look for apartments
8in Hastings or St Leonards. It I wait much longer it may be of no use;
9I suddenly seemed to see that last night. My letter came to me this
10morning. I have been lying down all day sometimes reading & some times
11sleeping. I have read Webster. The plays I have are “Westward Hoe.
12” Northward Hoe & ‘Sir Thomas Wyat’ After Marlow & Shakespear
13they are the best I have read. What a gulf lies between them & those
14Queen Ann & Stuart fellows.
15
16Mehaliah is powerful. But they ought’t to have died at the end, they
17ought to have lived
18
19Olive
20
Notation
The titles Schreiner mentions are plays by Webster. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 24 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 46-7; Draznin 1992: 227-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1144 Marina
2Monday Morning
3
4Am just going out to look for rooms. Bitterly cold! Have worked well
5all day the morning. I’m going to get hard & strong like I used to
6be. I’m not going to let feeling kill me, damned if I shall, you
7mustn’t expect me to talk soft, but down in my heart I’ll be.
8
9How is my boy? How should I live without that boy.
10
11Olive
12
13Evening
14
15Couldn’t get rooms. Shall never have rest or mental or physical
16health while I am dependent on any other human creature ought to be.
17It is death to all the manly side of our soul. Take all from perfect
18love, but from nothing else
19
20I have worked again a bit. Yes, I walk whenever I work, but my chest
21won’t let me no anything but walk, it eases it.
22
23Your letter this evening is sweet. In heart we are always one.
24
25Olive
26
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xvii-a
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 25 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 228-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards at different addresses from mid October 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday Night
2
3Your letter was sweet to me this evening. I went to try & get rooms at
4at Hastings to-day. Have not yet found any. Will perhaps go to a
5boardinghouse if they will come down in their price
6
7I W will be better when the Spring comes, my darling. Don’t feel so
8anxious about me. I feel I don’t think you lead quite the right kind
9of life, that is why brain work tells on you like it does on me now,
10but no, it isn’t the brain work that tells on me, it’s just the
11one thing that strengthens me. But I wish you & I were in a country
12where there was sunshine & could tear about on wild horses for an hour
13or two every day. We would both soon be well then & able to work eh? I
14would make you like it.
15
16I spit a little blood today. Do you ever have that light kind of
17feeling as if you hadn’t my body I have it this evening.
18
19^I am going to take my bath now before I go to bed. Good night my
20comrade. Olive.^
21
22^Isn’t that a nice little passage in Far from the Mad. about
23comrade-ship^
24
Notation
'Far from the Mad' is a reference to: Thomas Hardy (1875) Far From the Madding Crowd London: Smith, Elder & Co. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xvii-b
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 26 November 1884
Address From144 Marina, St Leonards, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 47, 47; Draznin 1992: 229-30
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident in St Leonards from mid October to the end of November 1884.
1Wednesday
2
3Have not been able to post today, comrade. Please find out for me
4whether the picture of the horned beetle is in Darwin’s “Des-¬cent of
5man” or in “Variations of Plants &c.” I make Rebekah say in Descent of
6Man.” I am working. I am a little better this evening.
7
8Olive
9
10I am going to work.
11
12Harry I must feel very near to you because I think I wouldn’t mind
13taking anything from you. I wouldn’t mind taking anything from my Dadda
14
15^if he wasn’t married.^
16
17Thursday night.
18
19I am going to try & get rooms at Hastings tomorrow, & will will pay up
20the next week here & leave at once. I am going to Hastings for a week
21& if I don’t get better there I will ask my Brother for money & go to
22Switzerland or Italy.
23
24I thought I was going to die this morning the suffocation got so bad,
25but of course it was only fancy Mrs. Cobb called this afternoon. I
26like her much. She is like what poor Miss Jones might have been under
27happier circumstances Poor Miss Jones. I haven’t been able to go see her.
28
29^her. I’m your little sister. Olive.^
30
31^Are you able to work my darling? Are you strong?^
32
33^Yes, all that part of Undine is exactly autobiography Old Rob did
34leave his slipper. It is all true, but it isn’t art, any more than a
35diary is. Do I make a little feather go up & down on the water like
36then really was when I read Julius Gau’s letter.^
37
Notation
Rebekah is a character in From Man to Man. The books referred to are: Charles Darwin (1868) Variations of Animals and Plants London: John Murray; (1871) Descent of Man London: John Murray. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract contains material from different letters, and is also incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xviii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 28 November 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 232-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Alexandra House
2Denmark Place
3Hastings
4Friday Night
5
6Here I am Harry. It is so sweet to write to you. Do you get that kind
7of agony of loneliness on you the first night in a strange place ever?
8I feel like that first night at Aspley Guise.
9
10I wonder how you are & what you are doing, Harry, just at this moment.
11I want to know all about ^you,^ it makes me feel nearer. You must tell
12me little things about you
13
14I had to pay the landlady for my next week at 144 as I didn’t give
15notice. The landlady here is a very sharp unpleasant woman. There are
16about 7 old maids boarding here. I didn’t go down to dinner this
17evening because I felt I couldn’t eat. I have a nice room on the
18third floor. One drawback if I stay here is that if you came to see me
19we should have no place to go & talk in. We couldn’t go to each
20other’s rooms & all the old maids are in the parlour. I went to see
21Miss Jones. Ach what a sad poor little life it is. She wants to see
22Mrs Cobb & I want to arrange so that she meets her Mrs Cobb liv stays
23close to this.
24
25Henry, my Henry, what wouldn’t I give just to see you. I will try to
26work. Oh Henry, my heart is just like ice tonight & I am so lonely. Do
27you think I will get better here? I feel as if I wouldn’t as if the
28air was just the same, now I am here.
29
30I am going to get into my bed now. Wouldn’t it be nice if we could
31see eachother once a fortnight I do miss my letter. I left before it
32came I do left an envelope addressed for them to send it in. Ach, but
33it’s better to be myself than to be poor little Miss Jones isn’t
34it? I feel so sorry for her. I’m sorry for all people that are alone
35& are weak in body like she is.
36
37Good bye, my own sweet boy. Ach Henry I do want you so.
38
39Good night. I want your likeness, a nice one that shall be like you.
40Are there more dots. Ach Henry why I want you so much why am I so weak
41tonight?
42
43Good bye.
44Olive
45
46It’s so nice to address an envelope to you & know you’ll have it
47by this time tomorrow evening.
48
49You must know this part of Hastings very well. It is close to the
50Memorial & the Queen’s Hotel. It is close to the sea. & the sea
51washes up against it at high tide.
52
53Olive
54
55I have found my Louie’s likeness & letter, in my journal
56
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 29 November 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 234
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat. Morn.
212.30
3
4I haven’t got a letter from my boy yet. I will get it this evening.
5
6I wish I had stayed at Marina. I am worse today. But perhaps I will
7get better by & by.
8
9I am writing with your pencil Olive
10
11Sometimes the expectoration is streaked with blood, generally it is
12white with black streaks in it. The pain under the shoulder get more &
13more. I can’t sit upright & I can’t lie down. I wonder if it is
14
15^asthma or what.^
16
17^Tell me little things that I may forget.^
18
19
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-xx
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 November 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 47; Rive 1987: 55; Draznin 1992: 234-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Oh Henry my darling, my darling. I am getting worse & worse I can’t
2get better. Oh Henry what would I do without you, the thought of you
3is all that helps me in this agony & loneliness Where shall I go what
4shall I do? If I had only gone to Switzerland or Madiera when I left
5London. I was still strong then
6
7Later I have got your letter of Thursday & the two books. Thankyou. I
8can’t write for the New Life. I will the first thing when I can. I
9have read your letter agreat many times. I thought my eyes were so
10swollen with crying that I couldn’t see, but I could see that.
11
12Of course I wouldn’t mind taking anything from you. I’m not clear as
13to where you begin & I end. There is only one person who is kind to me,
14 it is the housemaid I seem to cling to her so. I am always looking
15forward to the time she will come up though she doesn’t say anything.
16
17I never spit pure mouthfuls of blood it is mixed with the
18expectoration like the black is. I have got to day ^“Powels^ Balsam of
19Aniseed.” I spend about £1. in medicine.
20
21Tell me if you think of anything good to try. If I were to go to the
22Hydropath. Establishment & take baths do you think I would perhaps get
23well? I wish some one would think for me, & tell me what to do.
24
25I wish there were paying Hospitals to which people could go. Real
26paying hospitals to which people could go paying £1. or ^£^2. or ^£^3. a
27week. They might save hundreds of valuable lives. Not private, public,
28so that there was no cheating & trying to wring money out of you like
29in private houses Such an agony comes over one thinks of becoming a
30real invalid & having no where to go. If I could only have written my
31book first so that I could have got a little money, you & I might have
32gone together to Italy.
33
34This is Sat night
35
36Olive
37
38I have a warm bath at half past nine every evening. Then I get into
39bed, then soon the suffocation comes on. It is worse worst from when
40ever I try to lie down. But do you know Harry never since I left
41Fitzroy St have I been able to lie down & rest. I tell you all this
42because you like to know the little things. Good night, my boy. If you
43were here I would kiss your ears that they mightn’t have that singing.
