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Hamilton Hope

Hamilton Hope was the husband of Schreiner’s cousin Emmie Hope nee Rolland. Olive Schreiner stayed with them and had considerable affection for both her cousin and Hope. Hamilton Hope worked as a magistrate at Qumbu in the Cape Colony and had tried to obtain support from the local Mpondomise people in helping to suppress the Basotho uprising which broke out in September 1880. As a result he was killed, “stabbed to death with assegais” (Schoeman 1991: 501), along with two of his clerks, in October 1880. It is likely that some letters were exchanged between Schreiner and Hope, although none have been traced.

For further information see:
Clifton Crais (2002) “The death of Hope” in his The Politics of Evil: Magic, State Power and the Political Imagination in South Africa Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.35-67
Karel Schoeman (1991) Olive Schreiner: A Woman in South Africa 1855-1881 Johannesburg: Jonathan Ball
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