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Letter ReferenceOlive Schreiner BC16/Box5/Fold3/1914/47
ArchiveUniversity of Cape Town, Manuscripts & Archives, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 11 August 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToWilliam Philip ('Will') Schreiner
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Manuscripts and Archives, University of Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Manuscripts and Archives Collections. The date of this letter has been written on in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident in St Mary Abbotts Terrace for some weeks during August and September 1914. The letter is written on the back of another letter, on the embossed headed notepaper of the Treasury.
1Tuesday
2
330 Mary Abbott’s Terrace
4
5My darling Will
6
7How are you? My heart is breaking over South Africa Oh if only I had
8never left it. I went to see Lloyd George this morning. I pointed out
9to him all war would mean for South Africa. I am writing to the Nation.
10
11Olive
12
13^I should never have left Africa. I have waited all these years till
14Cron should want me in his hour of need - & now I may not be there.
15
16Olive^
17
Notation
Frances Stevenson has signed the letter which Schreiner's letter is written on in her capacity as secretary to Lloyd George, as follows:

'Treasury Chambers
Whitehall SW
10/8/14.

Dear Madam,

Mr. Lloyd George wishes me to say that he hopes to be free at 10.25 tomorrow (Tuesday) morning, if you would care to call at the Treasury to see him.

Yours faithfully,
F.L. Stevenson'

Schreiner’s letters to her brother Will of 18 August and 15 September 1914 (Olive Schreiner BC16/Box5/Fold3/1914/48, and Olive Schreiner BC16/Box5/Fold3/1914/62) comment on what took place during Schreiner’s meeting with Lloyd George. No letter by Schreiner appeared in the Nation in August 1914.