44
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date30 November 1884
Address FromHastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 47; Draznin 1992: 236
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Hastings
2
3I have the books, did I tell you; thank Louie for Browning. I am going
4to try & get back to Edinburgh ^Hotel^ if they will take me. I have just
5taken some of the quinine you sent me in Derbyshire I feel very
6desolate Henry. You are always in my thoughts, ^& close in my heart,^
7but some how we seem ?so in body as if we should never be able to be
8near eachother again to comfort & help eachother. Yes, you must let me
9see every thing you write when it is printed, like I let you see
10Undine & all the stupid things I write. I wonder if I will ever write
11again – Yes, I will.
12
13Good bye Henry
14Olive
15
16^Oh, to see you, to hear your voice. It is such a horrible woman who
17keeps this house. I am gett^
18
19Olive
20
Notation
Which of Robert Browning's volumes of poems Schreiner was referring to cannot be established. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-i
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 1 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 48; Rive 1987: 55; Draznin 1992: 237
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday
2
3Thankyou for your sweet letter I have told my brother just how I am.
4He doesn’t want to come You mustn’t ask him my darling. If he
5would come & see me & be a little tender to me then I think I would
6live & get well again. But it would be harder to see him if he
7wasn’t
8
9Harry you know I am really dead, I only seem to be alive. You have
10made me live a little. I am so grateful to you. Our love has been such
11a beautiful pure thing, Henry. I feel it so now.
12
13Are there any more dots, my treasure. Take care of your self. Ach,
14Henry one day I shall get well & we will work together in heart & be
15the strength of eachothers lives as we are now.
16
17Don’t be too anxious about me my darling boy. What selfish selfish
18letters I write him. But he likes it so. Other self if I could only
19get to a warm place I should soon be well. I shall be well in the
20spring & go to the Progressive with you.
21
22Olive
23
24You must think my brother isn’t kind to me you don’t know how much
25he has borne for me.
26
27My other self, oh I would like to put my head upon your arm & rest by you.
28
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/1b-xvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 2 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 238
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. Dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has treated it as enclosure sub-set with Schreiner's letter to Ellis of Wednesday 3 December 1884, which appears separately here. An associated envelope provides the address the letter was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday
2
3I am taking Powel’s Balsam of Aniseed. I am certainly better, I
4slept nearly all night. I don’t like to hope too soon but I think it
5is. ^better^ It funny that yesterday came suddenly to me such a longing
6to see Louie. Such a wish that she could come come & spend some days
7with me. I am going out today to try & get rooms. If I can, it would
8be so delightful if she could come, & spend a few days with me. I want
9some one to love me. Oh, I want that more than anything. I think if my
10heart were right my body would get right.
11
12^You can’t think what a comfort it is to me to think that Mrs Cobb is
13in Hastings though I don’t see her. My thoughts keep turning to that
14woman just because she is some living thing that I like I’m not
15going to die young Henry. I’m going to get well & work only you
16mustn’t wonder if I’m not well till^
17
18^Spring.^
19
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-ii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 2 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 55-6; Draznin 1992: 238-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday Night
2
3How sweet to write to you. Thankyou for your letter. Henry, do you
4know, it seems as if I had been weeks & weeks in this house. I am
5better. I think the cough & the expectoration both, now I am onlyy so
6weak. My mind has never felt like it does now except that week in
7Norwood. If it were not for you I would kill myself. If I get into
8apartments will you or my Louie come & spend a few days with me, even
9if I am better, because my mind longs so for love. Don’t you despise
10me & think me very weak? I never used to be so.
11
12I have never been in such a bad boarding house as this, they don’t
13have any food hardly, & they are such dreadful unreadable people I
14can’t stay here & I don’t know where I shall get apartments. All
15our money for going to Paris is used up now. Henry, I think I shall go
16mad if I keep on
17
18^It would be no use coming here because I couldn’t put my arms round
19you & we couldn’t talk, but when I am in rooms you will come, even
20if I am better?^
21
22Olive
23
24^Wednesday morning.^
25
26I am a little better. I have slept lying down well. I got a note from
27my brother this morning.
28
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-iii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 3 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 48; Draznin 1992: 240-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday Night
2
3Still rain & mist What is my boy doing this evening. I am so anxious
4about that criticism article. I fear they will not take it, though it
5is probably better than anything they have taken in the fortnightly in
6the last year. I did a little work again today, Ellis!
7
8Mrs. Cobb came to see me oh it seemed so nice to see a face that was
9kindly & intelligent. If possible to get out I am going to look for
10rooms tomorrow, & I shall get so strong like I was at Fitzroy St & I
11shall do everything.
12
13Don’t be a bit troubled about me. I am taking quinine four times a
14day – your quinine, I’ve got a lot of it still.
15
16I don’t have breakfast in the morning I get up about half past nine,
17as the early morning is the time I can rest in. I go walk up & down my
18room & lik lie down & try to read till one, then I go down to lunch
19with the terrible old women, it makes my heart sorry to see them, poor
20sad bitter old souls
21
22I have just got a letter from Miss Harrison about Montreux. I think I
23shall have to go there the week after next. My heart gets cold when
24
25^I think of leaving England, like ice. When I am coming back to England
26with my book all written then you will come to Paris to meet me & we
27will have our week.^
28
29Living alone like this I am half mad now. I have only heard from my
30brother once in the last fortnight ^ten days.^ Henry I sh
31
32That was Mrs. Walters. Perhaps you will like to see what Mrs. Brown
33says of you. Oh perhaps if Louie were here she would put her arms
34round me & lie in my bed with me, perhaps you would if you were here.
35I don’t want anything but just to feel that I am loved by someone.
36Harry, fancy I’m frightened of the woman who keeps this house,
37I’ve no courage left. I want to die so much Harry. I’ll never be
38like I used to be at the Cape again never be worth anything.
39
40You won’t let me go out of your heart because I go out of England?
41
42Olive
43
44Your Olive
45
Notation
For Ellis's criticism article see: Havelock Ellis (1885) 'The Present Position of English Criticism' Time December 1885. The letter here follows its archival presence and differs from Draznin's (1992) version. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) short extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-iv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 4 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 48-9; Rive 1987: 56-7; Draznin 1992: 243-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday Night
2
3Harry, I am fell feeling so much better this evening. I’ve worked a
4little. I slept well last night after about one o’clock till then I
5was in such agony thinking there was no Hereafter, that there wasn’t a
6time when you & I & Louie & my Brother & all of us will know &
7understand each other; that death will be the end of all this loving.
8How easily one understand how men invented heaven –
9
10“Where the the blighted life reblooms,
11Where the broken heart the freshness
12Of its bouyant youth resumes.”
13
14You letter came to me about an hour ago. Oh yes, ^Harry,^ you are part
15of me. I kept fancying last night how you will die at last. You know,
16my horror is (I don’t think it but I feel it!) – that, we won’t
17perhaps turn to nothing, that through all eternity we shall be
18wandering in the dark, & trying to find eachother again, never come
19across each other in infinite space. Forever, & forever to be alone,
20with a sick yearing in your heart for those you loved & never to find
21them. I don’t nurse these thoughts – they flash on me when I try to
22read & think.
23
24If I go to Montreux I shall pass through London, & we shall see
25eachothers faces for a few moments: but each has the other in the
26heart.
27
28Olive
29
30Later.
31
32I don’t expectorate nearly so much now. I was out walking a long time,
33today: I can not make up my mind whether it is better for me to stay
34here or to go. What do you think? It would weigh heavily if you could
35come & stay with me here say for a week at Xmas, but I cannot rooms, &
36in this house we could never be together.
37
38I am writing such a funny that is to say singular scene, I don’t know
39how it came into my head, where Veronica goes to look at John F a
40man’s clothes. It is ^in^ the place of a whole condensed chapter. I must work;
41 we must have money; just a little.
42
43I can’t have so many dots. How is it. Take iron. It seems to me as
44though cold sponging would strengthen you so. I sponge all the upper
45part of my body with ice cold water every morning & it strengthens me.
46
47I feel such horror of all the people in this house. I don’t think it
48is a morbid feeling. You would have it more strongly than I if you
49were here. Good night. I feel you close to me. I won’t think about
50your dying tonight.
51
52Olive
53
Notation
Schreiner’s quotation is from an H. Bonar poem called ‘The Meeting Place’. The scene involving Veronica she refers to is in From Man to Man. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-v
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 5 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 244
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. TThis letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday night
2
3I am just going to bed. I feel my self excited when I think of our
4criticism article going to the Fortnightly. I hope you are up to your
5own mark. Give your thoughts up as much as you can to that little
6little Australian thing. Miss Jones came here this morning, this
7afternoon I went to see Mrs Cobb. I like her, but she isn’t equal to
8Mrs Walters. No woman is.
9
10Harry, I am beginning to breathe so easily. I think Hastings is much
11better than St. Leonards. I am not sure about Montreux. If I can get
12well here I won’t go. To-day out side the air was warm like summer.
