Legal statement goes here 2020-08-15T03:07:14 955 1 TEAMS Middle English Texts Series John Metham, Amoryus and Cleopeshttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/amorfrm.htmin Latin grammar lessons in the later Middle Ages. The story is reworked in the Middle English romance Sir Orfeo. See The Middle English Breton Lays, ed. Anne Laskaya and Eve Salisbury (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 1995). 553 sqwan, thatThe Dialogue of Solomon and Marcolfhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/bndsmfr.htman infant of days there, nor an old man that shall not fill up his days: for the child shall die a hundred years old, and the sinner being a hundred years old shall be accursed” ["non erit ibi ampliusAlliterative Morte Arthurehttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/allitfrm.htmed. The Alliterative Morte Arthure. New York: Burt Franklin and Company, Inc., 1976. OED: Oxford English Dictionary OL: J. L. N. O'Loughlin. "The Middle English Alliterative Morte Arthure." Medium Aevum 4 (1935), 153-168. 1 Himselven. On the prominence of reflexiveAlliterative Morte Arthurehttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/alltfrm2.htmed. The Alliterative Morte Arthure. New York: Burt Franklin and Company, Inc., 1976. OED: Oxford English Dictionary OL: J. L. N. O'Loughlin. "The Middle English Alliterative Morte Arthure." Medium Aevum 4 (1935), 153-168. 1 Himselven. On the prominence of reflexiveKing Hornhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/hornfrm.htmthe morning" in secular usage. 863 He yaf dentes inoghe. "He gave enough blows," a typical understatement in Old and Middle English battle descriptions. 871-72 Bote of the King Murry, / That wes swithe sturdy. These two lines are suppliedThomas Hoccleve, The Regiment of Princeshttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/hoccfrm.htmlesse, A poore old hoor man cam walkynge by me, And seide, "Good day, sire, and God yow blesse!" But I no word, for my seekly distresse Forbad myn eres usen hir office, For which this old man heeld meRobert Henryson, Orpheus and Eurydicehttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/pdrhoef.htmed.: The Poems of Robert Henryson, ed. Fox; Gray: Gray, Robert Henryson; MED: Middle English Dictionary; NIMEV: Boffey and Edwards, eds., New Index of Middle English Verse; Orpheus: Henryson, Orpheus and Eurydice; Testament: Henryson, The Testament of Cresseid; TC: Chaucer,Mankindhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/ashfr.htmEccles, Mankind in Macro Plays; L: Lester, Mankind in Three Late Medieval Morality Plays; MED: Middle English Dictionary; MM: Digby Mary Magdalene; OED: Oxford English Dictionary; OI: Occu­pation and Idlenes; S: Smart, “Some Notes on Mankind;” s.d.: stage direction; W:Part Twohttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/mjprpart2fr.htmliving, but never quotes this specific verse. PART TWO: EXPLANATORY NOTES Abbreviations: CT: Chaucer, Canterbury Tales; MED: Middle English Dictionary; OED: Oxford English Dictionary; PL: Patrologia Latina, ed. Migne. 1–4 “Worldes” in line 1 is plural (heaven, hell, and earth,The Palis of Honourehttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/palisfrm.htmMary (Woolf 130, 279). See Heroic Women from the Old Testament in Middle English Verse, ed. Russell A. Peck (Kalamazoo: Medieval Institute Publications, 1991), pp. 109-53, for a fifteenth-century Middle English version of the Judith story, which praises her firmThe Life of Saint Francis in the South English Legendaryhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/whfrafrm.htmSaint Francis in the South English Legendary Return to Menu of TEAMS Texts Copyright Information for this edition 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110Stanzaic Guy of Warwick: Introductionhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/guywint.htmSee An Anonymous Short English Metrical Chronicle. Sir Amadace. See Amis and Amiloun. Sir Cleges. See The Middle English Breton Lays. Sir Eglamour of Artois. See Four Middle English Romances. Sir Gowther. See The Middle English Breton Lays. Sir Isumbras.Part Sixhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/mjprpart6fr.htmSee below, 7.110–14. 49 The “tonges of steel” motif can be found in Irish and Old English sources, as well as elsewhere in Middle English. See Wright, Irish Tradition, pp. 150–51. 80 John 11. Lazarus, brother of Mary of Bethany,Codex Ashmole 61: Item 41, King Edward and the Hermithttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/sgas41frm.htmWe may schew you at a syght Two thousand dere this same nyght, Or the son go to reste.” An old foster drew hym nere: “Lystins, lord, I saw a dere Under a tre; So grete a hed as heItem 40, Vanity: Introductionhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/sgas40int.htm238–40. [See also the many similar lyrics pp. 222–66.] Reference Works NIMEV 2576 MWME 9.22.290.3024, 3390 Greentree, Rosemary. The Middle English Lyric and Short Poem. See also Barclay, Bowers (1952), C. Brown (1924), Girvan, Lothario dei Segni, Lumby, H. Mac­CrackenCapgrave, The Life of Saint Katherine: Introductionhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/katintro.htmto designate modern English "her," for example), I have normalized the pronouns in accordance with Capgrave's own practices. Hence, in this edition, Modern English "her" is consistently written "hir," Modern English "their" is written "her," and Modern English "them" isLydgate, The Siege of Thebes: Prima Parshttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/thebfr1.htmFul yoor agon myd of Grekes lond; Which is a thing of poetes told, Nevere yseyn neither of yong nor old. But as Bochas list to specifie, Cler expownyng this derke poysye, Seith Mercurye, god of eloquence, Gaf be theThe Testament of Cresseidhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/testfram.htmNight's Dream. Fox (1981), p. 363, directs the reader to Oliver F. Emerson, "Legends of Cain, Especially in Old and Middle English," PMLA 21 (1906), 831-929, and Edmund Reiss, "Chaucer's Friar and the Man in the Moon," JEGP 62 (1963),Codex Ashmole 61: Item 32, Maidstone’s Seven Penitential Psalmshttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/sgas32frm.htmdarkness as those that have been dead of old. And my spirit is in anguish within me; my heart within me is troubled 109 Lines 828a–b: I remembered the days of old; I meditated on all thy works; I meditatedAthelston: Introductionhttp://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/athelint.htmMiddle English Romances." Medieval Studies 27 (1965), 91-116. [Discusses the "grammar" of romance: formal and literary conventions, social contexts, popular, non-courtly perspectives, and newly emergent bourgeois audience.] Pigg, Daniel. "The Implications of Realist Poetics in the Middle English Athelston." English