"George Murray killed; my heart is folding round you with love; I hate war" Read the full letter
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Letter ReferenceOlive Schreiner BC16/Box2/Fold3/1900/24
ArchiveUniversity of Cape Town, Manuscripts & Archives, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateApril 1900
Address FromWagenaars Kraal, Three Sisters, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToFrances ('Fan') Schreiner nee Reitz
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Manuscripts and Archives, University of Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscripts and Archives Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner stayed at Wagenaars Kraal from 21 February until late July 1900.
1 Dear Fan
2
3 Please send the enclosed letter of Cron’s on to his mother (when you
4& Will have read it if you care to) & the two enclosed letters. The
5old lady will be glad to hear how kindly some people think of Cron.
6
7 Let Will see Steads note as it may interest him. I am so glad some
8arrangement has been made about Keetje’s little ones. Dear old
9?Mastlaant wrote to me. Dear its terribly lonely here. I have been
10unable to work for three weeks but the last two days I ^am better, &
11finishing my book on the Boer.
12
13 Love to you all
14 Olive^
15
16^Cron says Rhodes is losing cast quickly in England his attacks on the
17military are telling heavily against him. ^
18
19 Do you & Will take the Morning Leader, it is a fine paper. Cron
20sometimes sends me a copy.
21
Notation
The enclosed letters are no longer attached. The 'book on the Boer' refers to 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa', which was to have been composed by the essays originally published pseudonymously as by 'A Returned South African'. Although prepared for book publication, a dispute with a US publisher and the South African War prevented this. They and some other essays were posthumously published as Thoughts on South Africa.