13I can lie down quuite flat. Oh, I am so thankful to be better. Has
14Powell’s Balsam of Aniseed got Laudnum in it. It sends me to sleep
15as soon as I take it & yet doesn’t make my head ache. I will send
16back that book & the other. I was very interested in the nervous
17diseases. I am going to work tomorrow hard.
18
19Good night, my comrade. You are so near to me when I lie awake in the
20night. But some how I can’t see your
21
22^face clearly. It seems so misty to me^
23
24Olive
25
Notation
The 'Australian thing' is Ellis's projected book, (1922) Kanga Creek Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerell Press. Ellis's criticism article is: Havelock Ellis (1885) 'The Present Position of English Criticism' Time December 1885. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-vi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 6 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 49; Rive 1987: 57; Draznin 1992: 247
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat Night
2
3Worked this evening. It is eleven o’clock now I am going to have my
4bath. It is true about that self dosing. Generally I feel as ^you feel^
5But as soon as my body gets weak, so that the old original nature
6comes up the strong individuality then my whole soul cries out not
7“from infinite” not “from God to God.” I don’t want to die, I don’t,
8want anything I love to die, nothing must lose its individuality.
9
10I woke up last night shouting & crying. I thought Fred was going to
11turn into nothing. It isn’t only that I’m weak. I always get into this
12state when I live utterly alone in England & see only the sea roaring
13out of
14
15^my window.^
16
17I am working pretty well. If I keep on getting better I shall not go
18to Montreux You know this house is right up to the sea, the waves wash
19against the door step. It is such a wonderful sight in the middle of
20the night where there is a storm & a pale moon shining
21
22I am glad you feel well. Do you still ever have that singing in your ears?
23
24Harry I was thinking last night about that little boy who went round
25the Cape & felt so cold. Send me some of his likenesses to look at.
26I’ll send them back
27
28Olive
29
30Poor little boy, Harry!
31
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-vii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 7 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 248-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sunday Night
2
3It has been a glorious warm sunny day. I got up to the top of the hill!
4 Perhaps some day you will walk there too. Mrs. Cobb came to see me
5this afternoon again. Harry, she’s a splendid woman. She has such a
6very nice sister also. I shall like to see more of her when I come to
7London. I shall come some day.
8
9Yes this is much better than the Marina, now I am getting better. I
10seem first to realize how bad I’ve been.
11
12I think you ought to work at that little Australian thing. Yes,
13that’s a funny bit about Veronica I don’t know if it’s very bad
14or very good. I am getting into bed now. If I keep on like this why
15should I go to Montreux.
16
17Olive
18
Notation
The comment about Veronica refers to From Man to Man. The 'little Australian thing' is Ellis's projected book, (1922) Kanga Creek Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerell Press. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-viii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 8 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 49; Draznin 1992: 249
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Alexandra House
2Hastings
3Monday
4
5I like that little boy. What a big forehead he had. It isn’t so big
6now in proportion is it? Dear little boy. I want that Idyll to get on.
7I am working too. But my story gets smaller, & smaller, & smaller. I
8can’t help myself I’m driven on to make it smaller. I could have
9written three new works in this time, but never mind, when once it’s
10done shan’t I work. The last part of the book doesn’t need any
11condensing or much touching. It’s that abominable Veronica & John
12Ferdinand give me all this work
13
14I don’t think I’ll go to Montreux. I’m not reading anything, am going
15to send up for more books. Send me the names of any you have thought
16of please. I love you I don’t cry any more. Perhaps you & I will go to
17Paris together in June, & there I will go on, & spend the autumn &
18winter in the “Engadine” (Is that the right spelling?) They is there
19the air is so pure.
20
21I am feeling very dissatisfied with my work, but the last part is good
22I know. The question is whether any body ever gets throught the first.
23
24Give my love to Louie. I am going to send the little boy back tomorrow.
25
26Olive
27
28^Tell Miss Haddon when you write, that I am so glad to have met Mrs.
29Cobb
. I don’t when I have liked anyone so much. Let me know if Mrs.
30Hinton is coming down. I pressed my feet yesterday. I am getting
31strong & well. Olive.^
32
33^I have not talked of you to Miss Jones though she is always trying to
34get me to do so. She seems to have a peculiar dislike to my book & to
35all that I write or do. She must have liked that fine horse! article!!^
36
Notation
The book ‘getting smaller’ and the comment about Veronica and John Ferdinand both refer to From Man to Man. ‘That fine horse article’ cannot be established, but could be Ellis’s article on criticism: Havelock Ellis (1885) ‘The Present Position of English Criticism’ Time December 1885. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-ix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 10 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 49, 50; Rive 1987: 57; Draznin 1992: 251-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Wednesday Night
2
3Harry, I do belong to you. If I were married to anyone else, I would
4still belong to you, because our friendship that can be broken or done
5away with, any more than my feeling for Willy Bertram was a thing that
6could pass away. Afar off, it has been the only feeling that was like
7my feeling to you. I have not yet been able to work today, as I had to
8take so much cholodine last night to stop my cough. I am going to work
9now though before I go to bed a little.
10
11^The wind is howling oh so wild & mad outside. It is so hard to paint
12that bright African world with this dark wild world about one.^
13
14Olive
15
16The heart mustn’t ache. Ach, no, Harry, not about me.
17
18P.S. I never go to see Miss Jones she comes to see me. I only went
19once in for one moment to tell her I was not coming to take rooms in
20the Marina near to her. She keeps saying she would like to come & live
21with me &cc. It may be that she likes me, but there seems to me an
22exceeding bitterness in her. She askes me questions that you for
23instance have never thought of asking me. After her asking it three or
24four times in a round about ^Hintonian^ way & me refusing to answer her
25she said, “What I want to know is how you live, & where do you get
26money from?” with other questions of the same kind. “Why do you
27not live with your brother?” “What is the reason?”
28
29I am so sorry about our old Progressive.
30
31P.S. As I was writing my brother came in. He only stayed about 20
32minutes. He has gone now. He came to say that I must not let money
33stand in the way of my going to Montreux, if I thought that would do
34me good. I am going to try & write now. Good night, my boy. Good night
35Henry. I kiss you dear, & I want your heart never to ache, & never to
36break.
37
38Olive
39
40^My brother talks always so nicely of you. He feels nice to you I think.^
41
42My feeling is that there is nothing in life, but refraining from
43hurting others, & comforting those that are sad. What kind of feeling
44is that for an artist to be narrowed down to?
45
Notation
The first PS starting ‘I never go to see’ is on a separate piece of notebook paper. The second PS is on a small piece of paper and finishes with the insert ‘My brother talks’ after Schreiner’s second signature. The last paragraph is on an even smaller piece of paper. The insert starting ‘The wind is howling’ is on a small torn page; on the same page and crossed though is part of a trial text from From Man to Man, numbered as page 20, as follows:

‘“Don’t mind my having a cigar? – have to get accustomed to it, ah?” He pressed her little arm against his arm.
‘What ^have you^ been doing? Out here? ^when in^ - Listening to greasy ^her arm up^ Orpheus? – sings well” – A sweet smell of havanah smoke went in among the orange trees.
“No,” she said, “I have been ^thinking - ^ thinking
“Ordeal of tomorrow?”’

The characters here are Frank and Rebekah talking on the night before their wedding. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-x
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date10 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 49-50; Draznin 1992: 252-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. An associated envelope provides the address this letter was sent to.
1Alexandra House
2Dec 10 / 84
3
4Yes, Undine, the last part isn’t bitter because I wrote it not at
5Rattle Hoek, but at Ganna Hoek where I was so peaceful & hopeless &
6spiritual. It was the feeling I had in that year that I paint in Waldo
7when he goes to sit out in the sunshine, that placid calm, & I say
8that it was well to die so, because I knew that if one lived the eager,
9 striving, passionate heart would rise again. I may have copied it at
10Ga Rattle Hoek, I didn’t write it there, but in my little mud
11floored room with the holes in the roof at Ganna Hoek. I am afraid I
12am getting into that sweet resigned unpassionate state again.
13
14Why did you laugh at me so funnily for keeping the MS. of “An
15African Farm”? It puzzles me & I generally understand every thing
16you do. Why shouldn’t I keep my old MS. if, I like? It’s funny why
17you laughed at me & asked me if I thought they were so wonderful. I am
18working hard to-day. I wonder if I am doing good work or bad. One
19can’t know till a long time after. I am sending back my little boy.
20I like his little hands so.
21
22I am not doing any French or reading at all. I have only a little
23strength & I spend that on writing. I hardly know
24
25^why I wish for you tonight, but I do. I am not lonely, but I want to
26love you & make you happy a little.^
27
28Olive”
29
Notation
Inside the envelope in Schreiner's handwriting is, ' [envelope torn] st of books'. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 11 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 58; Draznin 1992: 254-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday Night
2
3I am waiting for the bell to ring for dinner. Oh that wild mad noise
4of the wind & water. It makes one’s heart sink. I get your letters at
5such a nice time now, just as it gets dark. I like that best of all.
