"Hounding of Mashona, evil keeps begetting itself, mills of God" Read the full letter
Collection Summary | View All |  Arrange By:
< Prev |
Viewing Item
of 37 | Next >
Letter ReferenceMacFarlane-Muirhead/33
ArchiveMacFarlane Collection
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday January 1916
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToRobert Franklin ('Bob') Muirhead
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Mrs Hazel MacFarlane for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter to Bob Muirhead, which is part of the MacFarlane family collection of Muirhead Papers, Special Collections, University of Glasgow Library. The deputation Schreiner refers to occurred around her and other signatories (probably organised by Bertrand Russell) sending a letter of support for Sir John Simon to The Times in response to Asquith's wartime Coalition Government introducing a Military Service Bill for compulsory conscription on 1 January 1916 (see The Times, Wednesday 12 January 1916, page 5, column 1); thus the dating of this letter.
130 St Mary Abbotts Terrace
2Kensington
3^Friday^
4
5Dear Bob
6
7Thank you for your letter. I wonder what you feel on the cons-cription
8question & what stand the working men are going to take on it. I went
9with a deputation of about 60 others to the House of Commons to meet
10Sir John Simons & the MP’s who are opposed to conscription; it was
11very interesting but the pro-ceedings were private. No news paper
12reporters were there. I think I shall join the no-conscription fellow
13ship if they take women. Its the one society I absolutely agree with.
14
15I am looking forward to coming to see you all in the spring. The
16weather here is splendid for this time of year, cold & dry, which
17suits. me.
18
19Things, as far as the war goes, seem to me in a much better position
20than they were this time last year. It seems as if peace must come
21before the year is out.
22
23But our great difficulties will come when the war is over. Then will
24come the hunger & the pinch I think the government has been very wrong
25in borrowing these vast sums instead of raising taxation, at once, as
26they will have to do at last.
27
28Give my love to Lene. She must be wonderfully full of energy &
29capacity to do all you say she does. I only hope she will not tax
30herself too much. I’m glad to hear your brother sympathizes with my
31view of things. Have you studied the matter of our dealings with
32Persia during the last years. Have you read Shusters Book, “The
33Strangling of Persia”, & Bernier’s book on the Late Revolution in
34Persia. Its a dark page in our history the way we have helped Russia
35to strangle the ?them. I am still living here in my one little room. I
36seldom see any one, but have lovely rides up & down the streets on the
37top of the omnibus; which is my great joy in life. Any kind of
38movement is so delightful to me & does me such good.
39
40Good bye.
41Love to you all.
42Yours ever
43Olive
44
Notation
The books referred to are: W. Morgan Shuster (1912) The Strangling of Persia: A Record of European Diplomacy and Oriental Intrigue London: T. Fisher Unwin; Franc╠žois Bernier (1914 [1670]) The History of the late Revolution of the Empire of the Great Mogol London: Oxford University Press; and Russell's relevant publications are in Richard A. Hempel (ed, 1988) Bertrand Russell: His Works vol. 13 ‘Prophecy and Dissent’ 1914-1916 London: Unwin.