"First real letter to Ellis, Spencer's First Principles" Read the full letter
Collection Summary | View All |  Arrange By:
< Prev |
Viewing Item
of 174 | Next >
Letter ReferenceOlive Schreiner: Mimmie Murray 2001.24/11
ArchiveNational English Literary Museum, Grahamstown
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 February 1909
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMinnie or Mimmie Murray nee Parkes
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National English Literary Museum (NELM) for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscript Collections.
1 Matjiesfontein
2 Feb 7th 1909
3
4 Dear Mrs Murray
5
6 Yes, make any use you like of Lady Constance Lytton's letter that you
7think will be useful, but don't let any of it get into print. By the
8post which has just come & brought me your letter, is also one from
9her, very full of joy in the work & enthusiastic love for Mrs Pethick
10Lawrence
& the other leaders.
11
12 I do think you will be so very right in starting & working your own
13society entirely unconnected with those in Cape Town. Why not ^too^ call
14yours simply "the Woman's Association" & make it a little broader in
15its scope - to take in all matters directly affecting womans position;
16I have resigned my position as the President of the woman's
17enfranchisement but When I am in Cape Town I want you & some other
18women such as Mrs Brown Mrs Charles Molteno, Mrs Murray, Mrs Purcell,
19that splendid woman Mrs Advocate de Villiers &c to come together &
20form a little society not at all to oppose any other woman's league
21but on a broader basis. But we can speak of this when we meet.
22
23 Your letter is very cheering & valuable.
24
25 Yours ever
26 Olive Schreiner
27
28 I know Con Lytton would like any use to be made of any thing she wrote
29that she thought could possibly help us in our work. I send you her
30last to me with a few lines about her work.
31
Notation
The enclosed 'few lines' from Constance Lytton are no longer attached.