6
7About your article I am so glad. I’ve got a feeling it will be taken.
8Whether it is or not you will come to see me. I shall have lots of
9money for us at Xmas. The great difficulty is that I don’t see what we
10are to do if you come here. We could never be together even for a
11little talk except we went out for a walk, & if the weather continues
12like this, we might not he able to go out once in a whole week. I
13should be able to get you a room here for 30/- a week board & all. I
14don’t see how we are to manage. I wish you were a woman. What do you
15think. I can’t get any apartments in which I could be well at a price
16I could pay.
17
18There is a tiny parlour here in which there are always from five to
19seven old ladies sitting!!
20
21I am working, very slowly, but still working. I am going to send for
22the books my mind cannot always brood on itself, eh? Have you had a
23letter from Estott Escott? Do you think I will get a guide to
24Switzerland like yours to Paris at the London.
25
26^I kiss you, my sweet boy. Oh Harry how lonely that water would sound
27to me if you were nowhere in the world^
28
29Olive
30Later
3110.30.
32
33I am just going to bed. I have done such good work. My chest troubles
34me so at night. You know Henry I don’t think I will ever be quite well
35again, but there’s no use taking about it. It so splendid to work when
36it is all one’s soul in it isn’t it? Now I would like to have you near
37me to rest.
38
39Good night my helper.
40Olive
41
Notation
Ellis’s article referred to is probably Havelock Ellis (1885) ‘The present position of English Criticism’ Time December 1885. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 12 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 50; Rive 1987: 58-9; Draznin 1992: 256-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday Night
2
3I have just done a scene. Henry my work takes so much out of me & it
4is so little in quantity when it is done. I mean it takes out of me in
5the way of feeling. It is like being continually in love.
6
7I did not get your letter so early as usual this evening I got it by
8the last post. I pressed my feet this evening afternoon there fore I
9can work. I have done such real work this evening, all my mind seemed
10alive & I was unconscious of myself.
11
12I want to keep that sweet little boy a little time. It is like you now
13Henry. Whom does it belong to?
14
15I have got him on my mantle piece. Some day when one of us can afford
16it we must have a likeness of taken life size, that I can always have it.
17
18I don’t think I did at all right to I tell you what I did about poor
19Miss Jones. I ought to rise above such little things as minding her
20questions, which after all are only part of her sad little pent up
21life. I think you ought to write her if you feel you can just an
22ordinary letter. Her address is 32 Marina.
23
24I think I shall be unwell tomorrow because my head throbs so.
25
26Henry, your heart must feel restful. I feel more & more that you & I
27are not destined to be parted in this life that nothing can really
28divide us.
29
30I think old Beaumont & Fletcher so grand. “And there were giants in
31those days.”
32
33I am going to bed, my friend.
34
35I think those narcotics, “Balsam of Anis-ced”, Chlorodine &c. have
36done me harm, in one way. Is there any kind of antidote one can take
37to oppose their constipating power?
38
39Olive
40
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter, has added a section from a different letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xiii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 13 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 259
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat Night
2
3I have just got the enclosed from poor Miss Jones. I have written to
4say I can’t come to dinner, but will look in in the afternoon. I’m
5glad Miss Haddon’s letter article is developing. I am working but have
6not yet done anything to-day as this morning I went for a walk & this
7afternoon Wilfred came & I took him to the pier. If you came how would
8it be if you took a bedroom & sitting room near to this & I some times
9came to see you. That is all I can think of. But how could my poor boy
10eat alone. What if you took the rooms but I made arrangements with my
11landlady for you to have your meals here. We could get rooms for 25/-
12& board here for h 25/- or perhaps if £1. That would only be £2.5 a
13week. I would like you to come
14 ^
15after Xmas when my brother & sister are at Northampton & London, then
16we could go over to Eastbourne & look at the grounds
17Olive^
18
19^Mrs. Cobb has sent me the Pall Mall for^
20
21^Wednesday the 10th with a splendid^
22
23^article by the author of a “Modern Lover” against W.H. Smith. Read it.^
24
Notation
Caroline Haddon’s article was published anonymously: Anon (1884) The Future of Marriage London: Foulger. The ‘Modern Lover’ reference is to George Moore (1884) “A New Censorship of Literature” Pall Mall Gazette 10 December 1884. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xivaHRC/CAT/OS/3b-xivb
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 14 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 50; Rive 1987: 59; Draznin 1992: 261-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sunday
2
3I think that article of Roden Noel’s splendid. It is the best thing
4that ever was written on Hinton. What is the article in the Daily Tel
5about & who is the woman who wrote it. I have come up from lunch. I
6don’t know if it ought to go out this afternoon it’s so wild & cold,
7but I don’t like to disappoint her. I shall only stay half an hour.
8
9My other-self, the little word I write to you & the word you write to
10me every day just makes life livable. I do not write about myself
11because just now practically I do not exist; my book exists; that is
12all, as far as my daily life goes. Bertie sitting there that hot day
13in the bush, with John Ferdinand. That is why writing makes me happy
14because then my own miserable little life is not. My darling, the one
15person who understands me, the one thing that is my very own, & to
16whom I belong whether I wish it or not! I think that’s so true that
17you only belong to those people to whom you can’t give yourself
18because they have you.
19
20Let me know as soon as you hear from Escott. I think he will take it.
21
22Olive
23
24^It has begun to rain. I can’t go to Miss Jones; I will write Are you
25going to the Progressive I wonder.^
26
27Sunday Night
28Late.
29
30I am just going to bed. I have been thinking so much about you I don’t
31know if I used to write you nicer letters than now. You were just
32nothing to me compared to what you are now. I was trying to fall in
33love with you at first, that I might “forget”. Now I know I cannot
34fall in love. If I love now it must be the slow long growth of years.
35
36I wish I could see some place for your coming It is so miserable even
37to have meals with these people here. They are so vulgar & it is like
38being at a private table. The landlady is a skeeming Mama & daughter
39is more painful still.
40
41Oh I wish you were a woman.
42
43Sweet, I am near to you. I would like you to be near me to night, so
44that we could nestle our heads together & tell eachother things about
45long ago. I like that little boy.
46
47Good night.
48Olive
49
Notation
Upside down at the end of the last page of the letter is 'Alexandra House Denmark Pl Hastings Dec 4 / 84', the discarded start of another letter. Roden Noel’s article on Hinton cannot be traced. Bertie and John Ferdinand are characters in From Man to Man. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version is misdated, omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3a-ix
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 15 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 263
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to a version in the Lafitte Letters typescript in the British Library. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday Night
2
3I suddenly feel as if it would be so nice if you were here. I want to
4talk with you. I have been keeping warm all day & taking chlorodine. I
5have tried to write a little with your pencil. I think I have one ^two^
6of your handkerchiefs. I read a little of Manon Lescaut to day. I am
7half through. I haven’t been out since Sat urday.
8
9Your sister
10Olive
11
12^Did what I told you make you love me less?^
13
Notation
This letter has been written with the pencil Schreiner refers to. The book referred to is: Abbe Prevost (1886) Manon Lescault London: Routledge. Draznin's (1992) version of the letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 16 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 51; Draznin 1992: 264-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday night ^evening^
2
3I am sorry your head is bad, it needs to be comforted I think. Don’t
4you? You are working & thinking, or rather feeling too much. I think
5that article on Ibsen’s later plays would be a good thing for you to
6write next.
7
8I did not go to Miss Jones’s to day she has asked me to go & spend
9tomorrow. I shall get out of it by saying I have to see Wilfred which
10is true. I feel so sad this evening a kind of feeling of physical
11sinking, & I d was nearly suffocated in the night last night
12
13Yes, the only way will be for you to have rooms close by. Could you
14come on Friday week. I don’t think I shall be able to go to Eastbourne,
15 but the weather may be better by that time. I think Miss Jones is so
16anxious I should go there, so that if you come, I shall feel bound to
17invite her, always. Oh Henry, I feel so sad & hopeless this evening I
18don’t know why. I think seeing Miss Jones always makes me feel so.
19
20Perhaps the rooms near here will be full just at Xmas, & then we must
21put off the coming a few days.
22
23Later. I think it is my cold room here at the top of the house with
24nothing over it makes my chest so bad. I have never had a cough keep
25on week after week like this before. Oh Henry I want to be strong &
26vigorous I don’t mind any pain, any suffering, but not to be dragged down.
27
28I have got splendid books, & the guide to Switzerland. The plays of B
29& F which I have read are “A Made’s Tragedy” & “Philaster” & the
30“Woman Hater.”
31
32Fancy, I can’t understand Balzac ^even^ when I have the translation in
33my hand, & I can read Manon almost without the dictionary.
34
35I wish you were here this evening, Henry. Send me back the “Pall Mall.
36” What was that article in the “Daily Tel”? Good bye, my sweet one, my
37treasure. I love you much more when I see strangers. “It is the world,
38the world that throws friend into friend’s arms” as Balzac says. When
39other people are near you then you
40
41^feel how one with you, how part of you that other one is.^
42
43Olive
44
45^Tell me how your head is.^
46
47Of course I didn’t mention Mrs Haddon’s article to Mrs. Cobb.
