"Du Bois, great desolating native war" Read the full letter
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Letter ReferenceOlive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateOctober 1914
Address From4 Gloucester Place, Portman Square, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Dear Anna,
2
3 Will you please send the enclosed to Cron. They are beginning to have
4Martial Law here, & often letters &c &c. I am not sure whether any
5letters sent straight to him will reach him if you write to me address
6the envelope to
7
8 c/o Mrs Smith
9 4 Gloucester Place
10 Portman Sq
11 London
12
13 & enclose the closed envelope with my letter addressed to me. & she
14will send it on. Please send the cuttings on to Cron too & if I send
15you any news papers please send them on too.
16
17 I think I have at last found a place of refuge, a tiny flat in Chelsea
18- but I'm not quite sure I shall be able to get it. in this war The
19war fever here is worse than in the Boer war; it is madness. The more
20terrified the people get the more cruel they they get.
21
22 I hope you are all well. Don't forget me & write to me.
23
24 I'm trying to write an article, & will send it you if any paper will
25publish it. People don't want to hear the truth any more than they did
26in the Boer war.
27
28 Love to you all
29 Olive
30
31^You can read my letter to Cron & then put it with cutting. Please send
32me a post card to say you have this.^
33
Notation
The article Schreiner refers to cannot be established, but could have been the never comppleted 'The Dawn of Civilization', which she appears to have begun at around this time, or one of her wartime allegories.