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Letter ReferenceOlive Schreiner BC16/Box5/Fold3/1914/80
ArchiveUniversity of Cape Town, Manuscripts & Archives, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 November 1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address ToThe Cottage, Ivy Deane, Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape
Who ToAlice Greene
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Manuscripts and Archives, University of Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscripts and Archives Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper, and the address it was sent to is provided by an attached envelope.
1Telephone: 3675 Kensington.
2Telegrams: Apartment, London. ^This is the cable adddress.^
3
4Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
5De Vere Gardens,
6W.
7
8My darling Friend
9
10 How is Betty? How are you both? I’ve not had a card for three weeks
11(then I had a beautiful long letter). The only thing I didn’t like
12about your beautiful, beautiful letter was that it said you were not
13coming to England. All life would be different to me if you & Betty
14were in this country. I had such a hope you would be here this winter,
15& either of you could always have a room in my tiny flat if you came
16to town. I know you & Betty would see many things as I see them if you
17only knew what I know. I am sending you Bernard Shaws latest. When you
18& Betty have read it send it on to Dot Schreiner if she’s still in
19Cape Town
20
21 There isn’t much I can tell you in a poor letter, but oh to talk
22with you. How lucky Lucys little girls are to have you with them all
23the time.
24
25 I went to see dear old Ghandi the other day: he looks very ill & weak.
26The damp & fog try him too. I am sending you a book called "Patriotism
27under three flags" it was written by Norman Angell about 10 years ago.
28When you’ve read it send it on to Cron. Have you read Norman Angells
29book "The Great Illusion"? If not, do. You will both like it Have you
30seen Bessie Reitz? I am still in the room where she left me. I am sure
31you will both love her. Try to see her. Her mother Mrs Reitz is such a
32charming woman.
33
34 Good bye
35 Olive
36
37^If ever you hear Cron is ill please cable to me I’ll pay for cable
38address ^
39 Address
40 Apartment
41 Kensing
42
Notation
The article and books referred to are: George Bernard Shaw (1914) 'Common Sense About the War' New Statesman 14 November (Special War Supplement), London: Statesman Publishing; Norman Angell (1903) Patriotism Under Three Flags London: T. Fisher Unwin; Norman Angell (1909) The Great Illusion London: William Heinemann.