48
Notation
Upside down on the last sheet Schreiner has written and crossed out ‘Are you. Isn’t’. Schreiner refers to Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (1862) Plays (selected by Leigh Hunt) London: Henry G. Bohn. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 16 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 50; Draznin 1992: 265-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark. Our transcription follows archival order, while the version in Draznin (1992) is differently assembled. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday Night
2
3I think I read your letter over five times this evening. I am going to
4sit up & unreadable write late, because I have just got a new idea
5splendid. I have been trying to condense a chapter the wo wrong way
6now, I feel where I was wrong. I felt, I was wrong before but I didn’t
7know where. Your book on religion I know will be splendid, & I shall
8love it. My other self. Yes artistic work takes the life blood out of
9one. It lives by just as much as you lose
10
11^May I lend that Hinton thing to Mrs. Brown or are you in a hurry?^
12
13^Harry, I would like to kiss your old forehead.^
14
15^Read that little bit in ‘Far from &c’ about comradeship. It is at the
16end where they get engaged. It’s so beautiful.^
17
18Wednesday.
19
20Boy of mine, try to work & think to make up for me. I am going to try
21& work a little this morning. Fancy, I am not going to work for love
22of my work, the thing that drives me this morning is wanting money. It
23is dreadful to be so helpless & depend on other humanbeings but I
24can’t sacrifice my work for for money, & it will take me so long to
25finish it truly. If I had money I could always have some one I loved
26near me, & I could help other people who are lonely. & comfort them.
27Harry, how can I write hardly in my books when I know how all
28important love & sympathy are? Life seems
29
30^determined to keep pressing that on me till it spoils me as an artist.^
31
32Your,
33Olive
34
Notation
An Ellis book on religion cannot be traced. 'That Hinton thing' is likely to be a reference to James Hinton's unpublished essay, 'Thoughts on Home', which Ellis had been lent by Mrs Hinton and later passed on to Schreiner, 'Far from &c' is Thomas Hardy (1875) Far From the Madding Crowd London: Smith, Elder & Co. Draznin's version of this letter is in some respects different from ours. A short extract appears in Cronwright-Schreiner (1924).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xvii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 17 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 266-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. The letter from Eleanor Marx is no longer attached.
1Wednesday night
2
3I have just got your letter. I enclose Eleanor Marx’s. I should much
4like to come up to that Nora reading. How would it be if I was to come
5up for a week in place of your coming here. We should really be able
6to see so little of each other, there are days when I can’t get out
7at all; & we have no place here where we could talk for five minute.
8Then there is Miss Jones.
9
10You mustn’t mention E. Badford’s letter but I know Eleanor
11wouldn’t mind my sending it you.
12
13I got a nice letter from Mrs. Cobb this morning Send back the “Pall
14Mall.” You see I could see the Doctor if I came up, & I could get
15rooms in the heart of Bloomsbury & that might do me good. I should
16like & will try to find a boarding house as rooms in that part are too
17expensive.
18
19Oh Harry, if I could have spent all the winter in London.
20
21Olive
22
Notation
Upside down on the back of the second side of paper is a letter Schreiner had started and discarded:

‘Alexandra House
Denmark Pl
Hastings
Ja Dec 17 / 84
Dear Mrs Fremmin’.

The ‘Nora’ reading was of Frances Lord’s translation; see Henrik Ibsen (1882) Nora (later A Doll’s House) (trans. Henrietta Frances Lord) London: Giffith, Farran & Co. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.



Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xviiiHRC/UNCAT/NFPbb
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 18 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 51; Draznin 1992: 267-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter is composed of a number of pages, which are now separated in the HRC collections as the result of pre-archiving happenstance. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday afternoon
2
3My boy
4
5I send you Mrs Walters letter I wish you could get to like her
6something as I do. I told her you were perhaps going with me to Paris.
7She has been brooding over it ever since I can see. If even she thinks
8so of it would would other people think?!! But they must be taught not
9to think.
10
11I am going to write now. My chest has not let me work since the day
12before yesterday. My room is very cold so, I have hung up my rugs at
13the window & made it dark like night & I have lit my lamp to make it a
14little warmer. I don’t know that I think so very well of a woman’s
15paper. I object to anything that divides the two sexes. My main point
16is this – that human development has now reached a point at which
17sexual difference has become a thing of altogether minor importance.
18The mistake is that we make so much of it we are men
19
20^women in the second place humanbeings in the first.^
21
22That was such a sweet letter you wrote me. You are many ?hundred times
23dearer to me than you were six months ago.
24
25Olive
26
27Later
28Is my boy’s cold better? I can’t bear you to have anything the
29matter with you.
30
31Oh will Escott take our article If he does I want you to write
32something really good, your best on the woman question.
33
34Give my love to darling old Louie. I wish I had nice rooms & you & she
35came together & spent a whole week with me.
36
37Your little sister,
38Olive
39
40Later
41
42Read the bits in Mamma’s letter about the marks on the legs. Can you
43read the writing?
44
45Olive
46
Notation
The 'woman's paper' is probably The Woman’s World edited by Oscar Wilde between 1887 and 1890, in which Schreiner published some of her allegories, although it might also be the Women’s Penny Paper edited by Henrietta Muller. The letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. 'Our article' is a reference to: Havelock Ellis (1885) 'The present position of English Criticism' Time December 1885. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/NFPv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date18 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 269
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by relating its content to other letters in the Olive Schreiner/Havelock Ellis correspondence and considering its place in the sequence. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. The start of the letter and its middle section are now missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3Good night, my sweet. I kiss your precious face, & I love it all over.
4I can’t help loving you Harry. I can’t always be cold to [bottom half
5of paper torn]
6
7How beautiful you looked that day when you went away so happy at
8Belgrave Rd. I always think about that
9
10Olive
11
Notation
There is a version of this letter in Draznin (1992).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xx
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 20 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 270
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1Alexandra House
2Sat.
3
4I couldn’t write yesterday I wasn’t well enough.
5
6I wish you & I could be always together never separated except for a
7few days I wish I was a man
8
9Olive
10
Notation
A version of this letter is in Draznin (1992).

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 20 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 270
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat Morning
2
3I forgot to tell to tell you that Miss Jones came yesterday to invite
4me to stay with them from Sat to Monday. Of course I decline. I
5don’t know why she is so determined to have me.
6
7My chest is very bad. I have taken one little bed room on the fourth
8floor in Robertson Terrace. The sittingrooms there however small cost
9£2 a week but I am thankful to have got a bed-room, but I think I
10shall get better there because it is so sheltered. There’ll be the
11same impossibility of your coming to see me, but if you come I will
12get you a bed & sitting room some where close. & I will come every day
13& see my boy. What does it matter what Miss Jones says about me.
14
15Is my boys cold better? I have read that letter of yours over so often.
16 Ach Henry I’m not so beautiful & sweet “inside” as my boy
17thinks.
18
19Perhaps I shall get quite well at Robertson Terrace because it’s so
20sheltered Good by my comrade
21
22Your, Olive
23
24I can’t write nice letters now because I can’t think nice letters
25come out of a nice little, bright little head. I’ll be like that at
26Robertson Terrace.
27
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 21 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 51; Rive 1987: 59-60; Draznin 1992: 271-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sunday Morning
2
3Harry, my baby, you must feel comforted. I can see from your letters
4you are very miserable. Is the cold still troubling. I expect you feel
5weak after it. Would you rather come here than that I come to London?
6Eh my darling? Tell me?
7
8Please tell me who F W H Myers of Cambridge is. I have got a letter
9from him about S.A.F. & he seems to fancy I must know who he is & have
10read his books. He is I should think in the Educational Department at
11Whitehall because there is that mark on his paper. I have a floating
12idea I have read articles of his in the Ninteenth Cen. I think he is a
13friend of Donkins.
14
15Alexandra Hoe
16Sunday Night
17
18Miss Jones called again this afternoon. She came up stairs sat for a
19little while “Is Miss Ellis here?” “No, she only spoke of coming when
20I was ill for a few days.” (Waits.) “When is Mr. Ellis coming?” “I
21don’t know at all” “Isn’t he here now?” “No, he is not here now.” “I
22had a letter from him to say he was coming.” “I don’t know when he
23will come. I may be going up to London soon in that case he will not
24come at all.”
25
26It is clear now why she asked me to come & stay from Saturday till
27Monday. She dislikes me very much & I am so completely innocent of
28ever having done anything to injure her. I made up my mind three years
29ago never to let a woman care for me whom another woman thought she
30had any claim to, never to have more to do with him than I could help
31but I cannot see Miss Jones has any claim to you. Didn’t you perhaps
32without thinking give her more reason to suppose you meant to fill
33Hinton’s place to her that you at the time intended.
34
35Other women will never let me alone it doesn’t matter who or what I
36care for, they are jealous. Instead of making me cling to a thing it
37makes me feel at once “I don’t care let it go,” when people are
38jealous Isn’t it a funny point in my character. The moment that I felt
39even that my sister was jealous of my caring for my brother, I felt,
40“Now let me go, I don’t care any more.”
41
42You aren’t at all to blame my sweet, nor is Miss Jones, anymore than
43other people in my past life have been to blame, it’s my own nature.
44
45Please send me any book you may have of Myers.
46
47^Later^
48
49My darling boy, I think I ought to tear up what I’ve written. Don’t
50let it make you sad. You will come & see your little girl the week
51after next eh?
52
53Good night my own sweet darling.
54Olive
55
Notation
Myers published a number of books including: Frederic William Henry Meyers (1881) Wordsworth London: Macmillan; (1883) Essays: Modern London: Macmillan. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/SofLp
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 22 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 273
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to a version in the Lafitte Letters typescript in the British Library. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday
2
3Please post the enclosed to Mrs Cobb at once. My sweet darling, I like
4you to see every thing I write & know every thing I do. The idea I
5express in Mrs Cobbs letter would be the key note of my article if I
6wrote it.
7
8Olive
9
10^I am better today than I have been for the last week.^
11
Notation
Schreiner's 'my article if I wrote it' refers to a paper she was to have presented to the Men and Women?s Club but never completed. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxiv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 22 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 51-2; Rive 1987: 60-1; Draznin 1992: 273-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to an associated envelope and its postmark, which also provides the address it was sent to. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Monday Night
2
3I don’t know how it is I keep wanting to press my feet together, I
4won’t give way to the feeling, but I have it continually. I have not
5yet written anything today
6
7Ah, here is my letter!
8-------
9
10I am reading it I have just read the first page. Oh Harry how sweet
11that you think of me so much.
12
13No I wasn’t unselfish then, but I was trying hard to be, now I
14don’t try it’s becoming natural to me. I mean directly my interest
15comes into conflict with anyone’s, I want, I do give up mine, I
16don’t care for it. Of course always ever since I could remember if I
17loved a person really, like I loved Theo, & Ettie, & Ellie, then I had
18no self, they were everything, they were me, but I don’t call that
19being unselfish.
20
21Now I’ve read down the other page, & you say exactly what I say. You
22mustn’t do. You always say what I’m going to say. I write any more
23till I’ve finished the letter. What lay before me like an
24^intellectual^ ideal then has become part of me now. [half of the page
25torn off]
26
27Not that I’m as unselfish as I want to be, but some how it’s quite
28different, I always thought, “I’m cold & selfish now, but one day
29that great good man will love me, & I will be it all then.” Love did
30the work but it did its work differently from
I have finished your
31letter, my darling. If you [half of the page torn off]
32
33were to come just for two days, mightn’t you come & go without Miss
34Jones
finding you. One day would be spent in going to Eastbourne. If I
35get better in my new room you must come to go to Eastbourne, though I
36would rather take you when the weather was warm, & it looked like it
37used when I lived there that Spring & Summer.
38
39Can you explain to me what has made Miss Jones feel to me as she does.
40Have you acted differently to her since you knew me? My other self.
41
42Olive
43
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxv
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 December 1884
Address FromAlexandra House, Denmark Place, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsRive 1987: 61; Draznin 1992: 266-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The ?address to? is supplied by the envelope associated with this letter. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Xmas Eve.
2
3I do answer your questions! How don’t I? I am sitting in my bedroom
4at the foot of my bed. I have had such a wasted day. I have been
5packing & posting cards. I am very much better this evening, because I
6could lie down a little & sleep last night I took a lot of chlorodine.
7Miss Müller came to see me yesterday, we had a long argument on the
8woman question. She thinks we will have to rule over men in the future
9as they have ruled & trodden on us in the past. She says she can’t
10see that I have or can show any ground for believing in the likeness &
11equality of men & women, that no sane person can doubt that women are
12infinitely superior in intellect to men!!! I have just got a black
13dress from my brother & his wife for a Xmas present.
14
15I haven’t any letter from my boy, nothing since Monday evening. I
16will get it tomorrow.
17
18I hope I shall sleep tonight. Write me that sonnet of Myers if you
19know it. I want to get into my little bedroom
20
21I will see you perhaps before very long.
22
23What do you think does cause those marks on the legs? I feel so
24dissatisfied with myself. I would like to put my head down near by you,
25 & talk, & talk, & talk. My otherself, my sweet other self. I’ve
26been writing to Mrs. Walters about you. You are
27
28^are just to me like what^
29
30^Montaignes friend was to him^
31Isn’t that essay glorious!
32Olive
33
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxvii
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 December 1884
Address FromHastings, East Sussex
Address To24 Thornsett Road, South Penge Park, London
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 52; Rive 1987: 61-2; Draznin 1992: 277-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. The address this letter was sent to is provided by the envelope associated with it.
1Hastings
2Xmas Morning
3
4I wonder what you are doing this morning.
5
6I send you the first sheet of my letter to Mama to tell you what I
7have been doing.
8
9Fancy I haven’t got Tuesdays letter yet.
10
11The sun is shining so beautifully into my room. I wish you were here.
12
13I like Roden Noel’s poems. “Byron’s grave” & “The two Magdalenes” are
14as wholes the poems I like best, but these lines in Northern Spring
15are to me wonderful.
16
17“A bird hath a nest in a twilight of leaves,
18All woven of mosses, & lichen & down;
19An eye there is glistening a bosom there heaves;
20You may see there love’s miracle when she hath flown –
21Four delicate ovals flecked faintly with wine –
22She is guarding the mysticle marvel of life,”
23---------
24
25They seem to me quite to reach the high water of poetry. Perhaps I
26feel so because I am so one with animals & animal life, for I can’t
27tell why the lines affect me as they do.
28
29Oh those mornings in the bush at Ganna Hoek, when I used to go & lie
30under the rock & the birds used to come quite close to me & make love.
31I used to see them ^(kock-¬o-veets)^ singing to each-other, kiss
32each-other, rub their sweet little heads against each-¬other, & fly
33away, & one saw in one’s mind all the love & wonder to the end the
34little eggs coming, & the nest & the new little lives. I have often
35lain for an hour waiting for their coming. & wasn’t it strange they
36used always to come to the one place.
37
38Ach, I want to go back to that old life. I want to go away from this
39life. But if I went back could I live the old life. To my little
40mother it seems that life was so hard because I was half starved & had
41to work so hard. If any one could know how beautiful it was! And the
42five months at Eastbourne when I had every comfort & luxury was the
43bitterness of death to me. ^because I was of no use to anyone.^
44
45I think Harry if I go to the Engadine it will be very splend. I have
46been reading about it. I you could come & see me there, in the summer!!!
47
48Xmas Eve.
49
50I have got your two letters & Louies card. Thank her. I liked you to
51tell me about that girl.
52
53Miss Jones came again to-day. After she went last time I thought “Well
54of course she will never come again; was it right of me to be so
55pointedly cold, I may say rude.” & here she comes again. I am sure
56that she thought you were here. I don’t know how is that she has the
57power of irritating (not angering) me so. I can’t tell now, a long
58rigmarole about a book of hers that you have by “Roden Noel.” She
59would send me quite mad if I had to live with her for a week, even if
60we were talking about quite indifferent subjects. To see her put a
61room neat nearly sends me daft.
62
63And the thing is I feel I ought to be so sorry for her, & I am sorry
64for her.
65
66My brother didn’t send me the money he generally sends me for Xmas, he
67sent me a beautiful dress instead I didn’t get any letter
68
69^from him today.^
70
71Olive
72
73^Send the bit of Mamma’s letter back because I want to send it to her.^
74
Notation
The poems referred to are in: Roden Noel (1884) Songs of the Heights and Deep London: E. Stock. Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of the letter and is in a number of other respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/3b-xxvi
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 26 December 1884
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 280
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to a version in the Lafitte Letters typescript in the British Library.
14 Robertson ^Terrace^
2Hastings
3Friday night
4
5My comrade,
6
7I have got here, but I’m not yet in my bedroom. Some one else has got
8it so the woman has given me the dining-room for this week with a
9little bed put in the corner for me. If you could come while I am in
10this room it would be rather nice, even if it were for only three days.
11 Will ^Would^ you be able to come any day next week?
12
13I some how want to see you so badly. & yet Id can’t feel as if it was
14good for you to come. It mustn’t make you sad.
15
16Miss Müller came again today to see me, & I think she is coming again
17on Sunday morning to spend the morning with me. Some-how I think she
18likes me very much. I fancy too I am getting her a little bit over to
19my view. I think I shall be better here. Is m I seem to have been
20living in a kind of dark dream for months, from physical causes so
21clouded over.
22
23Mrs Miss Jones came to see me this afternoon. I was out. She left a
24message asking me to go & spend tomorrow with her, & sleep there I am
25going in the morning to say I can’t stay because I have my writing to do.
26
27You know I don’t get really better. I am not like I was when I came
28from the Marina, of course, but every breathe I fight for. Which is
29the best asthma man in Londond?
30
31Good night! I hope you are going to have a sweet restful night. My
32book is pressing
33
34^fearfully on me. Olive^
35
36^When will the light come I want my boy tonight Because I haven’t had
37any letter I am reading his old one.^
38
39I have two vols of Myers sent from the London, poems. I understand
40what you say about him
41
42Olive
43
Notation
The two volumes of Meyers are Frederic William Henry Meyers (1881) Wordsworth London: Macmillan; and (1883) Essays: Modern London: Macmillan. The book Schreiner comments is 'pressing' is From Man to Man. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/CAT/OS/FRAG/NFPf
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 283
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992) who has done so by relating its content to other letters in the Olive Schreiner/Havelock Ellis correspondence and its place in the sequence. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. The beginning of the letter is now missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3am so selfish not to want it. Ah, Harry, what is all your future life
4going to be, I wish I could see it! Sweet, & full, & true whatever it
5is I know.
6
7Your
8Olive
9
10It is n’t the chloral makes me faint its just the old thing. I’ll
11never take another Turkish Bath
12
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-5
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date14 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 286
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. The first page of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3I hope my little Australian thing will be written soon. I want to see
4it. You are very young, Henry. I was thinking the other day George
5Eliot was 7 years older than you & she’d not yet begun to write
6anything but those few poor articles in the Westminster. I like you
7best when you’re expressing yourself & not critical (to judge from
8what I’ve seen!) I couldn’t answer Myers; I just wrote to tell him I
9would write soon. I have been lying down all day.
10
11Olive
12
13^K Pearsons essay is the one about Hamerling^
14
Notation
'My little Australian thing' is Ellis's projected book about his time in Australia: Havelock Ellis (1922) Kanga Creek: An Australian Idyll Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press. The Hamerling reference is to: Robert Hamerling (1882) Aspasia: A Romance of Art and Love in Ancient Hellas New Tork: Gottsberger Peck. Pearson was responding to Robert Hamerling's (1882) Amor und Psyche Leipzig. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-6
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 16 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 56; Draznin 1992: 286-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday
2
3I have found my little boy!!
4
5I have lit my lamp and hung up the things at the window.
6
7How is your cold do you feel very tired? I never seem^ed^ to my self so
8small & selfish before. You see I am so selfish to you too. I am think
9more of my self than you it seems.
10
11I long to sit down by the fire by your feet, & talk to you, & tell you
12all the thoughts in my heart. How wonder-ful you, & I should be like
13in each other it seems so wonderful to me. You know I don’t mind
14anything I said because I said it to you, it’s that could say such
15things aloud to myself & you know it wasn’t true. Oh Harry I want to
16be good, I want to be good, not good in the ordinary sense, good to my
17idea. Never mind telling me if you think I’m ever wrong, if you see
18the faults in me you must blame me, not praise me. We mustn’t forget
19that part of our sharing each other’s lives. We mustn’t little let
20passion come in, & divide the real union.
21
22Thou art mine Is Louie better, tell her I’m so sorry her cold is so
23bad. The has just brought my coffee in. I don’t like to drink my
24coffee alone.
25
26Olive
27
28I have read Pity She’s a Whore. Isn’t it splendid! I read it
29
30^in the middle of the night.^
31
Notation
The edition of John Ford's ?Tis A Pity She’s A Whore Schreiner read cannot be established; an edition by Ellis was published in 1888. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-48
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 16 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 56; Draznin 1992: 288
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday Night.
2
3Today as soon as I leave off writing to you I want to begin again.
4
5Do you know we have always 5 or 10 pounds here when we really need it.
6We might feel it necessary for you to stay a little longer at the
7hospital, or anything like that & if so it might be useful to have the
8pounds so we must keep them ready. I don’t mind our spending money
9on necessity, do you, its only when its for pleasure selfish pleasure.
10It’s rather important to me that your mind shouldn’t be worried or
11hurried by little things like that just now. My swan, my swan, that
12nobody knows yet just like I know it. It isn’t the work you will, or
13can do that’s wonderful to me, it’s what you are. Someday when you
14have written & worked & found your place in the world other
15people’ll see you differently, but I’ll see only my old Harry. Not
16more wonderful to me, perhaps in one way less, because now I feel like
17like a man hidden in his hand & nobody knows that he’s got it.
18
19Goodnight
20Olive
21
22That nux vomica is so good, so good for me. I feel so strong ^in my head^
23today I can remember every thing! My legs are still just the same, ^but^
24its only the symal “lymphatic system”. I was up much last night
25with the asthma but took chloral.
26
27Just got letter. Oh Harry our article. Ach, I don’t care, send it
28the Nineteenth.
29
30Olive.
31
32^I ought to have sent Escott’s letter back.^
33
34
Notation
'Our article' refers to an article by Ellis sent to the Fortnightly Review which had been rejected, and which eventually appeared as: Havelock Ellis (1885) 'The present position of English Criticism' Time December 1885. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-158
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 18 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 56; Draznin 1992: 289-90
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. In the absence of other information, dating this letter has followed Draznin (1992), who has done so by reference to a version in Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) The Letters. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. The end of the letter may be missing.
1Sunday Morning
2
3Escotts letter I send back. Let us send it now to the Nineteenth
4Century, (I which is almost sure not to take a ^purely^ literary article
5but let us try) then to the Contemp. then to Macmillan. I expect the
6reason is that Escott has got some other literary articles & sees that
7he won’t have room for it for six months. I know it will be published
8some where else. Had it better go to the Contem first & then if not
9taken to the Nineteenth? Isn’t it strange I don’t feel a little bit
10doubtful about our articles fate though I haven’t read it. Ach, he
11felt irritable yesterday, & then that letter came to trouble more! I
12like the irritable letter.
13
14Perhaps Escott has got to know someone who knows you & has asked him
15why he takes the article of an unknown medical student! You know you
16have such a way of writing that from reading your letters writings one
17would think you were an old established critic! Sweet, our article
18will come out all right in the end; just like S.A.F. Though I did walk
19up Regent Street with it in the rain, thinking every one could know
20that what was stuck under my cloak was a rejected M.S. – oh, so heart sick.
21
22[page/s missing]
23
Notation
What Schreiner comments should be 'sent to the Nineteenth' is Ellis's rejected article on criticism, which eventually appeared as: Havelock Ellis (1885) 'The present position of English Criticism' Time December 1885. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-7
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 24 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 296
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sat Afternoon
2
3I am wonderfully ?pr better today. Are you better too, & the head
4doesn’t ache now? I fear you have felt, too more anxious about me than
5there was any need to I shall get well again someday darling.
6
7The doctor comes every day now, & he does not give me any more chloral.
8
9I hope you will be able to go & see Eleanor soon. Tell her how it is I
10can’t write, but I shall soon. My legs seem getting much better with
11his lying still.
12
13In talking with Aveling don’t say anything he could lay hold of, he is
14so anxious to find some evil point in our friendship. I long for thy
15face. It is strange that ever since you were here this last time even
16in my half stupor I see it – I never did before, & it looks beautiful
17to me. Give my love to Louie. I am not going to struggle or cry out or
18strive to be well anymore. I am just going to lie quite passive & wait
19
20Olive
21
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-8
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 25 January 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 57; Draznin 1992: 297
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Sunday Morning
2
3My little bit of sweet sunshine came this morning: thankyou for it. It
4was good to know you are about, it makes ^me^ also stronger. My
5other-self, my brother came to see me last night He was so wonderful
6tender to me. It seems like a dream. He talked so nicely of you. I
7told him how near we were. My otherself, you are part of me, no love
8that I give to anyone else comes between us. Let thy heart rest.
9
10I wrote a nice little note to Miss Jones. Somehow I feel so loving to
11every one. I am so weak sometimes I feel I shall never be well again,
12but I am very happy. Ach every thing good comes to those people who
13wait, Henry. The sympathy I have longed for the feeling of never being
14alone in the world you have brought me, perhaps if I wait I shall have
15the power to work brought back to me too. But oh Henry it would be so
16beautiful just to lean my head back as I am sitting here & die. I am
17just satisfied now.
18
19Your, Olive
20
21Henry you know all I have suffered in my life has been my own fault
22nearly. If I had been wise, & unselfish I wouldn’t have suffered – but
23
24Evening late.
25Goodnight boy. Sleep sweet.
26
27^Please go to see Eleanor if you can.^
28
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-13
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 5 February 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 60-1; Draznin 1992: 303-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday eve.
2
3Too cold to go to church & hear Messiah. I don’t want to take cold
4now I am working.
5
6Have just got your letter. The part of my life that stands out almost
7more clearly than anything else like an imprinted picture, is one
8morning at Palace Rd. It was the last awful Sunday I spent there. All
9night I thought I was going mad & lay on the floor & walked up & down;
10at dawn about half past four I went to the chemists in that street
11that runs down just at the bottom of Palace Rd. There is a chem shop
12just near the corner. I stood there knocking for half an hour, but no
13one heard. I wanted bromide or something more to make one sleep.
14
15I can see that scene just as that looked to me, printed like one of
16Hogarths pictures. While I stood there waiting a dirty milkman came
17with his pails, & he stopped at the house opposite & some dirty wicked
18looking women, a woman & a girl in curl papers & finery came to the
19door, & talked low talk with him & laughed low laughs. The chemist
20came down at last in his nightshirt with his trowsers on & gave me the
21medicine. It had been raining in the night & the street was damp, but
22it was a fine morning. Yes how wonderful & beautiful if you had come
23to me then! I have been thinking about you today when ever I have I
24not been working.
25
26I have translated the preface of that book. What a lovely style. The
27very kind of book I wanted. I wouldn’t miss a word because every
28word stands for an idea. As soon as I have done this do you think I
29will be able to manage Taine?
30
31What is “Lu’il ferait mieux^better^ de vivre ^of life^?” What is
32ferait? Ferir is to strike. What does it mean?
33
34I must get to my writing now. I must get my book ready by June & & I
35will if I go on like this. I want very much to see you this evening.
36
37Olive
38
39You know I think it would be nice if every one called you Havelock. It
40seems much more like you than Henry. I would call it you only I know I
41shall shorten it into some pet name before long.
42
43^Henry Ellis is really no name. There are three Henry Ellis’s in St.
44Leonards.^
45
Notation
What the preface was that Schreineer had translated cannot be established. Which of Hippolyte Taine's publications Schreiner might have been thinking of cannot be discerned, but Schreiner is likely to have been familiar with his (1870 translated) English Positivism: A Study on J.S. Mill London: Simpkin, Marshall. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-10
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 February 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 307-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885. The beginning of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3you & I are just now showing eachother enough of our mental slates, &
4therefore we can not rightly sympathize with & help each other; though
5the deepest wish in both of our hearts is to help the other one. What
6help & comfort you are to me I hardly think you realize.
7
8I don’t want to “push you” farther from me, my darling, I want to draw
9you nearer & nearer to me, the real me. I want us to be able perfectly
10to understand all sides of eachother’s nature. My darling sweet soul,
11that journeying with mine.
12
13Good bye, until tomorrow.
14Olive
15
16I am so glad to think of seeing Louie.
17
Notation
Draznin’s (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-11
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 13 February 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 308
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Friday
2
3I wish today was the day for you to come. I wasn’t sweet to you
4yesterday, my darling, I seemed not to trust you, but deep in my heart
5lies a trust of you so perfect that sometimes the thought comes to me
6“How can you believe in him so perfectly,” but yet I do, And yet I
7feel that we are near together in heart for always. You can’t go
8away from me wherever you take yourself M I felt such a heart sick
9agony this morning I wished I had arranged to go back to St. Leonards
10today. I would go if you were here now. It is sad here. You always go
11away. I want us to go to the “Messiah” on Sat. if we can.
12
13Good bye. my sweet bright face. So bright it looks when its happy. Why
14don’t I always make it happy.
15Olive
16
17^Olive, I hope you will be able to come on Saturday morning.^
18
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-12
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 18 February 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 310
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday.
2
3Good morning!
4
5I hope Louie wasn’t very tired last night. I feel so well this
6morning, brimful of energy. You too my darling, my comfort.
7
8When you are with me I never can show just how my heart feels. I
9don’t know how it is.
10
11You are more to me than you think. I hope you will be able to work
12today.
13
14Olive
15
16Miss Lord can’t come.
17
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-14
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 24 February 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 60; Draznin 1992: 311
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis.
14 Rob. Ter.
2Tuesday Eve.
3
4I am sending you our article. It is exceedingly interesting (I am
5speaking critically now) one who began it would not lay it down till
6they had finished it. The style is first rate – perhaps if you left
7out conjunctions &c, & a little compressed sentences here & there
8^(It’s only here & there)^ it might make the style stronger, but I am
9not sure that I am right. The last page is f weak, the last two
10centences ?fully, ^especially^ & nothing else is weak at all in idea
11except that one has been want Personally, I agree with all you say. I
12like exceedingly what you say about Symonds. Perhaps you The article
13would be much better however, if after pitching into all those men &
14doing the dam’d fine horse, you would tell us what criticism really
15was!! You give one an idea at first that you are going to & in the end
16it all seems to come to nothing.
17
18I fancy that in writing your article you do not always set up the
19skeleton before you begin to lay on the flesh. (I’m critic now) X My
20feeling when I read it was one of delight & suprise, it was much finer
21than I had expected You will perhaps find some difficulty in getting
22it published because it seems to pitch into Mr Arnold, &c. & the
23editors might be their personal friends. If once it were published it
24would be much read, & a great success, that is if it were published in
25a review.
26
27Don’t you ^think^ that if you write another article on the woman
28question say, that you must follow the plan that makes your sonnets so
29ess strong, first of all make you end keep it clearly in your mind &
30work up to it? It is that which makes your sonnets so strong.
31
32X I am writing not walking & getting excited. I have done so much
33to-day because Wilfred came this morning & I had to see Miss Jones
34this afternoon They leave on Thursday. Write to her.
35
36^Work much, my treasure. Yes, the change my visit to London worked in
37me is wonderful My mind being so strong I have those feelings that
38always go with that state^
39
40Olive
41
Notation
Schreiner's 'our article' comments refer to Ellis's rejected criticism article, which eventually appeared as: Havelock Ellis (1885) 'The present position of English criticism' Time December 1885. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) short extract includes material from a different letter and is also incorrect in other ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-15
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 4 March 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsDraznin 1992: 314
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Wednesday
2
3My sweet boy, I have just got your letter. It makes me sad. What can I
4do to make my comrade happy. I know I’m so horrid now I’m writing.
5I’m just in a kind of dream You needn’t burn any of my letters
6except I make a big + on them then you must.
7
8I want to put my arms round you & comfort you. You will be loved
9always & much wherever you go, loved more than Mrs Cobb loves Pearson.
10I think my love for you is deeper than her’s for him, even now, my
11darling. And much love is wanting for you in the future, better love
12than mine perhaps – not deeper. I think you don’t quite know what
13you are to me.
14
15I have not been able to work today, that is, I haven’t got on. I
16haven’t any physical trouble today I suppose that’s why. That
17passionate feeling & the creative are like the two sides of one
18substance.
19
20Are you well? Please tell me all about yourself. When the time comes
21for your letter to come sometimes I can’t wait. I have to run down &
22fetch it.
23
24Good evening. It’s such a soft grey, sad evening outside.
25
26I’ll Olive
27
28I think of you always when I get into bed. I have such long talks with
29you in the dark.
30
31The sonnet
32
33^Mrs Cobb writes about is your sonnet.^
34
Notation
Ellis's sonnets were not published as a collection until much leter: Havelock Ellis (1925) Sonnets With Folk Songs From the Spanish Waltham St Lawrence: Golden Cockerel Press. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-16
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 10 March 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 63; Draznin 1992: 316-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Tuesday Eve ^Night^
2
3My boy, why do I feel so loving to you whenever I have been among
4other people? I went to the woman’s meeting this afternoon. There
5was only one really fine speech, & that was by a man! There It was a
6drawingroom meeting, there were only three men there. He was a
7splendid fellow, a great advocate for womans rights He stood up at the
8end of the meeting when he was asked to second the resolution & said a
9few words. He said it was because women were such cowards that they
10didn’t get what they wanted. “You can’t serve God and Mammon,
11Mrs. Grundy & yet attain what you wish & –
12
13I’ve just got your letter. Isn’t it funny I felt just as you did
14last night just as if I had fever, burning all over & crying, but for
15three nights I seemed quite delirious. I feel today aching all over,
16but better than yesterday. I feel better when the sunlight comes. You
17mustn’t feel everything I feel!! I wondered last night in the middle
18of the night if you were sleeping & if you were thinking of me if you
19were awake.
20
21I don’t know what to do with my mind perhaps I had better go over to
22Eastbourne for a day, & then I shall rest a little I can’t bear it
23any more there just comes a time when you can’t you know.
24
25I was pressed my legs this morning I thought it would do good, &
26yesterday too, but it doesn’t help. Good night my darling. I would
27come to London every three weeks if I could afford it.
28
29Olive
30
31^I would like to have you here & pet my boy a little tonight.^
32
Notation
Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-38
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 12 March 1885
Address From4 Robertson Terrace, Hastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 64; Draznin 1992: 318
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to information written onto it by Ellis. Schreiner was resident at two addresses in Hastings from the end of November 1884 to the end of April 1885.
1Thursday eve.
2
3Have been working today again. The going to Pevensey seems to have
4soothed me.
5
6I am just reading your letter.
7
8It makes my heart nearly crack when I think of going abroad. You, all
9alone in England even if you have your mother & sisters with you, & I
10alone even if I have the mountains. I don’t think you know how much
11you are to me. I don’t say much of my feeling for you because I know
12what a terrible thing it is when tender words are said to one &
13afterwards one doesn’t seem to have all one hoped for.
14
15Olive
16
17^Read Montaigne’s magnificent essay on repentance. It is one of my
18favourites.^
19
Notation
The book referred to is: Michel de Montaigne (1877) Essays (ed. William Hazlitt) London: Blackie. Draznin's (1992) version of this letter is in some respects different from our transcription. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) extract is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference HRC/UNCAT/OS-17
ArchiveHarry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin