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Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 October 1905
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident in Hanover from September 1900 to October 1907, after 1902 with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere. The start of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3 could have pained her, I might think it was that, but it can't be.
4Perhaps she is pained by my objecting to the killing at Johannesburg
5but I hardly think she could be so narrow. I have not mentioned the
6strike or anything connected with it to her. Of course likely she is
7just too busy to find a moment to spare, especially as her nurse has
8left her to get married. If you do meet her write & tell me. No one
9has mentioned her name since her return & that makes me fear she has
10been ill, & is not going out.
11
12 I fancy Margaretha will be of a very artistic turn - I don't think
13William will be! - he will be a man of action; & Walter a student.
14Dear Walter, I think he grows sweeter & sweeter as he grows older.
15
16 Cron is very busy with his golf playing every afternoon. They have a
17big match with three other towns on next Monday.
18
19 Thine ever
20 Olive
21
22

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.9
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1907
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Content indicates that the letter was written while Schreiner was in Cape Town. Schreiner stayed in Cape Town from mid June to mid September 1907. The end of the letter is missing.
1 My darling Anna
2
3 I think the meeting went off well. But I don't know why any one needed
4to say you wouldn't do as well as secretary as Mrs Hall, because no
5one is quite like you. You are so wonderful in your quiet power of
6getting things done, & better than other people do them with much more
7fuss. You are a genius. I'm not trying to flatter you, dear. But I've
8seen & known so many people in my life, but no one with quite your
9gifts & powers. You are like Miss Molteno & Miss Greene, always
10unfolding & developing. You will be grand when you are old. I wish I
11could live to see then Little Margaretha will.
12
13 I'm so glad you like Mrs Haldane Murray so much. I am so wonderfully
14drawn to her. Minnie De Villiers too is a fine woman & she
15
16[page/s missing]
17

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.11
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Tuesday May 1910 ; Before End: June 1910
Address FromIrene, Pretoria, Transvaal
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter was misdated by an unknown hand as 26 August 1902. Content shows Schreiner was staying wih Jan and Isie Smuts at Irene and it mentions her violets in De Aar, to which she moved only in October 1907. She visited Pretoria and stayed with the Smuts in late May or early June 1910, thus the dating of the letter.
1 Irene
2 Tuesday
3
4 Darling
5
6 General Hertzog spent last evening here He is a dear good old fellow;
7whether one sees eye to eye with him or not one must love him.
8
9 I see so many children but I see none quite like Margaretha. That
10wonderful F mixture of refinement & strength in the little soul.
11
12 I suppose the time at Caledon will be good. I wonder whether ^when^ I
13shall see you again. I don't think I shall go down to Cape Town this
14summer. I wish we could plan to go somewhere together.
15
16 I see no violets even in Pretoria so fine as ours at De Aar.
17
18 Thine ever
19 Olive
20
21 I shall be home by Saturday.
22

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.12
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 July 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was in De Aar from mid June to late November 1910.
1July 31st 1910
2
3My darling Anna
4
5 I am so glad to hear your beautiful, beautiful news. I hope the
6beloved little one when it comes will be a boy - for Walters sake.
7Margaretha will be what she will be, her character is very strong, but
8Walter might be spoiled if he grew up the only son in the family. It
9will be so good for him to have a brother. I love little baby girls
10with a peculiar tenderness - but its so sad to bring a woman into the
11world, till better times come. You can shield her during her childhood
12- but what then? Oh my darling, I am so glad any how . People like you
13& your husband are sure to have desirable children. Both Walter & my
14little Margaretha are charming each in their own way. I hope you are
15feeling well. You must not have anything to worry you.
16
17 I am thinking always of my darling Adela. If only the child lives that
18she has gone through such terrible suffering for. When do you think it
19will come to you? I'm so glad you've had that nice little change in
20Caledon.
21
22 I have just been reading an article by Upton Sinclair, about how he
23cured himself by fasting for ten & twelve days at a time. I'm going to
24begin on Monday morning & try till Thursday night - unless I faint. He
25says you ought to eat nothing but drink much water. I can't drink
26
27^the terrible bitter de Aar water, so I'm going to take the strained
28wey of my sour Kaffir milk. I'll write & tell you the results. The
29article is in the April no of the Contemporary Review. Cron went up to
30Kimberley this week to see the English football team & now he's away
31at Laingsburg at a political meeting. Arriet is lost she went out the
32day before yesterday & has not come back. I fear so she is killed.
33
34 Olive^
35
Notation
The article by Upton Sinclair concerned the health benefits of lengthy fasting; see Upton Sinclair 'Perfect Health' The Contemporary Review April 1910, pp.429-40; a follow-up letter around responses to it appeared in the September issue: 'On fasting: A letter to the editor' The Contemporary Review September 1910, pp.380-4.

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.13
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateJuly 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 230
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year of this letter have been written on in an unknown hand Content shows that Schreiner was in De Aar when it was written. She was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 Anna darling
2
3 I am sending you a little pamphlet Mrs Rhys David, a friend of mine
4has sent me as I know you are interested in Buddhism. She is
5publishing a book on these old Buddhist women & wants to dedicate it
6to me, which I shall feel a great compliment. I sympathize with
7Buddhism more than any form of religion, & she herself is such a noble
8big warm hearted woman in spirit. He husband is the most important
9Buddhist authority in Europe & she has also a great European
10reputation. It's so beautiful that they can share each others work.
11Thats to me the highest ideal of marriage, at least to be able to help
12each other in reaching the most important things in life.
13
14 ^How does my little girl flourish? We mustn't always teach her she's a
15little girl. She'll find that out soon enough when she grows older;
16let her just be a little human being. I'm not well dear or I would
17write more
18
19 Olive
20
21 Cron is busy making a big garden. I am planning some flowers. Could
22you send me up a few little violet plants. I would like to have a
23little row of Bergvleit violets before my bedroom door I'll pay the
24carriage^
25
Notation
The book referred to is: Caroline Augusta Rhys David (1912) Buddhism: A Study of the Buddhist Norm London: Williams & Norgate; however, in the event it was not dedicated to Schreiner. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.14
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date22 December 1915
Address FromLondon
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is written on embossed headed notepaper and ‘The Visitors’ Room’ is the paper Schreiner is using rather than where the letter is ‘from’. She was resident at St Mary Abbotts Terrace during December 1915.
1 The Visitors' Room
2 Barkers
3 Kensington
4 Dec 22nd 1915
5
6 Dear Anna
7
8 I am waiting here for a friend, & am going to give the time to one
9word of love to you. Dear you'll never know all you've been to me. How
10I treasure the beautiful memory of all your love & kindness to me. I
11wonder if we shall ever meet again. It seems likely not but life holds
12many things. It's a damp foggy rainy day, but oh so much better than
13the warmth. As soon as the thermometer gets over 60 I can't do
14anything.
15
16 Oliver is home for a few days, so changed one would hardly know him.
17The two girls are home too, & & are perhaps going to nurse in
18
19 ^Egypt
20
21 Good bye my darling Anna
22 Olive^
23
24 Address to Standard Bank
25

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/1.15
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1915 ; Before End: 1916
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year range has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The poem referred to cannot be established.
1 Darling Anna
2
3 I am enclosing a little poem to you. Its the only really good thing
4I've seen written since upon the war. It seems to come from my own
5heart. Its not the actual killing & death that is so awful in war as
6the hate that breathes through human hearts & makes us forget that
7humanity is one.
8
9 Miss Greene told me about your lovely picnic. If I could just be with
10you all for a few hours. I'm not getting any better dear I'm getting
11steadily worse; but don't say this to Cron if you see him any time.
12Its that I don't want the burden of my illness to rest on him, that
13makes me stay here. I should only be a trouble to you all in Africa.
14Here I trouble no one & there are always nursing homes one can go to.
15Sometimes I think if Miss Molteno & Miss Greene were in England I
16might hire their little cottage, but its only a dream. Is it in a tiny
17place? What is the use of my being in Africa if I can't be near Cron:
18& in De Aar I can't live.
19
20 I just live from day to day, determined not to think if the war is
21over soon I can try Nauheim again perhaps.
22
23 Good bye dear one.
24
25 Yours always with tender love & grateful for all your goodness to me,
26my beloved Anna
27 Olive
28
29 Show the poem to Miss Molteno & ask her to send it back to me.
30

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/2.18
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateOctober 1919
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 My own darling Anna,
2
3 Oh if I could be with you. If I could be a little comfort & help to
4you! I cant think his dear face is gone from Bergvleit forever. I've
5just heard the news from Dr Brown.
6
7 Oh darling, when you are able, write to me & tell me about yourself. I
8am so thankful Walter is with you.
9
10 Oh Anna I know the blow has been too terrible, & one can't do anything
11for only know how I'm loving you all the time, & thinking of you. Is
12your mother with you? How is Joey?
13
14 You & my dear little sister-in-law will be drawn to each other. She
15has felt her loss terribly. Oh I long to be at the Cape with you all
16
17 Olive
18

Letter Reference Anna Purcell MSB 386/2.19
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 March 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 March 24th 1920
2
3 My darling Anna
4
5 I can't wish you many happy returns of this day. It will be a sad one
6for you, & yet it will be full of beautiful memories. Oh Anna, I can't
7think that if ever I come out to South Africa I shall not see that
8dear beautiful face again. He was the finest man, take him for all in
9all, we had in South Africa. I cant realize he is really gone.
10
11 Thank Walter for his long interesting letter. How good it is you have
12him. Oliver's wife has a most beautiful baby girl called Jean Frances.
13The both is doing well but Edna has much trying swellings in her left
14breast, & I am anxious about her. She is a most loveable fascinating
15person.
16
17 Good bye my own beloved friend.
18 Olive
19
20 I hear Lord Lytton is going out to the Cape as Governor, I don't know
21if its true
22
23 I am expecting Ruth Alexander next week. What a joy it will be to me.
24

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 May 1896
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 274-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident in Kimberley from early August 1894 to November 1898, with visits, sometimes extended, elsewhere over this period.
1 May 5 / 96
2
3 Dear Mr Merriman
4
5 Thank you for your letter. I should like to answer at length your
6interesting criticisms, but must not to-day. I can only tell you how
7entirely my sympathies will be with you when you bring in your motion
8on the 12th. We who know how colossal is the evil which threatens
9South Africa to-day must stand shoulder to shoulder if we are to break
10its power. It must be a long pull, & a strong pull & a pull all
11together, if we are to succeed. I cannot believe that dear old Innes
12will be found in the other camp ultimately. Try & keep him. He has
13more respect for your judgment than for that of any man in South
14Africa; it will be very ill for the country if you two should be
15divided. I can do nothing in this country, but if I could do any thing
16by writing Home let me know.
17
18 Whatever comes or does not come I hope we shall see you installed as
19Minister of Public Works in any ministry that may be formed. As ^a^ I
20rule, I hold & have long held, that situated as this country is, the
21best & most advanced men should refuse to take office, & that they
22would serve the country best as a resolute & unpurchasable opposition
23- but circumstances are so exceptionalble now that I should almost say,
24 take the post of Minister of Works at all hazards. We absolutely must
25have a straight, strong man there: this country is rotten.
26
27 Yours sincerely
28 Olive Schreiner
29
30 You ask why the Boer is more hide bound than the Basques or Welsh? Do
31you not think that, the difference lies in this fact, that these
32peoples were little complete nations shut up & compressed, as it were,
33^but^ from the ?Baron & the King downwards all parts of the nation were
34there when they were forced back into their valleys & shut up among
35themselves! - the Boers were a section of a nations, not cut down
36vertically & having representatives among them of all classes; but cut
37out horizontally, & representing only the labouring & lower middle
38class! This I think accounts for most of their peculiarities.
39Something analogous gives its very peculiar tone to English Colonial
40life. Yo We are not a section of the English people "cut straight
41down" & transported to South Africa. The highest & the lowest, the
42aristocracy of intellect & culture, & the working-classes are not
43adequately represented here. The dissenting lower middle-class, with
44its peculiar virtues & vices predominates & gives to South African
45English life its very peculiar ^lower middle class tone!^
46
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 May 1896
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 278-9
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 The Homestead
2 May 25 / 96
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 Thank you for your letter. Your speech was without any doubt the most
7brilliant & powerful that has been made in the Cape Parliament - but
8?this ^is^ not a time of day in South Africa when any speech, reason, or
9argument, counts: - it is the day of money.
10
11I hope, how profoundly I can hardly say, that you, Sauer & Innes will
12yet, before very long be found on one side, & in one camp.
13
14There are two & only two questions in South Africa, the native
15question, & the question - Shall the whole land fall into the hands of
16a knot of Capitalists. The Dutch & English question, as you have
17yourself said, is nothing - in fifty years it will not be. But the
18native question & the capitalist question ^are in^ their infancy now,
19will loom right over the land in fifty years time, & unless some
20mighty change set in, will deluge the land with blood.
21
22 We who hold that rank confers duties, that a course of stern
23unremitting justice is demanded from us towards the native, & that
24only in as far as we are able to raise him & bind him to ourselves
25with indissoluble bonds of sympathy & gratitude, can the future of
26South Africa be anything but an earthly Hell: - we who hold this have
27no right to let anything divide us. He that is not with us is against
28us; he that gathereth not with us scattereth abroad. How-ever great be
29our personal antipathies & our personal wrongs, there are some matters
30so great that in their light all personal divisions should fade away.
31
32 Neither you nor Sauer can ever ultimately work with the bond! It is
33beginning to become clear to me that if Rhodes ever comes back to
34power, it will be partly by the aid of his money, but mainly through
35the Bond; he will regain his power over the retrogressive element in
36the country by throwing the native to them to be torn in pieces.
37
38 For the Boers as a whole I have the the most intense personal sympathy
39& admiration. For five years in my early girl-hood I was a teacher
40among ^them^, & I know them as perhaps few, I might say, no, cultured
41Englishman in South Africa, knows them - & I love them. Their love for
42personal liberty - for themselves - is to me little short of being
43divine - but on the native question we have to fight the main body of
44them to the death for the next 20 years.
45
46 Yes, they have had no Job; but they have had no language in which a
47Job could express his thoughts! Has Australia had a Job or America
48even? The greatest American, Emerson, is even not quite a Job! In
49Burgers they have produced certainly the most genius-ful man South
50Africa has seen. I love the Boer - let us deal justly, generously by
51him as by the native: but let us not give one inch to his cardinal
52vice.
53
54 Yours sincerely
55 Olive Schreiner
56
57 ^Will not this parliamentary inquiry be a hideous farce? I look now
58with hope only to one curious quarter - the Hollanders in the
59Transvaal! They will not give in.^
60
61
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 June 1896
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 284-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 The Homestead
2 June 29 / 96
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I am very glad you liked my Bushman paper. I have never gone on with
7the letter I was writing in answer to your last, because we have had
8visitors staying with us ever since, & as I do all the cooking &
9housework, with the help of a little boy of 14, I have not been to my
10desk since.
11
12Your remark with regard to the attitude of the Boers towards some of
13their old favourite Halfcaste servants is so very true. I have been
14struck by the fact on some farms I have ^been^ lived on, that, while the
15Kaffirs, who seem to me such a much more noble folk, are treated with
16scorn & severity, the Half-caste servants, or some of them, are petted
17& spoiled. Does not this rise partly from the fact that blood is
18thicker than water?? In one family I was struck by the way in which an
19old ^coloured^ woman of 70 & her daughter of 40 seemed to dominate &
20govern the mistress & the house. I found out afterwards that the old
21woman had actually born several children to the ^grand^ father in the
22old slave times ^& later after she was freed^ & that the daughter of 40
23was actually own half sister to the mistress of the house! In many
24cases where there is of course no personal relation between the
25masters family ^& the coloured servants^ there is still a racial
26connection
. I think this accounts for the fact that had before ^I
27thought of it^ often puzzled me - that English men in the Eastern
28province where there are both Kaffirs & Halfcaste always prefer the
29Kaffirs, while Boers almost always prefer the Halfcastes. Might this
30also not explain a little, why there are cases on record of white
31girls running away with Halfcasts & seldom or never with Kaffirs? ^- as
32you mentioned in your last.^
33
34 //I do not think I over state the the painful position of the
35Halfcaste, though on the surface it certainly does appear so. I could
36recount to you if there were time, severa1 ?instances in which
37coloured women have poured out a flood of bitterness at their position,
38 when a few words of indirect sympathy had once showed them that I
39felt kindly towards them. I know ^also^ one highly cultured &
40intellectual woman, in a good social position who has one 8th of
41Hottentot blood. I have She has declared unreadable that if she had
42had any conception of what her children would have had to go through
43she would never have given one of them birth. Her hatred towards her
44grand father for the misery he has caused his des-cendants is
45something almost savage! She certainly is the only wom person in the
46upper ranks of life, who has ever spoken frankly to me of their
47position; but I have not the slightest doubt that thousands who do not
48speak, feel just as bitterly. There is a very delightful & fine
49coloured family ^who^ live next door to us here; the husband is a cab
50driver. The other day when I was kissing & nursing the baby the ^woman^
51burst forth ?most unexpectedly; "Yes, I wonder that you kiss the child!
52 Most white people wouldn't touch it, because it's skin is a little
53darker than theirs!" &c &c &c.
54
55 //I don't know why the Bushman must die: they have kept alive a
56variety of the original wild cattle of Europe in a certain Park in
57England! There is no reason the Bushman should perish, if a
58millionaire bought unreadable up thirty or forty large farms, fenced
59them, & stocked them with wild beast, or rather let them simply run, &
60left the Bushman at peace in the territory, not trying to civilize
61them. It certainly won't be done, but it certainly might be.
62
63 Yes, you are quite right. I have not dealt adequately with the Boer
64woman in the two articles I sent you, but the next article is called
65"The Boer Woman", & entirely devoted to her, ^though^ & incidentally ^it
66deals with^ to the woman question, as I conceive it. I shall be
67exceeding interested to find out what you think of that article.
68
69 My husband leaves on Friday for Cradock to read his paper.
70
71 I am exceedingly depressed about political & public affairs in this
72country To you who are more behind the scenes it may seem ridiculous,
73but I am continually haunted by the dread that Rhodes & his backers in
74high circles at home whi will yet plunge South Africa in war. It seems
75to me his last card. If he fails in that he is done for.
76
77 Yours sincerely
78 Olive Schreiner
79
80 ^No, I have never read Stevenson, strange as it may seem I have a most
81peculiar antipathy to novels. I love the Mill on the Floss and
82Turgannieffs Fathers & Sons & a dozen others, but I think I like them
83because they are science or poetry, not because they are novels!!! I
84have often tried to analyze why it is that th I have this intense
85horror of ordinary novels, while the all folks of this age from Huxley
86& Darwin to servant girls find pleasure in them, & benefit too. They
87are so dry
!^
88
Notation
The 'Bushman paper' and 'The Boer Woman' are among the essays initially published pseudonymously from 1891 on as by 'A Returned South African', intended for publication in book form as 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa'. However, although prepared for publication, a dispute with a US publisher and the events of the South African War prevented this. They and some related essays were posthumously published as Thoughts on South Africa. The books referred to are: George Eliot (1878) The Mill on the Floss Edinburgh: Blackwood; Ivan Turgenieff (1867) Fathers and Sons Thomas New York: Y. Crowell & Co. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday June 1896
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 283-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content. Schreiner was resident in Kimberley from early August 1894 to November 1898, with visits, sometimes lengthy, elsewhere over this period.
1 Sunday morning
2
3 Dear Mr Merriman
4
5 Thank you for your. There are a dozen things in it that I want to
6refer to. To-day I shall only answer it by sending you a bit of my
7next article, the one that I have just sent off to England & which is
8to appear in August in the Fortnightly. Please return it to me as its
9the only corrected copy I have & I have to copy it for the Diggers News
10& other news papers. It will show you what I feel for about our
11Bushmen.
12
13 What you say Mr Scott told you interests me more than you can perhaps
14understand as it bears on the theory of development of sex relations,
15which I have been working at for many years. N In such a state of
16absolutely primitive social organization as that of the Bushman there
17can of course be no slavery of the female or organized polygamy (which
18is much the same thing!) But, I was inclined to believe that that
19though woman's subjection was only accomplished when the next stage
20was entered on, & was largely connected, though not always, with the
21introduction of agricultural labour; that, ^in the primitive stage^
22though sex relations were equal & the ^woman^ free, they ought must be
23of a temporary nature! Would it be possible to get that Mr Scott to
24write what he knows, & to give his exact grounds for forming his
25opinion? It would be very valuable. There can be no real affection &
26organic mental union between the male & female except in a monogamic
27condition; &, unreadable where ^human^ females are free there never will
28be a pob polygamous condition; (though there may in very exceptional
29cases be polyandry): but I have been inclined inclined to think this
30was generally the line of human progress.
31
321
33Primitive state a loose monogamy, in which one female mated with one
34male, perhaps only for a short time.

35
362
37
38Savage State - From which modern societies are only beginning
39
40The boy is waiting to fetch for the letters. I will finish another day
41- but I am anxious you should see what I have said of the Bushman.
42
43 Yours faithfully
44 Olive Schreiner
45
46 ^Please do not show the MS I send to any one, & return it when done with.^
47
Notation
Schreiner's 'The problem of slavery' appeared in the Fortnightly Review in August 1896 as part of an extended publication on "The Boer". See: "Prefatory note: Stray Thoughts on South Africa" Fortnightly Review April 1896, vol 59, pp.510; "Stray Thoughts on South Africa: The Boer" Fortnightly Review April 1896, vol 59, pp.510-540; "Stray Thoughts on South Africa: The Boer (Continued from April Number.)" Fortnightly Review July 1896, vol 60, pp.1-35; and "Stray Thoughts on South Africa: The Boer (Continued from July Number.)" Fortnightly Review August 1896, vol 60, pp.225-256. Together with a number of essays originally published pseudonymously from 1891 on as by 'A Returned South African', it was intended for publication in book form as "Stray Thoughts on South Africa". However, although prepared for publication, a dispute with a US publisher and the events of the South African War (1899-1902) prevented this. They and some related essays were posthumously published as Thoughts on South Africa. This composite article on "The Boer", however, contains more than the present essay of that title in Thoughts on South Africa. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday September 1897
Address FromHighstead, Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 313-14
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content. Schreiner stayed in Cape Town for part of September 1897 following her arrival from Britain, then left for Matjesfontein and Hopetown en route for Kimberley.
1Highstead
2Rondebosch
3Tuesday
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman
6
7 I got your note last night. It was very good of you & Mrs Merriman to
8ask us to come, & we should have been delighted to do so, but I have
9been sent out again by the doctors on account of my health & am not
10better since I got here, so we are going up to the Karroo tomorrow. We
11are going to break the journey at Matjesfontein & again at Hope Town
12where I shall stay for some days or weeks till I am fit to go on to
13Kimberley If you should by any chance be writing to me address K to
14Hope Town, care Mrs Wright.
15
16 It would have been a very great pleasure to me to come have a talk
17with you on South African matters. To me matters seem more hopeless
18than when I left, not on the surface but essentially.
19
20 One thing I should like to say to you - Don't "stand off" or miss any
21opportunity that offers of meeting & entering into personal relations
22with the new Governor; He may not be the man we should have chosen,
23but it will be a terrible thing if the better class of men stand back
24& leave him to fall entirely into the hands of the Sievewright & Co
25set. You unreadable I think more than any other person in South Africa
26might have a beneficial influence on him. I am very sorry to to have
27had the pleasure of accepting your invitation
28
29 Yours sincerely
30 Olive Schreiner
31
32 I have been much amused ^to^ hear that some people here have taken quite
33seriously the Rhodesian statement that my book Peter Halket was paid
34for by the Transvaal Government. Just fancy Oom Paul & ^his^ fellow
35Transvaalers approving of a book which inculcates that it may be your
36duty to love a nigger!!!
37
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date21 November 1897
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 317-18
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident in Kimberley from early August 1894 to November 1898, with visits, sometimes extended, elsewhere over this period.
1 Nov 21st 1897
2
3 Dear Mr Merriman
4
5 If we could only get all the people to bear witness in court to what
6they know & tell us in private, the matter would be ended at once. Two
7or three are willing to, & if they stand by their word in court I
8think we must win.
9
10 It seems in 1881 or 1882 old Cornwall got a great wigging in the
11supreme court for influencing votes unduly in an electric light case;
12we are going to get the lawyers to look up the case. That ought to
13tell some what against him. But you who have never lived in Kimberley
14can have no idea what the terrorism of Rhodes & De Beers is here.
15
16 People close all the doors & examine the country round carefully
17before they sit down to talk to you. It is worse than Russia. If it
18were only possible for one of the Barkly West cases to be taken up at
19the same time it would tell heavily against Rhodes & De Beers!
20
21 Brown, Rhode's agent from Kenilworth, who has been out to water
22auriferously the electoral field of Barkly West, previous to Mr Rhodes
23arrival, lost, out of his cart as he was returning to Kimberley, a bag
24containing £400 in gold. What must that bag have contained when he set
25out?? What is the law with regard to political bribery in this
26country? Is there any one Blue Book or Act ^&c^ I could get which would
27give it one exactly? I what my husband to write a pamphlet on it like
28our "Political Situation" of three years ago? If you know please tell
29me, & where to send for them.
30
31 There must either be something hopelessly wrong with our law here; or
32with its administration that such absolutely bare faced corruption can
33go on, uncommented on. I have seen a great deal of practical election
34work in England during the 10 years I lived there. There is a great
35deal too much giving to tea-parties to working men (but the working
36men see through it!) & there is a disgrace-ful amount of giving
37subscriptions to public works, churches & gardens &c in a members
38division (which ought to be made illegal) but anything like the calm,
39cynical, open purchase which goes on in this country would be
40absolutely impossible there. Why is this?
41
42 I am sending you a copy of the Progressive Review with an article on
43"payment of constituents" which is profoundly true I think. There is
44rather an interesting article on Nature & Realism in Art, by one of my
45dearest friends, & a not profound but true article on the South
46African Committee's report. Don't return it. It's much the best review
47now existing in England but as far as I know no one takes it in this
48country.
49
50 Yours faithfully
51 Olive Schreiner
52
53 I don't agree with you that the farmer & owner of land hold of
54necessity any higher view of social duty than the man who sells
55dry-goods. It is the fixing of his heart in the material things of
56life which destroys high social feeling in farmer who makes bad brandy
57as well as the merchant who sells bad shoes. "Children how hardly
58shall they that have riches (or thirst after them!) enter the Kingdom
59of God." The pure speculation, of course, is a ^more social disease, a
60spiritual smallpox.^
61
62 ^PS. I am leaving by tonight's mail train for Cape Town. To see about
63this business I shall probably be there one day but may have to stay
64longer.^
65
Notation
The Progressive Review article on the payment of constituents has not been traced.The article on nature and realism in art was by Schreiner's friend Edward Carpenter. See: Edward Carpenter "Wagner, Millet and Whitman: In Relation to Art and Democracy" Progressive Review vol 1, no 1, October 1896 pp.63-74. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1898
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to the Kiplings visiting the Merriman farm, because after 1898 Merriman rejected what he perceived as Kipling’s extreme imperialism and was less friendly with him. The beginning of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3 ^news^ of that ?meeting in another 50 years. It was our first, but not
4our last victory. The big fight will probably come off in America or
5Germany.
6
7 Both the Kiplings were enthusiastic about your place at Stellenbosch.
8Say it is without any exception the loveliest place they have seen in
9South Africa.
10

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/9
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1896 ; Before End: 1898
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to content concerning when the 'committee at Home' was held regarding the Jameson Raid and linked matters concerning the role of the Rhodes controlled Chartered Company in Mashonaland. The start of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3 committee at Home. I enclose a paper copied from one he sent me
4stating some of the things he had seen. He has property in Natal
5Mashonaland; but he will only loose it all if it is know he is going
6to give evidence, but if he can arrange it he would be willing to go
7home, if his expenses were paid. I can't pay them for him, but do you
8not think Sauer could arrange with some of the committee to have his
9expenses ^Wh ?If I wrote ?signed to him?^ Would it be any use sending
10this paper to Sauer, or is there any one else in England to whom you
11would advise my sending it?
12
13 Please show to no one the enclosed, & return to me unless you think
14the matter worth arranging yourself I am writing to Nelson a English
15MP to see what he can do in the matter, but want to have more than one
16iron in the fire.
17
18 Yours sincerely
19 Olive Schreiner
20

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1897:17
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 April 1897
Address FromGrand Hotel, Alassio, Italy
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 307-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Grand Hotel
2 Alassio
3 Riviera
4 Italy
5 April 3rd 1897
6
7 Dear Mr Merriman
8
9 I have just got your letter of March 1st. I am indeed glad of your
10opinion of Peter Halket.
11
12 I should have long ago have written to you but have been unable since
13we left England. We tried Rome Naples & the beautiful Amalfi, but the
14doctors ordered me to return here, & I am getting fit; though not yet
15able to work - & that is all I care for. I had so wished to revise the
16two last articles of the Stray Thoughts which I had hoped might be of
17a little use if published just now. But I must wait.
18
19 With regard to Chamberlains attitude. There may be much in what you
20say. There is no doubt he hates Rhodes, but there is no doubt also
21that Chamberlain is a man who will always do what is best for himself
22"with a single eye to his own interests." - At the same time I have it
23on good authority, (you would recognize it to be such if I could
24mention the name of my informant) that Chamberlain is only going "to
25play down to Rhodes for the present to strike him at the end of the
26inquiry."
27
28 Yes, I realize how nobly you have stood, & how fearlessly you have
29spoken; my fear is that you may get weary of it. That you may say, "I
30have lost my following & much of my influence" - & that the devil may
31appear to you in the only form he ever dares assume to a good man,
32saying, "For the sake of re-acquiring your large influence for good!,
33had you not better just tone down a little & keep quiet, &c &c" It is
34such a terrible thing to stand alone that the bravest soul may be
35forgiven if the thought flashes on it a moments - "If I am in the
36right path why am I walking on it alone, why have I no fellow
37travellers." On the whole I suppose in all the rest of your life you
38never did anything like such valuable work, nor produced such large
39effects as during the last fifteen months. What would it have been if
40there had not been your voice during this time??
41
42 Yes, I have no doubt Rhodes Sievewright has a hold on Rhodes! There
43must be many men who have. Rhodes's career will probably come to an
44end forever, when one of his confederates in evil is so filled with
45anger that he refuses to be bought & speaks the truth. Did I tell you
46how we came upon Rhodes & Jameson, having lunch at the Zoo when we
47were in London: & again we my husband met Rhodes & Maguire at ^in^ the
48?coliseum at Rome? Curious we should always be coming across him.
49
50 There is one point I hope you & Sauer & Innes will keep in mind, &
51that is that Rhodes is a coward.
52
53 If you are going to handle him with kid gloves, we he may return to
54the Cape Parliament. If you ^three^ are going to fight straight from the
55shoulder he dare never show his face there. I believe if only one of
56you stood firm, he would not dare.
57
58 But after all - the old sorrow comes back again. We fight Rhodes
59because he means so much of oppression, injustice, & moral degradation
60to South Africa; - but if he passed away tomorrow there still remains
61the terrible fact that something in our society has formed the matrix
62which has fed, nourished, & built up such a man! It is the far future
63of Africa during the next twenty-five or fifty years which depresses
64me. I believe we are standing on the top of a long down-ward slope. We
65shall reach the bottom at last, probably amid the of a war with our
66native races (then not the poor savage but generous races whom we
67might have bound to ourselves by a little generosity & sympathy - but
68a fierce & half educate much brutalized race, who will have their own).
69 I see always that day fifty or sixty years hence; & it is with
70reference to it that I judge of many things in the present. The men to
71come after us will reap the fruits of our "native policy", as we today
72in a smaller fashion are reaping the fruits of the "Dutch Policy" of
73sixty years ago. One tenth of the consideration that the Dutch have
74wrung from us during the last 15 years, yielded them from motive of
75humanity & with sympathy & respect, would have blended us into one
76people emotionally long ago.
77
78 I shall make all inquiries about literature with regard to Touss-ant
79L'ouverture
when I am in Paris next month. I myself have long been
80anxious to learn more of him. I have also written to a friend in
81London Havelock Ellis who is an Encyclopaedia on European literature,
82to hear if he knows of anything.
83
84 I do hope you will see some way of all acting together out there. Even
85if it g

86
87 Yours very sincerely,
88 Olive Schreiner
89
90 Did you see my husband's little paper in the Progressive Review.
91
Notation
The two articles Schreiner refers to are part of a group initially published pseudonymously from 1891 on as by 'A Returned South African' intended for publication in book form as 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa'. However, although prepared for publication, a dispute with a US publisher and the events of the South African War prevented this. They and some related essays were posthumously published as Thoughts on South Africa. Schreiner would have 'made all inquiries' regarding books about Toussaint Louverture, rather than by him. For Cronwright-Schreiner's article, see: S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner "Notes on South Africa" Progressive Review vol 1, no 6, March 1897 pp.542-547. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1897:57
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 December 1897
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 319-21
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 The Homestead
2 Kimberley
3 Dec 5 / 97
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman
6
7 Yes, we must lose the case & pay costs & damages. But does that or can
8that make any difference? If a man believes a thing that he has said
9to be true, is not the path before him simple & straight, to hold
10simply & & quietly by what he has said & let the law take its course?
11If he had to die for it would he yet have any alternative? I know in
12your heart that you know he has not; & that in your own case you would
13stand to the truth which you had once uttered. In our case it will not
14be a matter of death but only if they give the damages asked for, of
15taking pretty well everything we have in the world, but that makes no
16difference, we shall pay it & be happy. My bitter sorrow is that we
17may strengthen instead of weakening the all crushing hand of de Beers:
18that does pain me nothing else. If it were possible for my husband
19because of the prospect of material loss & suffering to withdraw one
20word which he believed to be true, I could not live with him: but it
21would be as absolutely impossible for him to do so as for any man I
22know.
23
24 It is such a merciful thing that however complex life may be in some
25ways, the right path for a man to follow at any given moment is always
26open right straight ahead of him, & that what its end may be in
27consequences to ourselves does not concern us.
28
29 It always seems to me curious that people think the answer to the
30question "What is truth?" so mysterious & difficult to get at To me it
31seems so simple. Truth for each man is that which intellectually he is
32compelled to believe, whether it deals with religion or science or the
33matters of every day life! And recantation is equally a unreadable
34denial of God, whether it concern a religious dogma or a part of daily
35life. I think one has always or often the right to remain silent, & to
36resent keenly the attempt of anyone who tries to compel you to speak
37when you don't wish to. But if one does speak, it must be the Truth. I
38always feels such sorrow that when Galileo stood before the
39inquisitors he didn't say simply, "The world turns." There is one star
40wanting in the firmament of human life for ever. But one shouldn't be
41too hard in judging another; it's a hard thing to leave the blessed
42light of the sun; & no man knows whether he could do it till he's
43tried.
44
45 I was surprised to find that my dear old brother did understand our
46stand point, though the lawyer in him might think it a bit Quixotic
47You see no law nor quids or quirks can change the simple fact that
48when a man thinks a thing - (It may have been very unwise of him to
49say it) - that when once he has said it, he can never say he doesn't
50believe it. There's no way out.
51
52 I was sorry to see dear old Innes looking so ill. He is having a hard
53fight, & many of the men he has to work with are as false as they can
54be. He is a white soul; though one can't see eye to eye with him.
55
56 De Beers influence has made Cornwall Mayor of Kimberley today.
57
58 Do you know what I always think of when I feel quite hopeless about
59South Africa & the justice of life? - Doornkop! & those simple farmers
60beating in open daylight the troops of Rothschild ^&^ Rhodes! The Lord
61yet reigneth, let the earth rejoice!
62
63 Our case comes on the day after tomorrow.
64
65 Yours sincerely
66 Olive Schreiner
67
68 I am re-reading Bancrofts History of the United States, which I read
69last when I was fourteen. How curiously like our old Boers the
70Virginians were, according to his des-cription of them Their ^great^
71rebellion of 1676 was reminds one curiously of the Trans-vaal war - &
72it was among these people that fifty years later George Washington was
73born!
74
Notation
The book referred to is: George Bancroft (1853) History of the United States From the Discovery of the American Continent London: George Routledge. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/71/4/5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date17 December 1897
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 323-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 The Homestead,
2 December 17 / 97
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I am as sick of the word progressive as you can be; as sick as a sheep
7would feel at the sight of wool, if under half the fleeces they saw
8moving about them, there peered out a wolf's head.
9
10 But weary as one feels of this rotten assumption of names that mean
11nothing, there are in South Africa a body men & women who might be
12drawn together into a small compact & therefore powerful party, were
13there anyone to organise & lead them. But we are scattered abroad as
14sheep having no shepherd. A little sign, I take it, of the way people
15will support & stand by anyone who takes a decided stand against
16Rhodes & the monopolist party he represents, is the fact that though
17my husband failed in his case, people, many of them people we do not
18know & have never seen have sent us in cheques or offered a sum
19amounting ^altogether^ to £985 (a thousand all but £25) asking to be
20allowed to contribute to the damages & cost of the case as they felt
21the matter was not a personal one, & the expense should be borne by
22the public.
23
24 Of course we have declined all offers of help. But does this not show
25there is a strong feeling under the surface, though it will not be
26called forth by half measures.
27
28 I do hope you are quite sound on the Diamond tax! Do you know who
29wrote that excellent letter in the Argus of the 14th signed A Liberal,
30an answer to Jagger? There was a whole hearted outspoken-ness about it
31that is rare in the utterances of so-called progressives.
32
33 Yours very sincerely
34 Olive Schreiner
35
36 Do you remember that lovely passage in Plato, "Those who have also
37seen & been satisfied of the madness of the multi-tude, & know that
38there is no one who ever acts honestly in the admin-istration of
39states, nor any helper who will save any one who main-tains the cause
40of the just. Such a saviour would be like a man who has fallen among
41wild beasts being unable to join in the wickedness of his friends, &
42would have to throw away his life before he had done any good to
43himself or others. And he reflects on this & holds his peace, & does
44his own business. He is like one who retires under the shelter of a
45wall in the storm of dust & sleet, which the driving wind hurries
46along - he is content if he can live his own life & depart in peace
47with bright hopes."
48
49 One is often minded of this passage now a days! And yet by each man
50doing his tiny best in his tiny place, humanity does grow slowly &
51slowly onwards.
52
53 I hope there is not the slightest chance of the machination of your
54foes unseating you. I do not think such a ^dis-grace could be-fall
55South Africa.^
56
Notation
The 'lovely passage in Plato' is from The Republic (1888, London: Macmillan). Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1898:8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date9 February 1898
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 325
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident in Kimberley from early August 1894 to November 1898, with visits, sometimes extended, elsewhere over this period. There is a page or pages missing from the letter after 'told, on very' at the end of the penultimate paragraph.
1 Feb 9 / 98
2
3 My dear Mr Merriman
4
5 I was indeed sorry to receive your letter which confirmed the bad news
6with regard to your election which I had heard else-where. Politics
7are so sad & depressing at the present time that one hardly likes to
8think of them. The thought that always forces itself on one, is, how
9few men & women there are in a community who cannot be bought; & it is
10this which depresses one so, because of the side light it throws on
11human nature. It is not the deliberately anti-social folk who depress
12one particu ^such as^ Sievewright or Rhodes or Harris; but the people
13who would be social, & are not, when pressure is put on them. You must
14not risk standing for Namaqualand if you are not sure to win. You must
15not give them the triumph.
16
17 I was so grateful, grateful beyond words, when my husband gave up all
18thought of standing for Parliament. This is not the time for a
19straight independent man of any school to enter public life at the
20Cape. He must either make a martyr ?of of himself or sell his
21principles I am told, on very
22
23[page/s missing]
24
25 ^Let me know if you have any good news with regard to your election.^
26
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of the letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1899:113
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date17 March 1899
Address FromJohannesburg, Transvaal
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 346-8
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hell
2 March 17 / 99
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 You will perceive from the superscription above that I am still in
7Johannesburg. I have not written to anyone, except absolutely
8necessary lines since I came here, because I have had nothing to write
9about but Johannesburg; it has filled all my thoughts or rather, it
10has crushed all power of thinking or feeling about anything else out
11of me. You know the place, but I think only to a woman's eyes can it
12be opened in all its full hideousness. It is the women that are the
13most terrible thing here; but doubtless the mass of ill-gotten wealth
14attained without labour & squandered with recklessness is the true
15source of the evil. It attracts the worst class of women to
16Johannesburg; & it demoralizes those who were not so ^demoralized^
17before. It is not the poor out-cast women who are the most terrible
18thing here, by any means: it is the apparently respectable women. I
19have lived in various places on earth, Monte Carlo, London, Paris. I
20have worked among the out-cast women & drunken sailors at the East End;
21 but anything so appalling, so decayed I have never seen.
22
23 The bitterest condemnation of Johannesburg society that I have heard
24was given utterance to the other day by a good old fashioned Lower
25Albany woman who has been ten years in Johannesburg, & who was
26absolutely uncons-cious of the fearful indictment she was making.
27
28 I said I found Johannesburg very depressing.
29
30 She replied, "Oh, but think of all the good one can do here." I said
31that was just what I didn't feel, the place crushed me. She replied,
32"Oh, but think of all the good one can do by simply leading a
33respectable life here
! It wouldn't be anything in any other place; &
34its so much in Johannesburg
!"
35
36 And that is the truth. In another place to become a burning & a
37shining light it would be necessary to exhibit at least some sparks of
38positive & active virtue: here it is quite sufficient that you should
39simply ^remain^ superficially faithful to your own selfrespect.
40
41 One realized in Johannesburg what the tone of society must have been
42in the reign of Charles the Second. The whole moral fibre relaxed.
43
44 I do not believe, as one of my good clergyman friends holds, that
45sexual degeneracy is the root of our evil here.
46
47 We are a city given over to lust. Lust of money in the first place,
48lust of pleasure, lust of excitement; & the tone of our sexual
49morality springs incidentally from this general attitude. It seems
50hopeless to me to labour at the effect while the cause remains. I
51never think of Johannesburg but those lines of Rossetti's come into my
52mind - "Even such in the world is lust."
53
54 ^April 2nd^
55
56 Yesterday my husband & I went down to hear Oom Paul's speech in the
57square. It was a touching & impressive sight to me. That simply sturdy
58son of South Africa, with his old white hair like long ragged thatch
59blowing about his forehead, & his closed eyes, & strong never-to-be
60moved-from-his-purpose face, in the midst of that seething, sharp,
61Johannesburg crowd. It was a fine speech. As given in the papers it
62loses all its directness, point & character.
63
64 Some working men were here to see me about it yesterday afternoon.
65They say if he will give them due notice of his coming next time the
66working men will get up a great demonstration for him, line the
67streets, &c. They did not know he was coming till the day before, &
68felt rather pained that they had not heard of his coming.
69
70 Have you much concern with the new paper? If so, could you, do you
71think, speak a word for the old man whose testimonials I send, he
72would be very glad to get some work on the paper, even if don not
73bringing in much. He has a small private income, but nothing to do, &
74wants work that would interest him. I don't know much of him, but my
75husband thinks highly of him.
76
77 Wasn't our success at Stellenbosch splendid. Do you feel hopeful as to
78Vryburg? I am feeling very hopeful about these elections, perhaps
79because I don't know enough.
80
81 Yours very sincerely
82 Olive Schreiner
83
Notation
'Even in such a world is lust' is a slight misquotation from Dante Gabriel Rossetti's 'Jenny', in his (1870) Poems London: F.S. Ellis. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1899:477
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 June 1899
Address From2 Primrose Terrace, Berea, Johannesburg, Transvaal
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other VersionsRive 1987: 361-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this letter has been written on in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident in Johannesburg from December 1898 to late August 1899.
1 Dear Mr Merriman
2
3 I wish I could feel as confident as you do about no war. I hope that
4you know more than I do; of course if Chamberlain gives up the
5colonial department it to Salisbury it will show that the more
6rational party is conquering at home, but that seems to be only a
7report. I have just spent two days over at Pretoria. The panic is not
8nearly so great there as here. Here all the women & children are
9fleeing. It is curious to see a city in this condition: all business
10is suspended. Evidently some here are working up the panic, because
11they wish the women & children out of the place, before they make a
12last effort to bring on war.
13
14 Go I hope if war does break out you men down there in the ministry
15will keep yourselves exceedingly cool. If things go against us we
16shall have to look to you to make terms for us. Why don't you some of
17you write more, & educate people in Europe on South African affairs;
18the other side, are mis-educating them as hard as they can
19
20 Thank you much for your interest in seeing the pamphlet published in
21Cape Town. I hope it will have some circulation in the Eastern
22Province. I Reitz has translated it into Dutch, & we are going to
23circulate it among the Burgers during the next few weeks. Edwar
24Boucher the French Consul here has translated it into French & is
25sending it home by this mail to Paris.
26
27 Yours ever sincerely
28 Olive Schreiner
29
Notation
'The pamphlet' and various translations refers to is An English South African's View of the Situation, originally published in the South African News over three successive days; see 'Words in Season. An English South African's View of the Situation' South African News 1 June 1899 (p.8), 2 June 1899 (p.8) and 3 June 1899 (also p.8). It was also reprinted in a number of other newspapers. It then was published as a pamphlet, then as a book. A second edition of the book was ready but withdrawn from publication by Schreiner when the South African War started in October 1899, so as not to profit from this. Rive's (1987) version of this letter is in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1904:55
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 February 1904
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Feb 13 / 04
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 My Husband has just sent me up a note from the office "Merriman,
7?Nevel, Sauer & ?Roodt defeated
" I am greatly cut up of course you
8& Mr Sauer will have other seats; but after your splendid fight it
9cuts hard.
10
11 But I, personally, always fight find that I fight best in a minority &
12for what looks like a loosing cause; & I know it will be so with you.
13
14 My feeling is that it not the slightest use our po hoping for anything
15from the jingo element of the community. Our own right hand alone must
16save us.
17
18 And the Rhodesian - speculator - party with Milner at their head, are
19doing more for us that we could ever do for ourselves.
20
21 I'm so sorry I had not a chance of seeing you the last time I was in
22town.
23
24 Yours very sincerely
25 Olive Schreiner
26
27

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1904:73
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date22 February 1904
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 22 Feb / 04
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I am glad to see you are so soon to have a seat, but you will be a
7terrible loss to us during the first weeks. I am going down with my
8husband ^& arrive in Town^ on the 2nd of March: but I doubt whether I
9shall ever visit the house: without yourself & with many whom one has
10desired never to see there it will not be cheering I would not much
11have minded our being in the minority had you been there. I think you
12would not be able to help feeling some pleasure if you heard the the
13deeply sympathetic & admiring way our people speak ^here^ of you. There
14is absolute consternation at the thought of your not being in
15parliament. I am glad of this for many reasons. One is that it shows
16they are quite able to appreciate your qualities though you are an
17Englishman.
18
19 I suppose you will be in Cape Town giving your advice though not in
20the house, at once.
21
22 Yours very sincerely
23 Olive Schreiner
24
25 This note requires no reply as I know how busy you must be. Pl As to
26Mrs Cloete, what did you ever expect from her? I have never been
27introduced to her but I have seen her; & that told me what to expect.
28unreadable from her As to her want of character being a reason for
29women's not having the franchise; you see how much harm an
30unprincipled woman can do without it!! You cannot prevent power from
31being exerted & its fo better to give responsibility where power
32exists
! Secondly, have you never met any other persons of the opposite
33sex whom it was objectionable to have in the political arena - say
34Rhodes, Smart, Jameson JS Du Toit? God, if they had never had the
35franchise what a blessed thing it would have been! Don't you think we
36shall bring in a bill for disenfranchising all males? Really, I don't
37think sex touches a man or womans the fitness or unfitness of any
38human creature for politics any more than ^for^ mathematics or any other
39abstract intellectual operation. There are fools of both sexes &
40scoundrels too. Remind me to tell you some day if ever we meet how one
41little Boer woman here stiffened the backs of our
42
43^leading men & Bonds men & prevented them from one of the most fatal &
44cowardly steps, in the height of the Martial Law.^
45
46 ^There is one little point on which I have not been quite able to
47understand your utterances. I won't trouble you about it would now but
48would like to dis-cuss it with you some time.^
49
50

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1905:76
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 May 1905
Address FromEastbergholt, Tamboer?s Kloof Road, Gardens, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Eastbergholt
2 Tambour's Kloof Rd
3 May 15th / 05
4
5
6 Dear Mr Merriman
7
8 No, it was not Mrs Van Heerden I inquired about but ?our Hanover people,
9 the relations of the three perfectly innocent men who were shot at de
10Aar: taken from the fields where they were working for the military,
11imprisoned & shot, though they had not only not joined the unreadable
12Boers, but we who knew them in the village knew they were men who
13never would have joined, who would rather of the two have joined the
14English. It therefore rather hard upon us to have to support these
15people year after year, when so many relations of people who fought &
16died for the Republics are in want.
17
18 I only wanted to know if you had heard at all or had any idea what the
19military are going to do. It will be rather hard if this country has
20ultimately to grant a pardon to to Englands loyal subjects whom she
21shot. If there is no hope of the military paying, I shall write an
22article to the American or English papers about it & so get them the
23help they must have. But it takes a great deal out of me & I would
24rather not do so if I can help it.
25
26 //I was sorry indeed to see you not looking at all well the other
27night in the house. Our political world would be poor indeed if it
28lost you, the one representative of the widest culture & of broad
29impersonal interests whom it possesses.
30
31 For myself personally, I always remember with a curious depth of
32feeling the letter you wrote me when your first read "Peter Halket."
33It was the one word of sympathy I ever got from any South African
34about the book, & it had a greater value for me than any sympathy that
35has ever been expressed for anything I wrote. I hope I shall yet live
36to see you Prime Minister of this country; but I shall not be sorry if
37Jameson stays in two years longer. He, & Milner & co, have carried on
38a fine pro-cess of education in this country, & have opened eyes which
39we could never have opened.
40
41 Don't trouble to reply about the executed men now; wait till
42parliament is over & you have more time, that will be just as well.
43
44 Yours very sincerely
45 Olive Schreiner
46
47 ^I am so glad that my husbands affection & sympathy for you has been
48growing ever since he was in the house. The nearer you come to good
49man the better he seems^
50
51 ^I have just been reading a most interesting book Rhodes History of the
52United States from 1850 to 1860, nothing profound but interesting &
53very clear.^
54
Notation
The book referred to is: James Ford Rhodes (1893) A History of the United States From the Compromise of 1850 New York: Harper.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1905:199
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 October 1905
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Oct 31st 1905
3
4
5 My dear Mr Merriman
6
7 It was rather strange that your letter should have come just when I
8was thinking I must write & ask you whether you had read a book called
9the Souls of Black Folks, & to advise you to get it at once if you
10have not.
11
12 It's by a coloured man, I should say from his photograph nearly a full
13blooded Negro, called du Bois ^& son of a slave.^ It's a book I have
14long been seeking & waiting for, in which some native should give true
15expression, not to what he feels it's politic & wise to express to
16white men, but to what he really feels. This book is just what I have
17wanted. The chapter I like best is the one called "The passing of the
18first-born" where he speaks of his child, with its "proud" little
19curly head who died before he ever learnt what he was & had to ?low it;
20 - & he, the father was glad. If you can't get it in Cape Town I will
21send you my copy. I should much like to know how you feel to it.
22
23 Yes, what you say on the matter of the natives & war is profoundly
24true: it bodes no good to any one when that delouche, King Edward
25shakes hands with the man of gold & speculation. That shake of Rhodes'
26hand at the time of the raid trial, represented more of the evil that
27has since over taken South Africa than many people are inclined to
28think. Last night I was looking at the new railway map. Have you
29noticed how all the new bits of line built are converging on
30Basutoland & Kaffir-land? - they are not only being built for carrying
31grain!! I feel as I felt twelve years ago, when first Rhodes plans
32with regard to the Transvaal & Freestate began to loom up before me.
33You see the thing only in misty out line; & yet you see it so clearly;
34& know what is coming. And ^yet^ you are so terribly helpless to do
35anything.
36
37 //The Lawrences spend a delightful week with me here; they have now
38gone up to the Falls, but will be back in Hanover today week. One
39would have to live year after year amid the suffocating narrow
40surroundings of a little up country town to know what the presence of
41friends from the outer world means to one.
42
43 My husband told me this evening that he had written to you on the
44Venter matter. It is a miserable, sordid little game they are playing
45up here.
46
47 //Is Wills' book on "Roman Society" in the Parliamentary Library? I am
48sure to be greatly interested in the study of that Roman Imperial
49world throws far more light on our problems & conditions today than of
50all intervening centuries in Europe. At present I am reading for about
51the 10th time Don Quixote. A friend in England has sent me an ideal
52little copy in four tiny volumes & I read myself to sleep with it
53every night, & I've never enjoyed it so much before.
54
55 South African politics & public matters are to me simply heart
56breaking at the present time, & I am trying to forget them in revising
57one of my old novels that I wrote many years ago. It is simply the
58lives of two women, one very intellectual & complex, the other very
59simple & unintellectual, but both equally beloved: its just the story
60of all they thought & did & felt, & how it
61
62^ended with them both. I should like to think I was leaving it ready
63for publication when I died, but don't make much progress with it
64because one can only do good work ^^except^^ at high pressure & one
65daren't sometimes put the pressure on.^
66
67I am sending you a copy of the Volk-stem with a little article on the
68Taal & myself: not of any interest in the personal way, but because it
69throws light on the narrow racial attitude with regard to South Africa,
70 which makes one in ones weakest moments almost despair of the future.
71
72Yours sincerely
73Olive Schreiner
74
Notation
The article in the Volkstem attacking Schreiner's article on the taal has not been traced. Schreiner's 'Letter on The Taal' was originally published in the Cape Times 10 May 1905 (p.9); it also appears in a shortened version as Appendix E in (ed) Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) The Letters of Olive Schreiner London: Fisher Unwin. The book referred to is: W.E.B. Du Bois (1903) The Souls of Black Folks Chicago: A.C. McClurg. Wills's book on Roman Society cannot be established.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1905:228
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date19 December 1905
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Dec 19 / 05
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I was very glad to see from the papers some time ago that though South
7Africa was near meeting with serious loss through a cart accident, we
8came off all right. I hope you felt no ill effect at all.
9
10 //Have you read "the Souls of Black Folk" yet? I am very anxious to
11know what you think of it. My copy is wandering about some where in
12Cape Town, Mrs Purcell had it & I asked her to send it on to Dr Beck.
13I wonder if it will appeal to any one just as it does to me!
14
15 //I have just finished reading Bryces "Studies in History &
16Jurisprudence" There is not much that is new in them & nothing that is
17mentally stimulating (the power to stimulate always seems to me the
18peculiar mark of genius) but I was much interested in his comparison
19of the differences between the Australian & Canadian powers of ^federal^
20Government. I had no idea before how very far the Canadian was behind
21the Australian, though I knew it was so.
22
23 A friend of mine, a Englishman of science but who has spent much of
24his time in the United States & in Canada, always tells me that it is
25a revelation to pass over the border from Am the United States to
26Canada The instantaneous difference is in the sense of freedom &
27independence ^& instinctive^ & high vitality, is, he says something
28almost inconceivable. Yet the people on both sides of the border are
29generally of the same race & often even blood relations! His verdict
30is the more interesting because he is strongly English in feeling I am
31absolutely convinced that that "Colony" which first starts on an
32absolutely free life of its own subservient even in name to none, will
33astonish the world by a mental & social afflorescence, which would
34never have been possible if it had remained in a state of even titular
35subservience. I need not tell you how splendid I thought your reply to
36those Imperialist questions.
37
38 The difference between a free confederacy of independent ^& equal^
39states is as different from Empire as health is from disease as life
40is from death - If ^they could only see it.^
41
42 My friends the Lawrences are now in Cape Town & will be there till the
433rd of January. I hope much they will meet you. He has a singularly
44sweet sympathetic spirit, & she a singularly strong & clear intellect.
45Their visit here was to me like rain on parched ground. My husband & I
46leave this week Saturday for Cape Town & shall stay there over Xmas &
47New Year so I shall see them again. I am very anxious to hear their
48view of Transvaal things, Chinese especially.
49
50 All good wishes to yourself & Mrs Merriman for the New Year & Xmas.
51
52 Yours sincerely
53 Olive Schreiner
54
Notation
The books referred to are: W.E.B. Du Bois (1903) The Souls of Black Folks Chicago: A.C. McClurg; James Bryce (1901) Studies in History and Jurisprudence Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1906:12
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date10 January 1906
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Jan 10th 1906
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I had planned to spend the 2nd at Stellenbosch & some friends had
7promised to drive me out to Schoongezigt in the afternoon. But the
8damp weather prevented my coming, so that that pleasure was impossible.
9
10 Thinking you had not got hold of a copy of "The Souls of Black" folks"
11I told my sister when she had finished reading it to send it on to you.
12 In case she should have done so, would you please had hand it on to
13Mrs Sauer some time when you are visiting Uitkÿk.
14
15 I am just finishing one of the most lovely & delightful books I have
16read for a long time, "Kokoro" by Lefcadio Hearn Have you read it? If
17not I think you will enjoy it. Of course you know he was a European
18who married a Japanese woman & lived so long among the Japanese that
19he is able to give us a partial insight into their inner life which
20would be possible for no ^ordinary^ European It makes me more sure than
21ever that I myself am only a little Jap who got born by mistake into a
22Western body!
23
24 Yes, I have felt deeply concerned on the Chinese question. It has
25absorbed my thoughts more than any other matter but the condition of
26affairs in Russia for a long time But my chief concern is as to our
27national responsibility towards those forty or fifty thousand men. In
28how far have those men ever understood the conditions of life & labour
29they were to exist under here before they came? In how far is their
30treatment in South Africa consonant with that universal freedom &
31justice which should form the only matter for pride to an enlightened
32people at the beginning of the 20th century?
33
34 I take it as axiomatic, that, no free democratic people can introduce
35into is social organizes a vast body of humans deprived of freedom &
36the common rights accorded to other men without producing the most
37serious & ?de even deadly disease in that organization,
38dis-co-ordinating all its lines of growth. It seems to me almost
39impossible to over estimate the many ways in which the introduction of
40the Chinese under the existing conditions must injure our social &
41moral growth as a community, & this entirely without supposing them to
42be worse than other folk. I do not think the good missionaries we
43force into China at at all worse than the average Chinaman, but he is
44the source of no end injustice, wrong & social suffering which forced
45artificially into the midst of a social organization which has no
46place or need for him!
47
48 Yes I entirely agree with you that the more things in general are left
49to themselves just now ^in South Africa^ & the slower they move the
50healthier & sounder will be our growth as a nation. This is not a
51country which can be safely hurried. The Chinese is perhaps the only
52question calling for immediate action, though many others larger &
53even more vital call for deep persistent thought. Good friends from
54England understand South Africa so little they are always urging one
55one on to write & speak not understanding that this is our time for
56silence. When you have planted seed you can do nothing but harm by at
57once beginning to hoe & rake over it. You must give it time to lie
58still & germinate.
59
60 With fondest regards from us both
61
62 Yours very sincerely
63 Olive Schreiner
64
Notation
The books referred to are: W.E.B. Du Bois (1903) The Souls of Black Folks Chicago: A.C. McClurg; Lefcadio Hearn (1895) Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life London: Gay & Bird.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1906:99
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 September 1906
Address FromThe Hotel De Aar, De Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 The Hotel
2 de Aar
3 Sep 13th 1906.
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman
6
7 I have not at present got Bos^well's^ life of Johnson. I had it of
8course but it vanished with most of the rest of my library in
9Johannesburg. We recovered a few books which friends there chanced
10upon some with the name of British officers written over mine, but my
11standard library of the books one always wants by one I am only slowly
12forming again. I have got a beautiful edition of Montaign lately, but
13it never seems to me quite the same thing as my old copy that I had
14read & loved from my girlhood. The American cuttings you sent my
15husband also got: certainly in this country nothing in that line is
16likely to be undertaken at present.
17
18 Yes, this sitting of Parliament seemed very disheartening; but I never
19felt quite sure in how far it was because I was so ill for the last
20two months that everything seemed to me so dead.
21
22 I am now staying with my husband at De Aar now, as he has sold the
23Hanover branch of his business & is attending to his branch here. It
24reminds me much of "Poker Flat;" (of course you've read the out-casts
25of Poker Flat?). It makes one cry out in despair amid the sand & dirt
26& tin shanties & rag-houses, & broken degraded humanity "Is there a
27God?" And yet no doubt the old beautiful humanity with its striving
28after the great & beautiful is to be found buried away here too.
29
30 I am so glad to hear Mrs Merriman is quite fit again. My husband says
31^sends^ greetings. He says I must tell you (this in answer to your ?jest
32 message to him!) that he hopes & believes you will grow more
33socialist ^as^ you grow older!! As for me I am an an individualist
34socialist. I back much that is called socialism because it alone gives
35the individual a chance of developing freely on individualist lines.
36
37 I am now reading for the fourth or fifth time "Amiel's Journal" the
38only thing I could find in this dusty sad little Railway Institute
39which takes the place of a library here. Writing I'm doing nothing at.
40I mended a bit at Matjesfontein, but the the heat & height are too
41great up here to allow of ones lying down at night, & the perpetual
42perpendicular does not comport with working ones brain much. Perhaps
43it will rain here & then all things will mend.
44
45 Yours very sincerely
46 Olive Schreiner
47
48 Have you got a vote in the election of members in the governing body
49of the Cape University, (I don't know what its called) but my friend
50Mrs Brown writes me there is a vacancy, & my dear old friend Dr Brown
51would like to get it. He's a splendid old fellow with no end of
52degrees & a member of the Cape University. He has to settle down
53quietly at Rondebosch instead of travelling about the world because
54his wifes ill health makes it necessary; & with his splendid health &
55vigour, he finds I fancy time rather heavy on his hands & would like
56more outlets in the direction of public work. If you think he would be
57as good as another man I would be so glad if you
58
59^could back him. He is a splendid old fellow. One has to know him as I
60have done ever since I was a girl of 16 to know how good & noble he is.^
61
62
63
Notation
The books referred to are: James Boswell (1901) The Life of Samuel Johnson London: J.M. Dent; Bret Harte (1899) 'The Outcasts of Poker Flat' in Bret Harte’s Gold Rush (1996) New York: Heyday Books; Michel de Montaigne (1866) Essays London: Sampson Low; Henri Frederic Amiel (1889) Amiel’s Journal: The Journal in Time of Henri-Frederic Amiel London: Macmillan.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1906:200
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSeptember 1906
Address FromThe Hotel De Aar, De Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 The Hotel
2 De Aar
3 Sep 1906
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman
6
7 I read your speech with great pleasure. Curious that people cant
8understand that the dearer they make living the harder they make life
9for the bulk of the people in a land like this.
10
11 Thank you much for old Boswell: he's been good company in these days
12which I'm not able to do much else but read. I've just read two books
13sent me from America "Coniston" by Winston Churchill & "The Pit" by
14Norris.
15
16 Both books well worth reading, & dealing with the great disease of our
17modern social life, Coniston is the strongest it is wonderful this
18awakening all over the world to the evils of monopoly, speculation &
19Bossism.
20
21 Yours very sincerely
22 Olive Schreiner
23
24 ^I shall probably be going to Matjesfontein for a month next week.^
25
Notation
The books referred to are: James Boswell (1901) The Life of Samuel Johnson London: J.M. Dent; Winston Churchill (1906) Coniston New York: Macmillan and Co; Frank Norris (1903) The Pit: A Story of Chicago London: Richards.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1906:214
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 November 1906
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Matjesfontein
2 Nov 13th 1906
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I am just reading a book that fascinates & pleases me greatly - the
7letters of Robert Lytton edited by his daughter Lady Betty Balfour.
8His daughter Con Lytton who is one of my closest friends has just sent
9it me. It is without any exception the most interesting book of
10letters I have ever read. As a rule a book composed of letters I
11simply will not read, & the more I love the person the less I am
12willing to read the letters because it always shows them in an a
13monotonous distorted light; but these letters have been chosen with so
14much tact & judgement they are really charming. If you should read
15them, I wish you would tell me what you think of them.
16
17 In politics I am of course as far divided from him as the East from
18the West; but on early all other points I have always felt a most
19curious sympathy with him. It is one of the tragedies of life that the
20people you most sympathize with in politics are those you least
21sympathize with in any other direction; & those you disagree with in
22politics are your own along all other lines. The letter he writes to
23John Morley when he feels that political differences are breaking
24their fellowship is very touching. Nothing in life is so agonizing as
25the parting of those who have once loved & trusted each other.
26
27 So, the world has gone round, & you are invited to Port Elizabeth, to
28enlighten the darkness there! Whatever else isnt true it certainly is
29true that the world goes round!
30
31 If you should pass through Matjesfontein please let me know that I may
32have the pleasure of going over to the station & shaking hands with
33you. I shall be here till the tenth of December. My husband is coming
34down from de Aar on Friday to spend two days with me; but just at
35present I am the only person in this big hotel It is really very
36comfortable here; I wonder why people don't come oftener.
37
38 Yours with many greetings to you both
39 Olive Schreiner
40
41 ^Have you read Coniston yet? My husband was as much impressed by it as
42I was.^
43
Notation
The books referred to are: Betty Balfour (ed. 1903) Personal and Literary Letters of Robert First Earl of Lytton London: Longmans Green; Winston Churchill (1906) Coniston New York: Macmillan and Co.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1906:232
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1906
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to its place in the archive sequence.
1 Dear Mr Merriman
2
3 Will you do me the favour of seeing that General Butler gets the
4enclosed note at once I don't know his movements. In what a truly
5shameful manner the Duke has made his visit here a party demonstration.
6 I have It should be be taken up fully & wisely by someone. I have
7just been reading Hervey's Memoir of the reign of George the 2nd. It
8is well worth reading, throws a strangely clear light on the nature of
9this ?Guelf family whom the English people at the present day delight
10to honour.
11
12 This is just a hurried note enclosing General Butler's letter.
13
14 Yours ever sincerely
15 Olive Schreiner
16
Notation
The book referred to is: John Hervey (1840) Memoirs of the Reign of George II London: John Murray.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1906:233
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 1906
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Wednesday night
2
3 Dear Mr Merriman
4
5 I have just had a great pleasure. Sir William Butler spent 24 hours
6with us. I have always said God doesn't give it to any man born in
7England ever to understand affairs in South Africa. But if he hasn't
8given it to any Englishman he has at least given it to this Irishman!
9I have not met any one born in this country or out of it with such a
10wonderful grasp on South African affairs as a whole. Large hearted,
11many sided, he is just the man South Africa has had need of, & has
12never had since Sir George Grey was here.
13
14 I have been reading with a good deal of interest that rather curious
15book "Frenzed Finance." Why oh why is the African News so dead & alive;
16 why does not not give poignant reviews, & con-cise bright leading
17articles dealing with such books & the endless other book & facts &
18that would educate the thought of young South Africa & set it thinking
19on the problems before it. We are terribly in need of a paper which
20shall be an awakening leading force in the country.
21
22 I hope we shall be able to see something of you & Mrs Merriman when we
23are in Town. At least I shall hear some of your speeches from the
24gallery. It is very important for some of us that parliament should be
25meeting in this cold wet time instead of two months earlier. The end
26of March, say the 25th would be the best time for its opening
27
28 Have you considered why I never refer to the question of womans
29position & the need for change in many directions, in my letters to
30you? Well, its because I can't. The matter lies so near to my heart,
31touches me so deeply that I can hardly dis-cuss it as an indifferent
32matter. It touches me as deeply as the question of the divinity of
33Christ & the sacredness of the Lords Supper touches an earnest
34Catholic. There are two subject which in the course of a rather long
35life I have never been able to dis-cuss with any one from academic,
36for the sake of dis-cussion, fond as I am of dis-cussion as a purely
37intellectual exercise - & these are religion & the matters relating to
38womans position. They lie too deeply among the roots of life to be
39ever lightly touched upon.
40
41 You will say, "But the mere question of woman's of political
42enfranchisement cannot be one affecting life so deeply." Yes - in one
43way the matter is a very, very little one; & yet in another it is very
44great. If you, John X Merriman were for five years owing to illness,
45business or absence from home, to abstain from casting your vote it
46would probably not appreciably affect the country, & not by a little
47affect your personal health, wealth, happiness or freedom; & so, in a
48way, it would be a small matter. But if a law were passed, that you,
49John X. Merriman, were not a fit & proper humanbeing to exercise the
50vote & prohibiting you from doing so, then in a moment the matter
51would become one of primary importance, worth fighting over & perhaps
52even under certain conditions laying down your life for. So small a
53thing in itself it would yet indicate your place in the society of
54which you form a part, your relation to your fellow men in a hundred
55ways, & so be of vital import.
56
57 More than that, the woman's question always presents itself to me as a
58whole. I cannot dis-cuss the ^seemingly small^ question of the franchise,
59 without out tracing its relation to other vast & vital human problems
60- prositution, the whole body of sex problems, the terrible parasitism
61of the woman of our upper wealthier classes, robbed of all forms of
62labour & becoming mere toys & seekers of pleasure; & the terribly
63under paid over worked condition of our women of the poorer classes, &
64the whole vast problem of the right of the individual human to freedom!
65 It's for me the bundle of straw, which pulled out of a hay rick
66brings the whole rick down upon your head! so I cannot dis-cuss it
67alone. ^But I fear my long scrawl will bore you.^
68
69 My husband is away at de Aar, or would join me in hearty greetings to
70you.
71
72 Yours ever
73 Olive Schreiner
74
75 ^Would it be possible for you if not too busy to tell me shortly, what
76the exact steps were by which the Imperial Government & the Military
77landed the responsibility for paying compensation for war losses on
78the heads of the unfortunate inhabitants of this Colony? I am not sure
79I have the facts quite right, & may need them shortly for something I
80am writing.^
81
82
83
84
85
86
Notation
The book referred to is Thomas William Lawson (1905) Frenzied Finance New York: Ridgeway-Thayer Co.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1907:16
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 February 1907
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Feb 26th 1907
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I am so delighted that Solomon has not got in. it's the finest thing
7about the election. All his other desertions I might make excuses for
8th but this desertion of the Progressives I can't. A man on the make
9looking for place & power can never be trusted. I am the last person
10in the world to blame a man for changing his views. Fortunately (or
11unfortunately!) for myself I was born with such a firm constitutional
12?build in one ^certain^ direction, that unless I violated myself I
13should have to keep on in one course. I was a republican, a feeler of
14the injustice of woman's position, an opponent of all here-ditary
15rights to govern others, a believer in the primary moral importance of
16defending the weak, animals or men, against injustice of oppression ^&c
17&c^ when I was ten, just as I am today & must be when I'm eighty unless
18I sell my soul. But I know & believe there are numbers of person more
19gifted more valuable than myself, who have not been born with a kind
20of constitutional mandate "this is thy way; & thou shalt walk in it &
21no other." & who form their opinions in quite another way, & who grow
22& expand in the dropping of old stand points & the attaining to new; &
23I should be the last person to think that a man may not be deeply
24consciencious in changing his view, even of the largest questions in
25life. But when you see a cat sitting on a hedge, & he always jumps
26down on the side on which there is a mouse running, it is difficult to
27believe he is not looking after mice.
28
29 I so entirely agreed with your remarks ?to the interviewer, as
30reported in the paper. Pimm & Creswell were the two men I most wanted
31to see in; Abe Bailey was the man I hoped to see thrown out more than
32any other. But I really fix little hope on this incoming government or
33any other. The first thing they are trying to do is bring down wages.
34Really enlightened men & women must be in this country for the next 50
35^(perhaps 30! only)^ years as the voice of one crying in the wilderness.
36
37 I am now as an old Boer would express it "full up to my throat" with
38South Africa. I have not lost my faith in the glorious forward march
39which humanity is still going to take upon earth; for "I doubt not
40through the ages one increasing purpose runs" -" . but here in South
41Africa we are the crest of a wave & there will be an awful sweep down
42wards before we mount on the other side; - hideous native wars,
43injustice & greed riding rampant, - with always the protesting few of
44course. Do not think I am despairing over human life & things generall;
45 I am more full of hope than ever; but just as I saw in England in 88
46that there was a long terrible downward dip before us, so I see it
47here today.
48
49 I have just got your speech on that most interesting fas-cinating of
50all question. I have not yet looked at it: am going to read it this
51afternoon. The subject of the decay & death of nature & empires has so
52interested me all my life that I have brought in a whole chapter in it
53in my big novel - which doesn't sound promising for the novel! - but
54it really had to come in, because the woman in the book was so
55interested in it.
56
57 I am very curious to see if your view & mine harmonize at all. You
58know it's only on the woman question you & I stand at such opposite poles
59
60^& I have hope we shall agree yet!!!^
61
62 Your friend,
63Olive Schreiner
64

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1907:91
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 August 1907
Address FromRossyvera, Norfolk Road, Sea Point, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Rossyvera
2 Norfolk Rd
3 Sea Point
4 Ju Aug 2nd 1907
5
6 My dear Mr Merriman
7
8 I was indeed very sorry that I was out when you called & that Mrs
9Merriman
was out when I called on her.
10
11 I am a prisoner today with the damp weather, but have been reading a
12very interesting book "A year in Russia" by Maurice Baring a young
13journalist of real promise Have you read it? It was sent me by the
14friend to whom it is dedicated. I feel far more interested in European
15(Russian, Irish & other) affairs just now than in South African. The
16world's centre of interest has passed away from us; though of course
17practical politicians & newspaper men must keep on ?pegging away at
18their own little ?shoe however dull the work may be!
19
20 If there were only one occupation on earth left - that of a politician
21- I should not seek it, though many women are preeminantly fitted for
22such work. I should always like to represent myself, not other people.
23I hope you have quite recovered from your influenza. I am perhaps
24going to take a run up to Pretoria at the end of the session to spend
25a few weeks with the Smuts's & perhaps with my old friend Lady Innes
26She is one of the few of my old English friends who was large enough
27never to allow our strongly opposed political views to make one
28moment's difference in our attitude of personal sympathy & love.
29
30 The sad thing about politics seems to me the overmastering
31intro-duction of the personal element. I will fight to the death over
32a principle but I will not fight over persons. Under our wretched
33party system of government, it seems all persons & no principles. A
34change must come soon - even in England. Of course there are times
35when a party stand for a vast principle - as was the case here during
36the war - & an individual man may, for a time be the noble incarnation
37of that principle: but when party politics becomes a question of of
38ins & outs, of who shall stand first in a party & who second & third,
39it all becomes unspeakably depressing to me. The only really big
40question we have before us now is the native question & in that I fear
41I shall find myself one day in a minority of one.
42
43 Yours most sincerely
44 Olive Schreiner
45
Notation
The book referred to is: Maurice Baring (1907) A Year in Russia London: Methuen.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1910:16
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date8 February 1910
Address FromRocklands, Beach Road, Sea Point, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToAgnes Merriman nee Vintcent
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Rocklands
2 Beach Road
3 Sea Point
4 Feb 8th 1910
5
6 Dear Mrs Merriman
7
8 I hope you understood I was not able to call on you before I left town
9because I was too ill to go anywhere. I tried Matjesfontein, but the
10doctors sent me down again as they said it was too high ^up there^ & now
11I am staying on here till I am better.
12
13 I thought your husbands speech at Worcester the finest he has made for
14years (though perhaps he will not like my saying so!) & agree with it
15entirely, almost.
16
17 Yours sincerely
18 Olive Schreiner
19
20

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1910:151
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 May 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 May 26th 1910
3
4 My dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I have just seen the notice in the paper of your mother's death. I
7hope you will not feel it an intrusion that I write to express my deep
8sympathy with you. I know what her death must mean to you, & I am
9especially sorry that it has come at this time of much stress &
10anxiety for you. I can never forget how at a time of great stress &
11anxiety in my own life, when I seemed standing utterly alone a letter
12from you which I always treasure brought me much sympathy, the only
13sympathy I ever got in that terrible time from a South African. And I
14wish it were possible for me to be of a little help to you. But human
15sympathy can but help us little in facing the greatest afflictions of
16life. In one sense it may turn out best that you are not in the
17ministry You will now be free to act as a leader to that small "us"
18who realize that only by treating the South African natives with
19justice & binding them to us by affection can we make the future of
20South Africa great.
21
22 Please give my love to your wife & tell her how sorry I was she was
23away both times I called at Mount Nelson.
24
25 Yours very sincerely
26 Olive Schreiner
27
28 Please don't think this letter
29
30^needs any answer. I know how fully occupied your thoughts are^
31
32

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1910:507
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date22 December 1910
Address FromPortlock, Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 c/o Haldane Murray
2 Portlock
3 nr Graaff Reinet
4 Dec 22nd 1910
5
6 Dear Mr Merriman
7
8 I am writing partly to send you & Mrs Merriman Xmas greetings; & yet
9more to express to you my great appreciation of your action on so many
10occasions during the last months; especially when you have spoken on
11the native question. It is sad - but not strange - that almost every
12attempt at legislation during the last session has in the direction of
13retrogression. The attempt to make legal marriage impossible between
14coloured & white, is but a small indication of the tide that has set
15in. The wagon of South Africa is beginning to make a long slide
16back-wards on the muddy road of time; & I am thankful that if you are
17not on the wagon chest as driver, that at least you are still walking
18along side to put a stone under the wheels now & then, & give a call
19to those oxen that are still struggling to hold things up. May you
20long be left to us as a country; & to the many men & women who
21recognize you as the ideal of outspoken rectitude in our public life.
22
23 I was very glad you put that little note in the paper explaining your
24pairing with J M Brown.
25
26 I am spending the hot summer months up here on this lovely solitary
27farm among the mountain tops, as the heat of de Aar was completely
28breaking me down. I have been able to do the first writing I have done
29for a year since I came here. The one life which South Africa has to
30offer which is worth living is the life on a farm, & I still cherish
31the dream that the day may come when my husband & I will be able to
32buy a little farm somewhere up among the mountains.
33
34 Hearty Xmas & New Year greetings to you both.
35
36 Yours very sincerely
37 Olive Schreiner
38
39

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1911:44
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 May 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Ap May 3rd 1911
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 Thanks for your letter. I have not seen the article in the "Economist"
7you mention. In this out of the world place one sees nothing. I am
8quite curious to know what it has to say! If you could without too
9much trouble send it me I would at once return it.
10
11 The serious matter to me in the present political condition is that
12there seems to be no opposition. I am no admirer of party government;
13I hold it far from the last word of human wisdom as regards forms of
14government - but where there are two strongly opposed & nearly more
15equal parties, the swing of pendulum as the one goes in & the other
16goes out, does keep things more or less balanced & straight. Where the
17leaders of one party are playing into the hands of the ^leaders of the^
18other it becomes abut the rottenest system we can conceive of. To me
19things in South Africa have not looked so grey since the time Rhodes &
20the Bond were hand in glove. I am glad Sauer & Burton are in the
21ministry - they are our safe guard as far as the native question is
22concerned - & in as far as any thing can safe guard us, in that
23direction - which isn't far! The blind forces of ignorance & greed in
24our white population are slowly but surely driving us towards a great
25tragedy.
26
27 Thanks very much for the book, but I'm such a bad French scholar I
28only plough through a work with the help of a dictionary. I can read
29George Sand as easy as English, but then hers is such a wonderfully
30clear, practical French.
31
32 Yours very sincerely
33 Olive Schreiner
34
Notation
An unsigned laudatory review appeared under as: ?Woman?s Place in Industry?, The Economist 1 April 1911, pp.685-6; it commented: ?This remarkable book is devoted to the advocacy of a far wider change than that involved in political franchises ? nothing less, in fact, than the introduction of women into the labour market of the world on equal terms with the other sex... This brings us to mention what some people will think not the least interesting part of this book ? namely, the Introduction. In this restrained, but none the less moving, exordium to her argument, Olive Schreiner explains how the book came to be written in the form in which it has been published...? . The book Merriman sent to Schreiner cannot be established.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1911:48
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 May 1911
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 May 12 / 11
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 Pray don't trouble about the Economist. I thought you took it & might
7have it lying about your study. As a rule I don't read reviews of my
8books, but anything that deals "seriously" with economic aspect of
9woman's position is always of great interest to me. Merely from the
10academic standpoint it is a fascinating study, as indeed all economic
11& financial problems are. I am always longing for a new Bagehot to
12arise to illuminate the financial problems of our day with his genius,
13as he did those of a generation ago.
14
15 I shall certainly get "The Beast" I have just finished Chestertons
16book on the "Party System," lay awake half last night to finish it.
17His statement of present conditions is true, but I think he doesn't
18quite enough see that the fault lies with the people at large. ^Though
19I have held for 20 years that proportional representation would tend
20to set things right.^ It has always been matter of astonishment to me
21how not only the lower middle class, but people of the highest culture
22& who profess to be dominated by the highest sense of honour could
23submit to seeing brewers & the new rich generally put into the house
24of Lords & set to govern the nation, without rising as a body &
25smiting down the Government who attempted it, instead of accepting it
26as a perfect right & proper thing with smiling calm.
27
28 Yes, it is sad for those of us who feel our journey is not a long one
29now, to know we shall never live to see the better time which after 15
30or 16 years of blood shed struggle & retro-gression will I believe
31begin to dawn on South Africa. For you there is this thought that you
32will always be remembered as a man whose financial integrity was
33unshaded Men will say these things couldn't have been done in the days
34when Merriman was there to protest.
35
36 I am going up to the Victoria Falls by the excursion that leaves Cape
37Town on the 1st of June, with my brother Will's wife & children. It
38would be rather fine if you & Mrs Merriman were coming too.
39
40 Yours sincerely
41 Olive Schreiner
42
Notation
An unsigned review of Woman and Labour appeared in the Economist. See 'Review of Books. Woman?s Place in Industry' Woman and Labour 1 April 1911, page 685-6; this comment: 'This remarkable book is devoted to the advocacy of a far wider change than that involved in political franchises - nothing less, in fact, than the introduction of women into the labour market of the world on equal terms with the other sex... This brings us to mention what some people will think not the least interesting part of this book ? namely, the Introduction. In this restrained, but none the less moving, exordium to her argument, Olive Schreiner explains how the book came to be written in the form in which it has been published..... The books referred to are: J. Cathcart (nd) The Beast London: P.S. King; Hilare Belloc; Cecil Chesterton (1911) The Party System London: Stephen Swift.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:122
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 July 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 July 2nd 1912
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 It would be impossible for me to tell you the depression I felt when I
7heard Hertzog had been appointed Minister for Native Affairs. But I
8passed through the bitterness of death in South African affairs when
9the Union was formed. It was then to me as if a wagon were drawn up at
10the top of a mountain & set slowly going back-wards over the edge - at
11first to move slowly but surely & steadily back-wards down a gentle
12slope, but gaining more & more speed as it moves down breaking &
13crashing everything that comes in its way, & its left at last at the
14bottom. I may be mistaken but I have always looked for a steady back
15ward movement for ten or fifteen years. I am simply obliged not to
16think of public matters which I am so powerless to help or touch. One
17sits by watching a tragedy. Do you note the wires in the papers saying
18there is no unrest in Basuto Land? That is the prelude to saying that
19there is!
20
21 I am deeply sorry about Sauer. It seems to me & & Burton ought to have
22resigned & they with many or at least some of us who would have stood
23by them through thick & thin would have formed a powerful third party
24able to keep any party in power from doing too many evils. It is in a
25powerful third party that the political hope of South Africa lies -
26such as it is. And are there men single minded enough to form such a
27party to renounce the hope of power & three or four thousand a year
28for impersonal aims?
29
30 I have been studying the defence act - with the blue book of military
31law - without which it is ?misunderstanding & its deep evil cannot ha
32be understood.
33
34 //A friend has just sent me from England a book called "Revolutionary
35Types" in it is an article on "Toussant L'ouvertoure." Which gives a
36few more details of his life than I have yet been able to get. But his
37real life is yet to be written. A literary friend to whom I wrote
38about says there is practically nothing in the British Museum but that
39is Paris there are the richest material for a life - political &
40orther documents & valuable article on him written at or soon after
41his time in magazines newspaper &c.
42
43 I wish I could start some one on writing a real life.
44
45 Did you note Fichard last out burst on the parliament being removed
46from Cape Town. It certainly will be under any conditions before long.
47When the Union was started before the parliament met two or three dead
48leading men told me in Pretoria it would not be there for more than
49two or three years at the most. This isn't a very cheerful letter
50
51 Yours ever
52 Olive Schreiner
53
54 ^My husband is away at the Victoria Falls. I have not seen a human face
55or spoken to a human being since he left ten days ago except my wild
56little coloured girl. One is almost as cut off from the world at de
57Aar as on a desert Island!^
58
Notation
The book referred to is: Ida Ashworth Taylor (1904) Revolutionary Types London: Duckworth.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:132
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date11 August 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Aug 11th 1912
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman.
5
6 Re. your letter. No, I do not take a sorrowful view of life generally;
7nor above all of the of condition of the world at the present day. I
8think in many countries things are what an American would call on the
9"up grade." The clear minded impartial looker on knows perfectly well,
10or ought to, when things in his country or any other (of which he has
11intimate knowledge) are going, as he from his standpoint forwards or
12backwards. Sometimes ^of course^ the backward movement is permanent, &
13means death. This was the case when the Roman Empire decayed; when
14Greece in third century, ^& second century^ began to fail. Far seeing
15souls did then see the decay, & did see all it meant; & were surely
16sorrowful. But there are smaller waves of backward movement & of
17forward. In 1880 when I went to England a strong (from my standpoint)
18forward movement was setting in. It continued till (roughly speaking)
19about 89 88. Then we who there were working at ^in^ the heart of things,
20felt a change becoming to come; subtle, but wide, & unmistakable. We
21all felt it. In 1890 when I left England to visit South Africa, we
22were looking into each others faces & saying "What is it that is
23coming over ^our^ English life." There was from the liberal & advanced
24stand point a distinct & vast back-wash setting in: When I went back ^&^
25it was to go on till it produced the Jameson Raid & the Boer War. When
26I went back to England for a visit in the year af ter ^after^ of the
27Jameson Raid, things had reached a much lower level than when I left
28in 1890. A dead unreadable ^pall^ rested over the whole life of the
29people - it was ghastly! You yourself The upper class - "society" -
30under the growing influence of the then Prince of Wales, Edward, was
31becoming rotten to its core. I shall never forget ^when^ one of the
32Princes "smart set," the daughter of a Lord married to the son of a
33Duke, called on me at half past 11 in the morning with white kid
34gloves on, loaded on the out the outside with diamond rings almost to
35the fingertips - frowsy ^dyed^ yellow hair hanging into her eyes, &
36looking like the most abandoned prostitute (I thought when I went into
37the drawing room to meet her she was one of the unhappy women I used
38to work among come to see me); & she entertained me with her views on
39sex matters, saying for instance that when a woman had born two
40legitimate children to a man to inherit his title & position she had a
41perfect right to amuse herself with other men as she liked &c &c. The
42days of the Lady Lyttons & Burdett Coutts's was passing at court, ^&
43social life was rotting from above downwards.^
44
45 The "noncomformist conscience" that Rhodes so hated & feared was
46dieing in the middle classes, a passion for dress, luxury & gain was
47eating it up. The saddest of all to me was the change among my own
48section the working classes & democratic organizations. The noble
49impersonal enthusiasm which had played such a large part among us in
50the early 80's was dead ^or at least torpid.^ A lifeless striving after
51gain for themselves had taken its place. Literature was at its lowest
52ebb. Tit Bits & ?Alles ?Slopper were flooding the land: The whole
53press ^almost^ was in the hands of the capitalists - because they
54represented the spirit of the nation
. Literature was dying; In place
55of the giants Wil who were passing ^William^ Morris, Browning Tennyson,
56Huxley Darwin, we had our idol Rudyard Kippling - & he gave voice to
57the soul of the people when he thirsted for a land -
58
59 "Where the best is like the worst,
60 And there ain't no ten commandments,
61 And a man can slake his thirst!"
62
63 You, yourself must have felt something of this ^downward movement in
64England^ for in a letter you wrote me two days before I sailed for
65England ^at the time of the Jameson trial^, you told me, I would be
66disappointed that there was nothing, absolutely nothing, to be hoped
67for from England! I knew & had felt the great material^ist^ reaction
68that was coming on in 1890 when I left England, but even I could not
69believed till I went there that my England; the England of the earlier
7080's was so wholly dead. I shall never forget my my interview with
71John Morley at the time of the Jameson trial. How politely he sneered
72at me when I spoke of the great war Rhodes & Chamberlain would bring
73about in South Africa, & its terrible results. How politely he implied
74that I was imaginative & mislead ^by feeling,^ that such a thing was
75impossible! That he knew Joe Chamberlain well with all his faults but
76that he was going to make such a war ^as^ I painted was inconceivable.
77You felt every-where that you were battering your head against a stone
78wall that never moved. One day 7 leading Englishmen of widely unlike
79types came to see me in succession & I put to each of them the
80question what was the meaning of the terrible changes that has passed
81over the life of England. Each gave a slightly different reason; but
82not one denied that a great war of materialism, a deadness towards all
83the higher & nobler aspects of human life had crept over the nation:
84that there was a great back-ward movement.
85
86 I think my friend J A Hobson was nearest the truth when dis-cussing
87this great backward movement with me some years later he said, "We are
88are suffering from a wave of excessive commercial prosperity 'Ephraim
89hath waxed fat & kicked' " But that there was such a backward movement,
90 to be ended only when England was pulled up sharply to the earth by
91the Boer war with its subsequent loss & shame, I think no one who in
92the future studies the history of England will doubt.
93
94 You will no doubt say "What on earth are you raking up these old
95stories for? No one doubts them." I am doing it in answer to your
96criticism. You say, I am needlessly depressed when I say I perceive a
97steady downward & backward movement in South Africa, which it seems to
98me, must go on for twelve, fifteen, or even twenty years; & you say,
99"Things are never so bad as they seem." Not only are they sometimes as
100bad, but they are sometimes much worse!
101
102 We, who between 1888 & 1890, felt the great backward wave creeping
103over us in England, knew that many & evil days were coming; but even
104in our most farseeing moments ^did^ we never pictured anything so
105morally shameful & nationally degrading as the wave of greed &
106Imperial lust that was to to sweep over England, always increasing in
107volume of 12 or 14 years; to end with ^the^ connivance of Rhodes,
108Chamberlain & Edward the 7th in the Boer war; which all but brought
109England on to her knees. It is true that in the last years England has
110been ^rudely^ awakened again; & is now moving forward slowly - but evil
111bears fruits which long poison the soil on which it falls.
112
113 I feel about South Africa exactly as I did about England between 1888
114& 1890 when the downward reaction was first setting in. I cannot blind
115my eyes to the conditions of the society about me. Some day the
116movement may be reversed when we have had some great & terrible lesson;
117 but the backward movement is here now.
118
119 We are seeking slowly & steadily to undo the work which the George
120Greys
& William Porters & Saul Solomons sought to begin in this
121country: our social & moral ideals are sinking. ?Burton & Saul Solomon
122tried to start
We are narrowing our social & political rights - we are
123trying to with-draw even educating advantages from the mass of our
124people, who are our natives. In our defence force we are going to tax
125the nation to inaugurate a vast power for evil & blood shed, & civil
126war; which will begin with the native but not end there. When we have
127had our big native wars & dispossessed the native of his land, we may
128get cheap labour for the mine owner & the farmer, but we shall have
129created such a ^terrible^ proletariate as our will be our ultimate
130undoing Perhaps to me the saddest of all parts of the out look is the
131attitude of our so called labour party - much sadder to me than can be
132to you, who are not yourself a democrate & a sympathizer with labour
133in all lands. They are no real "labour party" at all, but a little
134plutocratic body seeking to crush down the mass of labourers, as much
135as any body of mine owners & land owners. The mere fact that our
136politicians have been able to give themselves incomes of three & four
137thousand a year in a poor country like South Africa - they they have
138have been able to carry out their plot of money granting for the
139building at Pretoria - & the nation has taken these things sitting down,
140 shows to me the direction in which we are moving.
141
142 Do not think that I mean there is no virtue left in South Africa.
143There is always Elijah at the door of his cave in the darkest hours of
144national degeneracy - & no doubt the Lord hath reserved to himself the
145ninety-&-nine thousand - but if he has, he has hidden them so away in
146the hollow of his hand that they don't show.
147
148 I know even in public life there are men like yourself & my brother
149who have principles & ideals, to whom 3 or 4 or it might be 6 thousand
150a year would be but as a handful of sand compared to leading the
151people on paths that seem to you right. But you will never be leaders:
152a man cannot lead when there is no one to unreadable ^follow!^ I do not
153blame the politicians alone - people make their governments A little
154oligarchy eaten up by the desire of keeping all South Africa to
155themselves & filling their pockets with gain, whether Englishmen or
156Dutch-men, mine owners or farmers, has got quite as good a government
157as it desires.
158
159 A little white Oligarchy seeking even to exclude more white men from
160the country that it may retain all advantage & gain for itself, &
161seeking to crush down & hold only for its own advantage the body of
162labouring millions, must ultimately bring about its own terrible
163retribution. What form exactly it will take no one can yet say.
164Perhaps it may be in 15 or 20 years when a great Asiatic fleet rides
165in Table Bay, & the down trodden millions who should be our main
166defence & strength, leap up to join a power, which may give them more
167justice, & cannot give them less? ?In
168
169 Some great reversal of our ideals & aims may save up. But I see no
170sign now of that reform.
171
172 I'm afraid you'll never get through this fearfully written scrawl. So
173I won't say any more. You see I'm trying to justify myself to you!
174
175 Yours very sincerely
176 Olive Schreiner
177
178 I really must apologise for inflicting on you this long tirade P: You
179will think my pen tonight is like the mill that couldn't leave off
180grinding till the whole sea became salt!
181
Notation
The quotation starting 'Where the best is like the worst' is from Kipling's poem 'Mandalay', in Rudyard Kipling (1892) Barrack-Room Ballads and Other Verses London: Methuen & Co.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:164
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date22 October 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 de Aar
2 Oct 22nd 1912
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 It's strange how often it happens that just when you are going to
7write to a friend they write to you. I'd an envelope just addressed on
8my dest when your letter came. I wonder much what you felt about
9Hertzogs speeches?
10
11 Thank you for Well's book. I was just wishing to read it. The tone is
12to me as you say much less painful in a certain spiritual coarseness
13than his other late book. But how detestable all his women are; &
14impossible too in the deeper sense! The only woman he's ever painted
15who strikes me as real & lovable is that 'Aunt" in "Tono-Bungay" But
16this "marriage" is profoundly interesting in its attempt to paint the
17pitiful soul of the woman who lives in externals, & who must spend at
18all lost & at all cost to others. But Wells doesn't quite understand
19the woman he paints. If she were as intelligent as he paints says she
20was, she would have had to a wickeder woman to act as she did. If she
21was a "fool" - of course a fool can do anything!
22
23 Wednesday
24
25 I have just been reading the account of Patrick Duncans pamphlet in
26the Argus. It is the one cheering thing I have seen in the papers for
27a long time. Of course you know Patrick Duncan well? I think him an
28exceedingly fine & valuable man.
29
30 I suppose Sauer will soon be out. I do trust he is not going to allow
31himself to be kicked out of the ministry, & then take some highly paid
32post, that would keep him silent for ever. We cannot afford to lose
33him altogether. If he would only stand out & fight, how many of us
34would follow his lead! Numbers are not everything. The one hope for
35South Africa to-day would lie in some small party strong in ability &
36a large liberal out look; whose members first object would be not to
37seek for office; but who were willing to remain out of office & to
38hold the balances between the office seeking parties, & prevent either
39from too retrogressive a course. Do you see any possibility of such a
40party being formed?
41
42 I finished reading "Marriage" last night, found much in it I would
43like to dis-cuss with you.
44
45 Yours very sincerely
46 Olive Schreiner
47
48 The drought here is terrible. Never since de Aar was de Aar the the
49doctors tell me, has there been anything like the amount of illness
50there has been in the last two months.
51
Notation
Patrick Duncan's pamphlet was his 1912 Suggestions for a Native Policy Johannesburg: Central News Agency. The book referred to is: H.G. Wells (1912) Marriage Leipzig: Bernhard Tauchnitz.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:191
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 November 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Novem 20th 1912
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 Many thanks for the booklet. It is Interesting.
7
8 I am leaving for Cape Town tomorrow night, & shall stay at my brother
9Will's till New Year & after that at Muizenberg. The heat & height
10here are very trying - the drought grows worse & worse. We have had no
11drop of rain for 9 months. I hope I shall see something of you & Mrs
12Merriman
when Parliament begins & you come down.
13
14 Yours sincerely
15 Olive Schreiner
16
17 Have you read an interesting article on Lloyd George by Lisle Marsh
18Phillipps, in the "English Review" for November? Phillips is always
19interesting.
20
21 I hope Fitchat will get in for Grahamstown, but fear it will be one of
22the other two. We want a few independent men in the house just now.
23
Notation
The booklet referred to cannot be established. The article on Lloyd George is: Lisle March Phillipps ?Mr Lloyd George and the country? The English Review November 1912 vol 12, pp.631-42.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:207
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to its location in the archive sequence.
1 De Aar
2 Sunday night
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 Thank you very much for your letter. The woman question, as you know,
7lies so near to my heart I can't dis-cuss it with any one.
8
9 But I am delighted you should have found matter for interest in my
10little book. What pains me is that in it I have only dealt with a
11small part of a great human question, which cannot be rightly grasped
12unless all its sides be seen.
13
14 I have just been reading the delightful autobiography of my dear old
15friend Sir William Butler. It never sinks to vulgar personal detail, &
16yet through it all beautiful, childlike, genius-ful spirit of the man
17speaks. I had a long letter from him written just three weeks before
18he died. I was going to answer it on the day when I heard of his death.
19 It was a comfort to me to realize that even had I answered it the day
20I got it ^it^ would not have reached him in time.
21
22 Have you read a novel called "The House of Mirth" by Edith Warton? It
23is a curiously interesting book, as being the life of a typical female
24"Parasite," written not with any sermonizing interest, but simply, &
25one might almost say ^unconsciously^ produced, as art. It is a type from
26which one shrinks so strongly, & yet for which one feels so much pity,
27as the out come of unhealthy social conditions.
28
29 I hope you are going to enjoy a long good rest after what seems to
30have been a very trying time of labour. You have done invaluable work
31this session. For me, I see a long 12 or 15 years of ^a^ down hill path
32for this country; when, having learnt some terrible lessons with
33regard to the treatment of our fellows brown or black - such as
34England had in her Boer war only on a much larger scale - the path
35will slowly begin to ascend. I do not see how studying the attitude of
36the majority of white men in this country the most terrible crimes &
37mistakes can be avoided - as you say, one fears to speak lest one
38bring things nearer. When I hear people talk of the absolute necessity
39of an exterminating war with the Basutos & dark races generally
40because they are so rapidly becoming socialized & skilled workmen, &
41if not crushed now will never be crushed; I am always reminded of a
42visit a friend of mine paid to Milner before the Boer war, when he
43stuck his hands on the arms of his chair, & said, "It is now or never!
44They will become too strong for us if we wait!" How often is man's
45"now", God's "never"!!! They talk so much of the far seeingness of
46business men, & "men of the world"; but it seems to me often they are
47the blindest things that walk the earth. Their gaze is fixed with such
48intensity on the bit of earth just under their feet, that they fail to
49see the yawning precipice towards which they are slowly & surely
50moving.
51
52 I hope your health keeps good; & that we have many long years of your
53work still before us.
54
55 Yours sincerely
56 Olive Schreiner
57
Notation
Schreiner?s 'little book' is Woman and Labour. The books referred to are: William Butler (1911) An Autobiography London: Constable; Edith Wharton (1905) The House of Mirth New York: C. Scribner?s Sons.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:208
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 1912
Address FromGrand Hotel, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to its location in the archive sequence.
1 Grand Hotel,
2 Muizenberg,
3 Saturday night.
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman
6
7 I hope you are feeling fit & strong for the cession It was nice to see
8you for a moment at the Innes's. I wonder what what you thought of
9Hertzog & Tathams speeches.
10
11 Tatham seems to me absolutely mad! His statement that the British
12Empire came into being because Edward the 4th refused to export wood
13makes one's brain go round. But But folly & madness can be very
14dangerous things. Peter the Hermit preached a crusade that cost
15hundreds of thousands of human lives! I thought Sauer's speech at the
16dinner very good.
17
18 I want very much to come in to some of the debates but it's difficult
19to know, now my husband is not in the house, when an interesting one
20will come on. They say Hertzog is going to keep quite silent - but I
21doubt ^it.^
22
24 Yours very sincerely
25Olive Schreiner
26

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:209
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 1912
Address FromAlexandra Hotel, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper with a drawing of the hotel.
1 Alexandra Hotel
2 Muizenberg
3 Tuesday 1912
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman
6
7 I wonder if you will think I am taking a great liberty if you ask you
8if ever you think you think you will be making a speech in the house
9on any interest point, you could perhaps drop me a line to let me know
10so that I may come in. The heat of Cape Town unfits me very much, &
11the say the new speakers gallery is unspeakably close. So I dont wish
12ever to come in on the chance of hearing nothing, but Mr Haggar or
13some equally absorbing speaker. Of course one doesn't always know when
14one will speak. I hope you won't think I'm too troublesome.
15
16 I wish you & Mrs Merriman were here instead of at Mount Nelson. The
17air here is glorious. I've not felt so well for some years as during
18the last four days I shall probably stay here till the end of March.
19
20 I wonder if you have read that "House of Mirth" by Edith Warton which
21I spoke of at the farm. My little niece Lyndall Schreiner has just
22read it, & is as much impressed by it as I was. But novels do appeal
23in such very different ways to different persons.
24
25 I hope you are feeling fit & strong for battle. It is the squatters'
26bill that gets me on the raw.
27
28 Yours sincerely
29 Olive Schreiner
30
Notation
The book referred to is: Edith Wharton (1905) The House of Mirth New York: C. Scribner's Sons.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:210
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 1912
Address FromAlexandra Hotel, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper with a drawing of the hotel.
1 Alexandra Hotel
2 Muizenberg
3 Monday, 1912
4
5 Dear Mr Merriman,
6
7 Thank you very sincerely for your letter. I hope to come in on the
815th.
9
10 The interest in the House of Mirth lies not in the least in the love
11story - that is only necessary because it shows how even love falls
12powerless in the presence of the absolute love of pleasure, ease,
13excitement & the material good of life - in the case of those unhappy
14modern women who are tending to become parasitic
15
16 I know of two women whose attitude towards life - though it is in no
17way a sermon - has been materially influenced by it - so the book
18cannot be wholly powerless. But I can quite understand it is outside
19the line of those many important interests that are necessarily
20absorbing your life & thought just now. One can't be interested in
21every thing - though I think both you & I have have the same
22characteristic of being interested in almost every thing - & running
23out - if it is possible - in too many directions!
24
25 I see nothing of the vulgar side of Muizenberg. I have only once been
26near the beach to look for someone in the ten days I have been here. I
27sit in my little room writing all day, with a glorious view of the Bay
28& Simons town & Cape Point from my big window & after dinner walk on
29the high road or look in on some of my friends who have cottages along
30it. It perfectly ideal to me. I don't know when I've been so happy.
31
32 "Alles ten besten"
33 Olive Schreiner
34
Notation
The book referred to is: Edith Wharton (1905) The House of Mirth New York: C. Scribner's Sons.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1912:211
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 1912
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAgnes Merriman nee Vintcent
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is archived in the 1912 sequence and has been dated accordingly.
1 De Aar
2 Tues-day
3
4 Dear Mrs Merriman
5
6 Many thanks for your letter I have written for the price lists
7
8 We live largely on dried peaches & they seem difficult to get in the
9Western Province. I suppose it pays better to sell really good peaches
10than dry them. At Prince Albert they are too far from the railway, so
11they dry all their fruit.
12
13 Please thank your husband for his letter. Tell him, I say, who is
14doing the lamentations of Jeremiah now?!! With his - "Truly we are
15like the children before the flood" &c &c!!! I have a most absolute
16faith in the good & beauty of the future destiny of the human race on
17earth;
18
19 "All we have willed & hoped or dreamed of good shall exist;
20 Not its semblance, but itself; no beauty, nor good, nor power
21 Whose voice has gone forth, but each sorrows for the melodist,
22 When eternity affirms the conception of an hour.
23 The high that proved too high, the heroic for earth too hard,
24 The passion that left the ground to lose itself in the sky,
25 Are music sent up to God by the ?seer & the bard; -
26 Enough that he heard at once: we shall hear it by-&-by."
27
28 I think that sums up my religion very well. Even at the present day I
29think human affairs are advancing gloriously in the world as a whole.
30Even in England to-day things are going forward as I hardly dared to
31hope a few years ago.
32
33 The fact that China is awakening from her long sleep & even the women
34are ceasing to bind their feet; that the women in Turkey are seeking
35for education & advancing gives me great joy. But here in South Africa
36for the present we are in a back water. When the boys & girls, & those
37who are infants in arms now, are the men & women of South Africa a
38better time will come! - though we shall not be here to see it. Girls
39like my two nieces Lyndall & Ursula ^Schreiner^ & Bessie Reitz are such
40a joy to me. Do you know Bessie Reitz? She is the most remarkable girl,
41 with a heart as warm & large as her intellect is bright & burning.
42Have you heard that Julie Brown is engaged to Hugo Naude? She wrote to
43tell me yesterday.
44
45 No, I have not read Sully's new books. I have just got a new book in
46Proportional Representation by John Humphreys which I think will be a
47treat.
48
49 I was not surprised at Sauer's action. I am never surprised at
50anything a politician does. Twice a politician has almost broke my
51heart by disappointing the high hopes I had fixed on him - now no more.
52 I expect nothing.
53
54 Many thanks for all the trouble you took in answering my letter.
55
56 Hearty greetings to your husband. What I love about him is his
57openness & directness, which is quite incompatible with the intrigue
58which marks the true politician.
59
60 Yours very sincerely
61 Olive Schreiner
62
63 ^Please excuse the blots I am cooking the dinner & watching a boy carry
64in ground to my garden at the same time as I'm writing my mail letters
65& I don't seem to be like the wonderful man who could do three things
66perfectly at once.^
67
Notation
The book referred to is: John Humphreys (1911) Proportional Representation London: Methuen. The 'new books by Sully' are likely to be: James Sully (1912) Italian Travel Sketches London: Constable & Co; (1912) Studies of Childhood London: Longmans. The quotation starting 'All we have willed & hoped' is from Robert Browning's 'Abt Vogler' in his (1864) Dramatis Personae London: Chapman & Hall.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1913:71
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday June 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 De Aar
2 Wednesday.
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I thought your speech on the Native Bill very fine, but oh if you
7could have seen your way to vote against the Bill! But the speech was
8exceedingly fine.
9
10 Up here one knows little how things are going. But if the result of
11all this wrangling is to break up the purely racial parties that exist
12at present it will not have been with out its good. There really ought
13to be three parties in this country - the extreme flagwaving folk, on
14one side with their wretched imperialism & the extreme taal
15retro-gressives on the other; & a third of liberal enlightened men of
16both races in the middle; but I suppose there is small hope of that
17^just at present.^
18
19 I wonder what you really think of the position of affairs now?
20
21 I have just been re-reading some very old books. "Robinson Crusoe";
22read last when I was 9 years old. I must say I'm tremendously
23disappointed with it. I'd no idea there was so much endless padding &
24unnecessary moralizing in it. Then I've been reading for the first
25time Duma's "Three Mus-keeters." What a wonderful thing genius is! I
26who hate above all things fighting, adventure & filibustering, have
27read it with breathless interest. There us really nothing a man of
28genius can't write about & make it interesting! Have you seen "The New
29Statesman"? Mrs Sydney Webb has sent me the first copies & wants me to
30write for it. It is in a way interesting but I think not nearly as
31good as "The Nation." There is too much "tall" modern writing in it.
32What I joy there is in turning from that type of English to the old
33classical writers, even "Robinson Crusoe"! I think we owe much of this
34^modern^ decedence in the English language to Meredith & ?Bates. It
35might be forgiven in Meredith because I believe it was natural to him,
36but its hideous in the men who affect it. As some politicians use a
37cloud of words to cover their real meaning, so some writers invert
38their sentences & use impossible words in wrong places to hide their
39want of thought.
40
41 Please remember me very kindly to Mrs Merriman. I am so sorry I saw so
42little of while in Cape Town, but I was able to go nowhere while at
43Muizenberg except twice to lunch & four times to the house owing to my
44unfitness. I hope you keep fit. We can't do without you.
45
46 Yours very sincerely
47 Olive Schreiner
48
Notation
The books referred to are: Daniel Defoe (1908) Robinson Crusoe London: Longmans; Alexandre Dumas (1908) The Three Musketeers London: Thomas Nelson and Sons.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1913:72
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated by reference to its location in the archive sequence.
1 De Aar
2 Sunday
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 Though I only posted my note to you this morning I must add a line to
7tell you how delighted I was with your remarks reported in Friday's
8paper.
9
10 Serious as the tax on amusements is, it is not half so serious as the
11"ridiculous little publication" as you so well call the "de Waals
12Catechism." Where are we going to? Your speech was simply splendid; so
13was Jagger's. Picture only, giving a man like de Waal the right to act
14as censor over all the literature which may or may not be acted,
15recited, or in any way be used in public or private for enter tain
16ments!
17
18 I am thankful you spoke on these matters. It most assuredly was your
19duty.
20
21 Yours sincerely
22 Olive Schreiner
23
24 I fear you won't agree with me, but I felt Bothas remarks about Rhodes
25at the ?unveiling of Krugers statue entirely uncalled for & in very
26bad taste. It is such things as this which excuse Hertzog & his
27followers. Of course I don't believe in the two streams theory; all
28racialism is hateful to me; but Botha's speeches are sometimes more
29than even I can stand.
30

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1913:134
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 July 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 July 20th 1913
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I have not answered your last interesting letters because I have been
7too ill to write to any one. Letters mean so much to me in this
8solitary life that I feel it a great loss when I can't write.
9
10 I am very anxious about Mr Sauer. Is it not tragic that the last act
11of our dear friend's political life should have been, if he is taken
12from us, the framing of that native land bill? It runs against all he
13has so faithfully upheld during his life. How little place & power
14look when one approaches the end of the journey. Nothing matters but
15the knowledge that in however small a way one has always fought
16against human injustice & oppression. If only we could awake South
17Africa to see to-day that though for the moment we can refuse the vote
18the right to hold land & nearly all other human rights to the vast
19native population of South Africa the day is coming, in less than 15
20years when the millions will rise up & demand, what we might by
21generously giving them now win their love & gratitude. Dispise not the
22day of small things. A class or a sex or race refused in a so-called
23democratic state under 20th century conditions the right to take its
24share in in the government of the state will ultimately be driven the
25lamentable use of force, & answer repression with resistance which
26must shake society to its foundations. It is hard to leave South
27Africa seeing no little glimmering of the great modern truths among
28its leading people.
29
30 "Oh hadst thou known even more, in this thy day, the things that make
31for thy peace - but now they are hidden from thee!"
32
33 I hope you are keeping well.
34
35 Yours very sincerely
36 Olive Schreiner
37
38 PS. A friend told me the other day that you had become much more
39liberal on the woman question than you used to be. I hope it is true.
40You of all men must know that it is by changing & expanding that we
41live. The doctors say that physically a man or woman is just as old as
42their arteries; when these have hardened & will not expand, we a
43physically old at any age, & while they have the power of expanding &
44changing we are physically young. (I expect your arteries are in a
45very good state, much better than mine!!) So it always seems to ^me^,
46that spiritual & mental old age has come on when we cannot expand
47anymore & modify our ideas.
48
49 To die young is to "die learning." We can't wish anything better for
50ourselves or for those we love. Years do not make age. It is so
51beautiful to me with my old brother Will that he has expanded & grown
52so wonderfully in the last few years. People often say of you "But
53Merriman said this or that ten or twenty years ago!" My answer always
54is - "That is the glory of Merriman, that he is eternally young &
55growing."
56
Notation
The quotation beginning 'Oh hadst thou known even more' cannot be traced but is likely to be from the Bible.

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1913:150
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 25 July 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 Dear Mr Merriman
2
3 Yesterday afternoon came the sad news & at a quarter past two this
4morning I heard the train go past with his body. It was so improbable
5to realize it was Sauers body going by. I would have sat up at the
6station to watch for its coming but I knew Mary would be asleep worn
7out with much watching & sorrow, & I could not see her.
8
9 I deeply sympathize with you in what I know will be a terrible blow.
10Such life long companionship have a thousand cords that death tears
11asunder.
12
13 Thank you for your letter.
14
15 Yours very sincerely
16 Olive Schreiner
17
18 Friday morning
19 July 25th 1913.
20

Letter Reference John X. Merriman MSC 15/1913:320
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 November 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn X. Merriman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Nov 16th 1913
3
4 Dear Mr Merriman
5
6 I was glad indeed to see your remarks on the Indians. Im It is not
7waving their little Union Jacks in the faces of other people that
8makes the true ^& good^ Imperialist; but trying by justice & love to
9draw nearer all the races who make it. With out love & fellow feeling
10Imperialism is a hideous sham.
11
12 I should like much to speak ^write^ on the Indian question, but am not
13able to now
14
15 I am arriving on the 21st in Cape Town & sail for Europe on the 6th of
16Dec to seek medical advice.
17
18 I hope I shall see you to shake hands before I leave.
19
20 Your very sincere, ^& wellintentioned^ if ^if^ "mis-guided" friend,
21 Olive Schreiner
22
23

Letter Reference James Rose Innes MSC 21/2/1895:33
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 September 1895
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJames Rose Innes
Other VersionsRive 1987: 258
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. There is a neatly torn off postscript to this letter, but nothing of it can be read because only the tops of two or three letters remain.
1 The Homestead
2 Aug Sep 2nd 1895
3
4 Dear Mr Innes
5
6 Do come up. It would be of great benefit to the work we all have at
7heart: even it only showed you what really are the conditions under
8which people live here. I wish some of us could give you two thousand
9a year, & say, "Here, devote yourself to politics." I feel a little
10anxious about your having to burn the candle at both ends, but it is
11better to burn out than that smoulder out in a sodden heap! I do think
12that the change up here now the weather is so ideal will do you good,
13& help you to shake off the ill effects of the influenza. Come.
14
15 Yours ever
16 Olive Schreiner
17
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Following this letter in the archive sequence is a letter from S.C. Cronwright-Schreiner, also dated 2 September 1895, saying he will do whatever Innes wants concerning a proposed branch of the Progressive Association, a small group to oppose De Beers and Rhodes, and this is likely to be 'the work we all have at heart' referred to by Schreiner. Letters from Cronwright-Schreiner to Innes continue every two months or so in 1896, at one point every few days, regarding furthering the Progressive cause.

Letter Reference James Rose Innes MSC 21/2/1896:55
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 May 1896
Address FromThe Homestead, Kimberley, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJames Rose Innes
Other VersionsRive 1987: 276-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident in Kimberley from early August 1894 to November 1898.
1 My dear Friend
2
3 What tidings are these that I hear of thee on every hand???
4
5 Since I came out from England primed il with Stead's stories about
6Rhodes as the lover of Humanity, the ideal millionaire-leader-of the
7people, & found when I got to know Rhodes personally, that he was none
8of these things, I shall have had no blow of disappointment equal to
9^that^ which I shall feel, if you really - after all the evidence which
10I know you have in your hand - back up Rhodes & the Chartered Company.
11This is our one chance of crushing the powers which are corrupting our
12public life. Passed it will never come back again.
13
14 If you waver now, it will be to you a life long regret.
15
16 Yours ever
17 Olive Schreiner
18
19 I did not think there would have been any use in your writing to the
20papers now. If you had written during the first six days, or even
21during the first month, while men in the East were uncertaint & their
22opinions wavering - you would have modified all English opinion there,
23& you would have educated the men who were to follow you up to your
24own standard. It's too late now.
25
Notation
Rive's (1987) version of this letter is in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's 1896 letters to Rose Innes are concerned with Innes accepting leadership of the opposition and opposing Rhodes and the Chartered Company in the wake of the Jameson Raid, and also the punitive measures against the Ndebele and Shona which occasioned Schreiner's Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 March 1902
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 232
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand, and is confirmed by the mention of Rhodes’s death two days previously. Schreiner was resident in Hanover from September 1900 to October 1907, after 1902 with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere. The beginning of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
32
4 in I find him pocking about the room with a candle; I asked him what
5he was looking for. He said he was looking the snake which had got out
6of the box while we were at suppers. He couldn't find it, so now we
7have the pleasure of knowing we are living in a box room with a live
8snake, I rather fancy a night-adder!! Cron consoled me by saying "Well
9I don't think it matters much if only you are careful not to get of
10out of bed with your bare feet; always put your slippers on!" which is
11tiny consoling.
12
13 //We heard this morning that Cecil Rhodes died the day before
14yesterday. It was a greater shock to me than I could have supposed
15possible. He was so full of life. When death comes one forgets all the
16faults of a life in its relations to others & remembers only the awful
17tragedy of the individual soul. A great "might have been."
18
19 Good bye darling. I like to think of you & your husband & little boy.
20You are always something beautiful to think of. I expect you have
21written several poems during the last year
22
23^that I have not seen, but shall some day. I have made several
24allegories: but have not written them out. ^
25
26Olive
27
Notation
The particular allegories Schreiner was writing cannot be established, but ‘1899’ could have been one of them. Cronwright-Schreiner’s (1924) version of the letter is incorrect in a number of respects.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Thursday 1906 ; Before End: 1910
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content concerning the women's suffrage campaign.
1 Thursday night
2
3 My darling Anna
4
5 Did you feel how I was loving you as I sat behind you at the meeting.
6I could have kissed your dear little black curl at the back of your
7neck.
8
9 Your paper was lovely dear, so sweet & like yourself, but your way of
10reading it was sweeter. I could have cried while you were reading it.
11I felt sure every one must be falling in love with you. Mrs Solly's
12speech was clever; but after it yours & Mrs Brown's were sweet to me.
13I'll try to come out soon Perhaps Sunday if it's quite fine. Monday &
14Tuesday ^Wednesday^ I am engaged. But the other days are open so far. I
15try to come on Tuesday.
16
17 Wasn't that Irish girl sweet?
18
19 I've been very ill. My heart has not been so bad before. To-day the
20pain is less, & I can see clearer.
21
22 //Margaretha is such a wonderful little person, all other children
23(except Buster) seem so common place beside her; but perhaps my eyes
24are blinded. She's a child one could get to love with an absorbing
25love. Please tell me about Malan's meeting. I hope Mrs M- will not
26spoil it. What does she mean by saying we are going to do something?
27In a country like this where men are even more enlightened & advanced
28on the woman question that women, where everything is advancing so
29wonderfully considering the short time we've been working - what does
30she mean?? We have the wives of two Ministers who will be in the Union
31Parliament on our executive! What more could we expect.
32
33 My darling old boy is looking very well: he plays tennis now as well
34as golf, & it does him much good. But he has to work awfully hard so
35gets little time for reading or writing in the evening. I've not been
36out to the camp since I came.
37
38 Ollie's puppies are so lovely, especially one - with large eyes like
39Netas.
40
41 Good bye dear one. It was so beautiful, so sweet of you to think of
42that pamphlet. You will never know how I prize it. Your love &
43friendship has been so much to me during the last years that I hardly
44know how I should have gone on living here ^in Africa^ without them. It
45all seemed so empty while you were in Europe.
46
47 Good bye.
48 Olive
49
50 Tengo Jabavu is passing tonight but I'm not able to go to the Station
51to meet him.
52
53^Love to you all. My baby will be quite grown when I see her next^
54Olive
55
56Crons still away at de Aar, he returns on Sunday night.
57
Notation
Anna Purcell's paper cannot be traced.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 November 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Nov 16th 1913
3
4 My darling Anna
5
6 I shall arrive in Cape Town on the evening of Friday the 21st if I am
7able to get my packing done. I am going through & burning old letters
8& papers, & its sad work; it's like burning your own heart.
9
10 Dear you'll never know how much your love & friendship has been it to
11me. You came into my life just in the loneliest point, when I most
12needed it
13
14 Good bye, dear.
15
16 I'm so thankful Miss Hobhouse is better. No place would have suited
17her like Bergvleit. Cron tells me there was an account in the papers
18of a meeting at Bergvleit. I didn't see it. I didn't see it. I've not
19read the papers lately I seem to have lost my hold on things.
20
21 Olive
22
23

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateOctober 1914
Address From4 Gloucester Place, Portman Square, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Dear Anna,
2
3 Will you please send the enclosed to Cron. They are beginning to have
4Martial Law here, & often letters &c &c. I am not sure whether any
5letters sent straight to him will reach him if you write to me address
6the envelope to
7
8 c/o Mrs Smith
9 4 Gloucester Place
10 Portman Sq
11 London
12
13 & enclose the closed envelope with my letter addressed to me. & she
14will send it on. Please send the cuttings on to Cron too & if I send
15you any news papers please send them on too.
16
17 I think I have at last found a place of refuge, a tiny flat in Chelsea
18- but I'm not quite sure I shall be able to get it. in this war The
19war fever here is worse than in the Boer war; it is madness. The more
20terrified the people get the more cruel they they get.
21
22 I hope you are all well. Don't forget me & write to me.
23
24 I'm trying to write an article, & will send it you if any paper will
25publish it. People don't want to hear the truth any more than they did
26in the Boer war.
27
28 Love to you all
29 Olive
30
31^You can read my letter to Cron & then put it with cutting. Please send
32me a post card to say you have this.^
33
Notation
The article Schreiner refers to cannot be established, but could have been the never comppleted 'The Dawn of Civilization', which she appears to have begun at around this time, or one of her wartime allegories.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateDecember 1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Address c/o Standard Bank
2 10 Clements Lane
3 Lombard St
4 London
5
6 Anna dear,
7
8 I hope your are all having a happy Xmas. My love to you all. I am
9still a Kensington Ma Palace Mansions, de Vere Gardens, but am trying
10to get rooms at Hampstead, somewhere where I could get food I can eat,
11& I'm freer. You were quite right about the terrible food in London
12boarding houses! You see I nearly always lived in my old little rooms
13when I was in London before, & then one can live very cheaply & very
14well. I've not tasted a decent mouth full of food since I left the
15Continent. Of course there is no possibility of getting to Italy or
16Switzerland for so I am staying on here for the winter. We are having
17a strangely dark foggie rainy winter, the papers say the rain fall is
18than it has been in London for many years. I hardly ever see any one I
19live alone in this little room. Of course I am quite out of the
20fashion now - no one wants to have anything to do with me, except my
21beloved faithful beautiful Adela, & oh Anna I know you will be sorry
22to hear, she has consumption. Her right lung is infected No one is to
23be allowed to see her for two months except her husband. She is being
24moved up to Hampstead for clearer air. Oh she has been like an angel
25to me: The one thing in all my illness I have to cling to. She came
26twice a week to see me while she could. I feel very helpless about my
27dear angel. Her little Olive has grown into such a lovely child. The
28other two are ordinary nice children. My fear is that Olive will
29inherit her mother's constitution. The only person I have seen in the
30last two weeks except doctors is Dolly Radford, a beautiful little
31woman who writes poems. We were friends as girls 25 years ago. No war
32or blood shed changes her dear loving heart.
33
34 Give my love to your mother & Joy, & the children & your husband, to
35your sister Frances if you write to her. I'm sure she & I would have
36become great friends if I could have seen more of her.
37
38 How is dear Lucy Molteno's health? Please unreadable I seem to have no
39news of any of you. You will all be will all be very glad Beyers is
40dead & de Wet & the others prisoners. I hear the British are going to
41call a war ship after Botha, which is very right.
42
43 Good bye dear. Don't quite forget me
44 Olive
45
46 There is practically no woman's movement here any more nor any
47interest in any thing but the war. I've not seen Ursula or Oliver for
48two months.
49

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 November 1919
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 Nov 20th 1919
2
3 My darling darling Anna
4
5 Cron has just sent me your two letters to him. Oh if I could be with
6you, dear, that's my one feeling; it's so hard be be so far from you.
7
8 Yes, how he will always seem to us who knew him a part of the veld &
9of nature. He You know the Grammarian's Funeral is the poem I love
10best in the world. My dear little sister-in-law you will have seen by
11this time. She feels Wills death very terribly. My heart seems to
12cling to her more than any humanbeing in the world now Will has gone,
13& all the people who made my childhood & youth have passed away. Do
14ask Walter to write & tell me all your news, if you don't feel
15
16^able to^
17
18Olive
19
20 ^The winter here is very terrible.^
21
Notation
Schreiner's reference is to Robert Browning's 'The Grammarian's Funeral' in his (1911) Men and Women Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Anna Purcell MSC 26/2.9.8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1907 ; Before End: 1918
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToAnna Purcell nee Cambier Faure
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to content, as after when Schreiner and Anna Purcell became friends and before the death of Frederick Purcell in 1919. The beginning of the letter is missing.
1[page/s missing]
2
3 & your husband had been able to meet her & some of my other friends I
4know you would have loved them. Send the letters on to Mrs Brown & ask
5her to return them to me.
6
7 I've something else I want to write to you about but will do so when
8I'm fitter. It's nice to think little Magraretha will grow up in a
9larger freer world than we did.
10
11 Things will be very different in 20 years time. I fix my thoughts on
12the future, even the very far future which is yet so near in the life
13of the race, when so many will reach what we have only dreamed of.
14
15 Olive
16
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Frederic Chapman MSC 26/14.1/1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: December 1888 ; Before End: March 1889
Address FromHotel du Parc, Mentone, France
Address To
Who ToFrederic Chapman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner stayed in Mentone from mid December 1888 to mid March 1889.
1 Hotel du Park
2 Mentone
3
4 Dear Mr Chapman
5
6 My brother has forwarded me the enclosed. Would you not kindly make
7arrangements with him taking ten per cent of what ever he gives for
8the trouble? It would be such a trouble for me to arrange being here.
9I found the other proposed translator was a quite in-competent person,
10& wanted, moreover, to leave parts of the book out. Of course, I would
11oppose any translation that was not literal.
12
13 I have made arrangements with a very able translator in Dres-den, &
14the work will be published in Germany in two months time.
15
16 I like the look of the cheap edition of S.A.F. & trust it will sell
17well.
18
19 I am very well, & am getting ready all kinds of work.
20
21 If you should not feel inclined to trouble with the translator would
22you kindly refer him to me.
23
24 Yours faithfully
25 Olive Schreiner
26
27
28
Notation
'The enclosed' is no longer attached to this letter.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Dollie Radford MSC 26/2.10.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: March 1890 ; Before End: December 1892
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToDollie Radford nee Maitland
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to when Schreiner was resident in Matjesfontein at a point when Radford had young children. Schreiner was mainly resident in Matjesfontein from March 1890 to December 1892, with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere, including Cape Town.
1 My dear Dolly Radford
2
3 Thank you for your beautiful little poem to me. I only found it last
4night in bed, because the last leaves had stuck together. I thought
5how suddenly the last poem ended & then I turned the leaves & found it.
6 Thank you: your love & sympathy is so much to me because I have seen
7you; & you have always been one of the people I have wanted to know
8more of & for some reason have fancied did not feel drawn to me as I
9to you. Will you not send me your likeness. I would the old one with
10your first baby if you have not another good one.
11
12 Good bye Thank you, from my heart
13
14 Olive Schreiner
15
16^Address^
17Matjesfontein
18
Notation
Dollie Radford was an established poet and although a number of her collections were published the particular poems referred to cannot be established.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Dollie Radford MSC 26/2.10.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Thursday May 1914 ; Before End: September 1914
Address FromNew College, Eastbourne, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToDollie Radford nee Maitland
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The May to September date range has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is written on printed headed paper.
1 New College, Eastbourne, Limited.
2 Eastbourne
3 Thursday
4
5 Dear Dolly Radford
6
7 I shall be so glad to meet you. Could you come next Saturday afternoon
8about 4 or Sunday about the same time to 9 St Mary's Terrace,
9Paddington. I shall be up in London then. I fear I can't come to
10Harrow but I hope you will be able to come. I'm not fit yet.
11
12 Yours sincerely
13 Olive Schreiner
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Dollie Radford MSC 26/2.10.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 28 May 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToDollie Radford nee Maitland
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace
2 Kensington
3 Thursday
4
5 Dear Dollie Radford
6
7 I have wanted for so many years to see you. I can't travel by tube on
8account of my heart, & am leaving for ^Bad^ Nauheim in Germany next
9Tuesday Perhaps we shall have to put off our meeting till my return.
10If your house is close to the train ^omnibus^ perhaps I might run up
11when I have a little spare time & take my chance of finding you in. I
12am so uncertain as to health that I can't make sure appointments.
13
14 I wonder if you would tell me anything about Eleanor Marx's last years
15& death? No one I have ever met could. Did you see her near the end?
16
17 Yours always
18 Olive Schreiner
19

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Dollie Radford MSC 26/2.10.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 June 1914
Address FromHotel Augusta Victoria, Bad Nauheim, Germany
Address To
Who ToDollie Radford nee Maitland
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 Hotel Augusta Victoria
2 Bad Nauheim
3 June 28th 1914
4
5 Dear Dolly
6
7 I wasnt able to see you when I was in London, I was too ill. I'm much
8better now. I'm taking the heart cure here. When I return to London
9I'm going to find rooms in some quiet part. Are there any not
10expensive apartments to be had near you? It would be so nice to be
11near you: but I must be quite close to the om buses as I'm not able to
12climb. I'll be here for some weeks longer; my permanent London address is
13
14 c/o Standard Bank
15 10 Clements Lane
16 London
17 W
18 Lombard Street

19 London C
20
21 Please if you write after I've left this write there. I do long so to
22talk about Eleanor to you. I've never been able to hear a word about
23her last years from any one.
24
25 It will be so nice to see you again. They all tell me you are so
26unchanged
27
28 Yours ever
29 Olive Schreiner
30

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Friday 1914 ; Before End: 1916
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to the range of years when Schreiner was intermittently resident at St Mary Abbotts Terrace. The letter has been scored through on each sheet in a hand likely to be that of Cronwright-Schreiner.
1 30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace
2 Kensington
3 Friday
4
5 Dear Mr Lloyd
6
7 I know how busy you must be but I should like very much to meet you. I
8wonder if you could come & see me here some evening. I am living in
9one little room on the third floor, which is bedroom study kitchen &
10all the rest in one - but you won't mind that. If your musical women
11friend whom you told me of could come with you I should be very glad
12to see her. If you can't come here perhaps I could manage to come up &
13meet you somewhere. I am anxious to hear just what you are doing & if
14I could help your ^action^ in any way.
15
16 If ever you should hear of a small flat or rooms up your way you might
17let me know. The difficulty is the flat must be sunny & airy & near to
18the bus as I can't walk much & I cant go be under ground. Don't look
19for them please, but if you come across one ^&^ let me know I should be
20glad. I had a delightful half hour with dear old Edward last week.
21
22 Yours most sincerely
23 Olive Schreiner
24
25
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 30 July 1915
Address FromLlandrindod Wells, Wales
Address To
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 c/o Dr Parker
2 Llandrindod Wells
3 Wales
4 Friday
5
6 Dear Mr Lloyd
7
8 I have just got your letter. Had I heard about yours friends rooms I
9should certainly have gone to see them before I left London. Now I am
10here, & shall be staying here for some time if it suits me. Does your
11friend want to let the rooms at once; or might they still be free if I
12come later? I could not take them without having seen them - that is
13the pity, because some places I can't breathe in,. & I is it near a
14bus that comes to London? It would be so very nice if I could take
15them. I would If I can't take them, but know of a nice woman who would
16take care of her furniture &c would she like me to tell her of the
17rooms? I have a friend from the Cape shortly coming to London whom
18they might suit. I am just having a dress made here, just because the
19man is a German (naturalized) but because of his German name no one
20has gone to him for months so I at once went & ordered a dress.,
21^though I cant afford it.^ One can't get away from the sorrow of the war
22even here. There is just the same hatred & bitterness as in London.
23
24 I am staying with friends here so for me its very delightful. I shall
25be so glad to meet you again when I come later to London. It will be
26good to have some one who can understand to talk to. I did not see or
27hear from Kate Salt after that evening you were there together. I hope
28your friend will have a safe journey to Germany & soon return.
29
30 What are the terms for your friend's room? Are they in a pretty airy
31open place?
32
33 Yours sincerely
34 Olive Schreiner
35

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 24 February 1916
Address FromAlexi, The Park, Hampstead, London
Address To27 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, London
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this letter is derived from the postmark on an attached envelope, which also provides the address it was sent to.
1 Alexi
2 31 The Park
3 Hampstead
4 Thursday
5
6 Dear Mr Lloyd
7
8 I wrote to you to the Hampstead address Edward Carpenter gave me to
9ask if you could come & see me but the letter was returned as not
10known at that address. I don't know if you are far from this. This
11house is near Golders Green about half way down from the Bull & Bush.
12Its close to Golders Green station about 4 turning off on the right
13side as you walk up from Golders Green station towards the top of
14Hampstead where the ponds are & Jack Straws Castle. If you could come
15& see me I would be so glad The evening would do. I much wish to have
16a talk with you.
17
18 Yours faithfully
19 Olive Schreiner
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 7 March 1916
Address FromAlexi, The Park, Hampstead, London
Address To
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this letter is provided by the postmark on an attached envelope.
1 Alexi
2 31 The Park
3 Hampstead
4 Monday
5
6 Dear Mr Lloyd
7
8 Thank you for your letter. The reason I was so anxious to see you,
9apart from the pleasure of a talk with you - was that I have written a
10tiny thing, & I wanted you to to read it & give me your true opinion
11on it. Its from the standpoint of the Con. Objector & your advice
12would be valuable to me. If you can come, please do, but not if it
13puts out other more important work or is taxing you to too much It
14would only take you three minutes to read it, but I want to take talk
15it over with some one who knows more about the condition of affairs
16^exactly^ than I do.
17
18 Yours very sincerely
19 Olive Schreiner
20
21 I am staying now in the house of my friend the Countess Batthyany a
22great pacifist - but all the family are away in Dorset, except one son,
23 so I am practically here alone.
24
Notation
The 'tiny thing' referred to is likely to be: "To Our Anti-Militarists, By Olive Schreiner" Labour Leader 16 March 1916, p.6.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter DateWednesday 9 March 1916
Address FromAlexi, The Park, Hampstead, London
Address To27 Clements Lane, Lombard Street, London
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front.
1 I shall be in on Saturday or Sunday evening after 7 30 if that will do
2for the music? Let me know which time suits.
3
4OS
5
631 The Park
7Hampstead
8Wednesday
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 13 March 1916
Address FromAlexi, 31 The Park, Hampstead, London
Address To
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 "Alexi"
2 31 The Park
3 Hampstead
4 Monday
5
6 My dear Mr Lloyd
7
8 I was indeed grieved last night when I came in & found you had just
9been. As I did not get an answer from you on Saturday night I made
10sure you would not be coming. I ought to have asked again on my post
11card that you should let me know. I am especially grieved about your
12friend because she had perhaps far to come. Her music would have been
13such a joy to me at this sad time when one needs all that is joyful &
14heart strengthening Please tell her how sorry I am.
15
16 Yours very sincerely
17 Olive Schreiner
18
19 Could you come some other time but let me know before hand.
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: E.B. Lloyd MSC 26/2.4.7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 10 April 1916
Address FromAlexi, 31 The Park, Hampstead, London
Address To
Who ToE. Bertram Lloyd
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 "Alexi"
2 31 The Park
3 Hampstead
4 Monday
5
6 Dear Mr Lloyd
7
8 DIf you & your friend could come about 5 on Saturday I should be so
9glad. I shall have to go to lunch in London. But will be back before 5
10if there is any hope of seeing you. I should so love to hear your
11friend play & to meet her. I thought the meeting fine on Saturday.
12Clifford Allens speech was splendid. His whole personality impresses
13one with such rare sincerity.
14
15 I wonder if you've heard whether Edward is coming on the 12th.
16
17 Yours very sincerely
18 Olive Schreiner
19
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date6 July 1909
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced.
1 De Aar
2 July 6th 1909
3
4 Dear Jessie
5
6 Thank you for your letter. I have written to Mr Cross about Meredith.
7I would have written to you long ago, but of late my heart has been so
8bad I've not been able to write even letters, & that seems to cut one
9off so from one's friends. I wish sometimes when I am in Cape Town you
10could be there too. That seems the only way in which we shall ever
11meet.
12
13 Did I tell you about Dots visit? She has grown such a splendid girl so
14developed & strong & beautiful in mind & character. I fancy it will be
15a little hard for her just at present to come & settle down at the
16Cape. But she will make a world & work for herself wherever she may be.
17 She is passionately devoted to her father & will throw her dear self
18into his life. I do hope she won't marry soon. I'm so glad Dorothy is
19going to have another little one. A woman's life must have beauty in
20it who has children. I find a great deal of happiness in loving the
21children of my friends.
22
23 Oh Jessie, I am so unhappy about South Africa. I can see such a dark
24future of continual regression & the oppression of the weaker races.
25And I am so broken I can't even try to do anything to help them!
26Sometimes for weeks together I can hardly dress myself or walk about;
27it is all such a battle.
28
29 Do you know anything of a Dr "Boyd" in Potchefstroom? They say he
30practises a wonderful system of curing or remedying heart disease by
31electric treatment of the nose! It seems most strange; but a friend of
32mine in England who was completely broken down, has been almost quite
33cured by it! She thought she would never do anything again, & all the
34doctors said there was no hope, & now she has written a whole novel,
35in eight months & is quite her old self again. But she is never
36allowed to get up before twelve o'clock, & does all her writing in bed.
37
38 How is the woman's movement getting on in Pretoria. We are doing
39splendidly in Cape Town Mrs Murray (Dr Murray of Kenilworth's wife) is
40now our president. Mrs F.S. Malan & Mrs Sauer are Vice-Presidents.
41
42 Good bye, dear. Write to me when the spirit moves you.
43
44 Olive
45
46 Where is Mrs Chap now? Has she any more children?
47
48
49

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday 16 December 1909
Address FromYork House, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced. The date has been written on the letter in an unknown hand.
1 c/o Dr. Purcell
2 Muizenberg
3 Thursday
4
5 Dear Jessie,
6
7 I was too unwell to leave & have been staying here with my dear
8friends the Purcells. I shant be going up till the first.
9
10 Will you be able to come to our drawing-room meeting on the 20th at 3.
1115. It would be so lovely to see you. Professor Fremantle & Mrs
12Alexander
will be the speakers.
13
14 Cron is coming down for Xmas & then I'm going back as far as
15Matjesfontein where I shall have to stay until it gets a little cooler
16at de Aar.
17
18 I do so want to see you again. It was lovely like old times to see you
19again.
20
21 Olive
22
23
24

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 December 1909
Address FromYork House, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced. The year has been written on the letter in an unknown hand.
1 c/o Dr. Purcell
2 York House
3 Muizenberg
4
5 Xmas Day.
6
7 Dear Jessie
8
9 It was a great disappointment to me to hear from Anna Purcell that you
10were going to be at Uitkyk this week. I had so hoped when I was better
11I would be able to come & see you again.
12
13 I am leaving for Matjesfontein on Wednesday as the Purcells are
14returning to Bergvleit on Friday, & will be busy packing Thursday. It
15does seem hard I havent been able to see anything of you. It may be
16the only chance I have for years. If I feel able I think I'll run in
17to Mrs Moffat's tomorrow (Sunday) & take my chance of finding you
18there. But I fear you may be staying somewhere else. I wish you could
19have come to our meeting; it was very interesting. We had over 60
20visitors that afternoon, & Mrs Alexander's speech was very good. She
21is a wonderful speaker. Cron has not come down for Xmas. He's been too
22busy. Do let me know when you pass Matjesfontein that I may have a
23peep at you.
24
25 I shall be staying in two little rooms by myself & doing my cooking on
26a spirit lamp as the hotel is closed or I'd beg you to try & come &
27spend a day with me on your way up. If I find the heat at
28Matjesfontein too much, I shall go on at the end of the month & stay
29with my friends the Haldane Murrays near Graaff-Reinet. It's terribly
30hard to find a cool place in summer in this country.
31
32 Good bye, dear.
33
34 I hope you're having a real good time. It was nice seeing you looking
35so young and well.
36
37 Thine ever
38 Olive
39
40
41

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 January 1910
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced.
1 Matjesfontein
2 Jan. 3rd 1909 1910
3
4 My dear Jessie
5
6 I have been trying to make that milk you told me of but it doesn't
7come right. Perhaps I have not read the instructions which are in
8French right. How much powder must I add to a bottle of milk? Must I
9let the milk boil first or take it off the (fire) before it quite
10boils? I have the feeling it would do me much good if I could make it.
11Since my heart has got so bad I can't eat meat, & I can hardly eat
12anything at all.
13
14 I was ill all the time at Muizenberg, but I have got worse since I got
15here. I shall try a week or ten days longer, & then if I'm not better
16I shall go on to Graaf Reinet to stay with my friends the Haldane
17Murray's
whose farm is high up in the mountains & said to be always
18cool even in summer. But I can't bear going so far away from my
19husband. Here I know if he were ill or needed me I could get to him in
20twelve hours at any time.
21
22 I hope you are having a good time in Cape Town among old friends. It
23was so hard I wasn't able to come & see you, but I couldn't get out.
24It was such a disappointment to me not to see more of you, because my
25coming to Pretoria seems like a beautiful dream never to be realized.
26
27 I'm glad you had that little time with Mary at Uyitkyk even though it
28prevented my having you. She's just the same dear, beautiful pure soul
29as ever. But I seem so seldom able to see her. Matjesfontein is very
30sad now, all going to the dogs. Logan looks very ill. The hotel is so
31kept no one can stay there, only the barman & his wife there, & I
32don't think they want people. I have passed days here without seeing a
33human face, or hearing a human voice except when the boy brings my
34milk. It seems like a dying place.
35
36 Good bye, dear. It was sweet to have that peep of you. You look so
37young & fine.
38 Olive
39
40 Give my love to your husband. I was so sorry I couldn't get over to
41the station to see him.
42
43
44

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 23 January 1910
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced. The date has been written on the letter in an unknown hand. Content indicates Schreiner was in Cape Town when she wrote it.
1 Sunday morning
2
3 Darling Jessie
4
5 It was so good to see you. I am just going ^out^ to Sea Point to see if
6I can find a room there where I can breathe. What day would you be
7home if I came out in the morning. The only place I can breathe is
8driving about on the top of trams so I could come, but don't stay in
9for me. Because I'm uncertain
. I want to see you again
10
11 Olive
12
13 It was lovely to see you both looking so young & happy. My love to
14your husband.
15
16
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 January 1910
Address FromRocklands, Beach Road, Sea Point, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced.
1 Rocklands
2 (Private Hotel)
3 Sea Point
4Jan 26th 1910
5
6 Dear Jessie
7
8 I've found such delightful quarters. On Sunday I was very bad quite
9collapsed, but my dear friend Ruth Alexander came to see (me) in the
10afternoon, they took a taxi-cab, & drove me round Sea Point & Camp's
11Bay & then took me to their house where I have been since. Yesterday
12she came with me & we found this nice room, quite charming. I slept
13splendidly here last night, & am much better this morning. I wonder
14sometimes why I always have such good kind friends who do so much for
15me. I wish you knew Ruth Alexander She's one of the most remarkable
16young women in South Africa. Her father was a professor at Cambridge
17for many years, & she has been married now for three years to a young
18barrister called Alexander who's a member of parliament. I fancy she's
19rather lonely here, because the Jews among whom she is thrown here are
20a rather different stamp from the Jews of high culture among whom she
21grew up. I think all very thoughtful intellectual women are a little
22lonely when they first come out here. She's a wonderful public speaker
23with a calm slow style something like Sauer, but with a passionate
24intensity of feeling below that Sauer hasn't got.
25
26 Do come & see me here if you can spare time; but I know so well how
27full one's time is as ones stay here draws to an end. It is so sweet
28of you to want me to come up to you at Pretoria. Perhaps I shall
29realize the dream someday. The doctors say I must never go up high
30again, but there are so many things besides simple height, to be taken
31into account, even with the heart Hudson Findlay & his wife want me to
32come & stay with them on their farm at Ermelo & Isie Smuts wants me to
33come & visit them at Irene, so perhaps I'll come & visit you all; but
34just for the present I must lie still. I've written to Mrs Palmgren
35Office of Union (Castle) Company Adderly Street. But she has not yet
36answered. Is the address right?
37
38 Good bye. It is cheering to see you two folks look so well.
39
40 Thine ever
41 Olive
42
43
44

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1 January 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgware Rd
3 London W
4 New Year's Day 1920
5
6 A happy new year to you, dear. I've never had a word of news from, or
7of you since I last saw you here. I suppose you are back in the old
8home leading the old life - such a beautiful life compared to the
9nightmare of cold & bad food & other things harder - in which we are
10living here
11
12 Have you news of my darling Dorothy? I am going to send her a card, it
13will surely get through now the "peace" has come. Such a "peace"!!! Do
14write & tell me all about yourself. I saw so little of you; but so it
15is always when one is in London. Friends never seem peacefully to see
16each other & be happy together in the way we are in old Africa. I
17often think of those long drives & teas out on the beach we had when I
18stayed with you. It all seems like a dream.
19
20 Did you see Dot before she left? And have you seen Ursie? I like her
21husband so much. As for Oliver's wife I love her as if she were my
22child. The more you know her the more she draws you to her. Her little
23baby comes next month. It is so terrible that they are going back to
24Africa in September, for me, who will be absolutely alone on this side
25of the world - but they will gain. England is very terrible, food gets
26worse & dearer & dearer. We have had 1oz. of butter a week, but now we
27are to get none! Things have never been as bad as they are now except
28for the very rich who can get everything. Everything has gone up in
29price in the last three months.
30
31 Does you ever see Mary Sauer? Ruth Alexander has promised to come &
32see me on her way back from America & oh how I long to see her. One
33has to lead the lonely life one does here to know how one longs for
34one's old friends: & there's no chance of ones getting to Italy or
35Nauheim things are too dear.
36
37 Remember me to dear Sir James, & ask him if he has read a splendid
38book I've just finished --- "The Economic Consequences of the Peace",
39by Keynes. Also a very good book (though not in the same street)
40Dillon's "Peace Conference". I think he would like both. Do you see
41much of dear old Merriman? Remember me to him.
42
43 Good bye dear. All the best for the coming year
44 Olive
45
46
47
Notation
The books referred to are: John Maynard Keynes (1919) The Economic Consequences of the Peace London: Macmillan; Emile Joseph Dillon (1919) The Peace Conference London: Hutchinson.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date28 March 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgware Rd.
3 March 28th 1920
4
5 Dear Jessie
6
7 I know you are feeling anxious about our Dorothy. I have written her a
8postcard & hope to get a reply. Oh God what a world this is!
9
10 I am going to try & come out to Africa when Oliver & his wife come out
11in August. It is my last chance as I cannot travel alone.
12
13 The doctors say it is madness for me to try to go to a hot climate,
14but I would rather end my life (in) my own country & among my own
15people.
16
17 I hope you like your new home. That always seemed to me rather a damp
18sad part - but you will make any place beautiful if you take it in
19hand.
20
21 Have you heard that Dot is expecting her baby in July? She will go
22down to Dar-es-Sallem to have it, as there is a good hospital there &
23she can have two doctors. But I am very anxious about her in that hot
24climate.
25
26 I hear from Mrs. Hudson Findlay that her son is engaged to a very nice
27girl called Joan Rose-Innes. So I expect she is some relation of your
28husband's. We are becoming quite "familie" what with Edna & her.
29George's father is my nephew. George is a very clever brilliant
30delightful fellow I believe. Edna, Oliver's wife is a charming
31delightful person, every one loves her. Their little baby girl is
32delightful.
33
34 I am expecting Ruth Alexander here next week. Oh it will be so good to
35see her. I am so utterly alone here & now I cannot walk without
36bringing on the attacks of angina I can get out little.
37
38 Give me any news you have of Dorothy in case I don't hear from her.
39
40 My love to you
41 Olive
42
43
44

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.9
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 April 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced.
1 9 Porchester Place
2 Edgware Rd.
3 April 26th 1920
4
5 Dear Jessie,
6
7 I was so glad to get a letter from Dorothy yesterday, & to hear it was
8all going fairly well with them, & that she was hoping to go out to
9Africa next Jan. with the two youngest children. One cannot help
10feeling anxious about friends on the continent in these times.
11
12 I hope you are liking your new house & not finding it too old; I'm
13sure you'll make it lovely.
14
15 I'm hoping to come out to Africa in Aug. when Oliver and his wife go
16out. But sometimes I feel that it's only a dream that won't be
17realized. I am getting quickly worse, but it may be if this terrible
18damp spring is over one may pull up. Its the dampest spring known in
19England for over 50 years: it pours & pours, all the country is under
20water. The worst rainy winter in Cape Town is heaven to this. You seem
21to breathe water not air, & its very bad for the crops --- which is
22serious.
23
24 I wonder if you've seen Cron? I've just had a very interesting letter
25from Dot. You know she expects her baby at the end of July.
26
27 Dear little Edna is still in the nursing home, suffering terribly with
28her breast. I think the doctor badly mismanaged it. Her baby is two &
29a half months old. It is a lovely babe, very like its sweet mother.
30
31 Goodbye, dear.
32
33 Greetings to Sir James. It will be so beautiful if I can see you all
34again.
35
36 Olive
37
38 Ruth Alexander has been here for two weeks. She comes to see me every
39day: it has been such a joy.
40
41
42

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.10
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Thursday October 1920 ; Before End: November 1920
Address FromOak Hall, Wynburg, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced. The date has been written on the letter in an unknown hand.
1 Oak Hall
2 Tramway Terminus
3 Wynburg
4 Thursday
5
6 Dear Jessie, I'm so glad to think you've come back again. I hope
7you've had a good time up in Pretoria. I am staying here now, as this
8is the only place in the whole of Cape Town & suburbs I have been able
9to find.
10
11 When do (you) expect Dorothy? I am looking forward so much to seeing
12her. Have you & Sir James read a book called "The Rising Tide of
13Colour", by Stoddard? I disagree with him entirely as to the absolute
14inferiority of African races. But there is much truth in his views in
15the first part of the book as to the race suicide of this war as
16regards white races.
17
18 Things seem to me very bad out here. I am much distressed about the
19native question. I feel I made the mistake of my life in coming out
20here. But now I am here I can't go back. All is so changed, all or
21almost all one's old friends gone. One clings the closer to the few
22that are left.
23
24 You will be sorry to hear that Anna Purcell's sister Joey Smuts has to
25undergo a terrible operation today. Oh in a world with so much
26physical anguish in it why need we torture & hate each other.
27
28 Life is so short, there's only time for loving & helping in it.
29
30 Good bye dear
31 Olive
32
33 I lunched with the Charles Moltenos yesterday to meet the Goodenoughs:
34they are charming people. She's a cousin of Bertrand Russell's. I was
35delighted to find that dear old Charley Molteno takes a very
36enlightened view of the native question.
37
38
39
Notation
The book referred to is: Theodore Lothrop Stoddard (1920) The Rising Tide of Colour Against White World-Supremacy New York: Blue Ribbon Books.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Jessie Rose Innes MSC 26/2.6.11
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateFriday 26 November 1920
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJessie Rose Innes nee Dods Pringle
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. A typed transcript only of this letter is available; the original cannot be traced. The date has been written on the letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner stayed with her niece Ursula Scott, her sister-in-law Fan Schreiner, and her friend Lucy Molteno, in Cape Town after her arrival from Britain on 30 August 1920, moving to a boarding-house in Wynberg in late October, where she was resident until her death on 11 December 1920.
1 Friday
2
3Dear Jessie
4
5 Just a word to tell you how I enjoyed my stay with you, & how much
6your kindness touched me. As one gets to the end of the journey one
7feels that nothing but love & fellowship matters. If I had known I
8would be so bad I would not have gone to you, but I thought I should
9be so well in your beautiful big house.
10
11 It wasn't the house that made me bad because I'm just the same here I
12have to sit up all night.
13
14 I did enjoy reading those Fortnightlys which Ive not seen since I came
15to Africa & so very very much meeting Mrs. Bowlas.
16
17 Goodbye
18 Olive
19
20
21

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 30 April 1881
Address FromCockburn Hotel, Edinburgh
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToJohn Brown
Other VersionsRive 1987: 32
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The attached envelope provides the address it was sent to.
1 Cockburn Hotel
2 Edinburgh
3 Saturday Morning
4
5 My dear Dr. Brown
6
7 Thanks for letter & the information. It makes the temptation greater
8than ever, but I think I shall go through with the two years of
9nursing first. I'm so old now that two years won't make much
10difference.
11
12 Thanks for having written to my brother.
13
14 I'm sorry I troubled you with telegram about my box this morning. Just
15after I sent it I went down again to the railway station, & after
16hunting about for half an hour we found it among the luggage that came
17by this morning's train. I found out that I had some one else's box at
18Skipton.
19
20 Dr McDonald is out in the country so I've not been able to see
21Jex-Blake.
22
23 With kindest regards to all.
24
25 I remain,
26 Yours faithfully
27 Olive Schreiner
28
29
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 May 1881
Address FromNew College, Eastbourne, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToJohn Brown
Other VersionsRive 1987: 32-3
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Rive’s (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.
1 New College
2 Eastbourne
3 May 5th 1881
4
5 My dear Dr. Brown,
6
7 You see I have followed your advice for the second-time. Here I am at
8Eastbourne, & am going to begin my studies as soon as possible.
9
10 My brother arrived in Edinburgh on Tues-day evening. I should like to
11have rem-ain-ed my month out at the Infirmary, but he said I was I was
12not well, & brought me down with him, goods & all.
13
14 I don't think I shall go in for the London University exams, as that
15would take me longer, & I am in a hurry. My generous old brother says
16I needn't be, of course, but I am.
17
18 It's awfully good of you to have taken so much trouble about me. I
19hope my health will remain good enough for me to justify all
20expectations, but I have half a fear I shall find myself a great fool
21when I come to measure myself mind by mind with other people.
22
23 Give my best love to Mrs Brown: tell her I liked the work at the
24Infirmary much, liked Miss Pringle, & liked best of all Miss Spencer.
25
26 Your sister wrote me a very kind note which I got the evening before I
27left. I was very sorry I had not time to go & see her
28
29 I am yours in haste & with many thanks
30
31 Olive Schreiner
32

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date11 April 1887
Address FromAlassio, Italy
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other VersionsRive 1987: 125-6
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date is provided by the hotel stamp on this postcard and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front. Schreiner stayed in a number of hotels in Alassio in March, April and early May 1887.
1 I'm sending you a pamphlet on 'Sex & Socialism" by Professor Pearson.
2Tell me what you think of it? It's so beautiful & rest-ful here. My
3nightmare is that I wake up with a start in the night & fancy I'm in
4England & then I remember I'm here with the beautiful sunshine & the
5quiet. It seems as if I were drinking in rest & quiet here, as a
6person dying of hunger would drink in nurishment Have you ever felt
7like that.
8
9 Olive
10
Notation
The pamphlet referred to is: Karl Pearson (1887) Socialism and Sex London: W. Rives. Rive's (1987) version of this postcard is in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter DateSunday 30 April 1888
Address FromPisa, Italy
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other VersionsRive 1987: 140
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date is provided by the postmark on this postcard and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front.
1 Pisa
2 Italy
3 Sunday night
4
5 Have been meaning to write for so long. Left Alassio today, & am on my
6way to Venice. Have just been to see the Leaning Tower, which is
7splendid. Am going on tomorrow to Bologna. No place is so delightful
8as my peaceful little Alassio I'm writing this because I long to know
9how you all are. I don't forget you.
10
11 Olive
12
Notation
Rive's (1987) version of this postcard has been misdated, omits part of the message and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.5A
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 March 1889
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToJohn Brown and Mary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been dated approximately by reference to content.
1 Will you, please, send to Robert Brothers, the large full face photo
2you have? It's the only copy. They'll send it back all right. I didn't
3like to refuse them because they've been so generous to me they've
4just sent me a cheque for £20 & they didn't need to send me anything.
5I would send a stamp but haven't got any English stamps. It would be a
6great favour if you would let them have your little photo. You'll see
7a little dream in next weeks Woman's penny paper that I think you'll
8like
9
10 It will be splendid to have you a little in London. Thank you for the
11poem.
12
13 Ah, that old poem that you sent me at Colesberg!
14
15 My love to you both.
16 Olive
17
18 ^I've written them a few details I don't mind their having. What do
19people want with the author, it is only the work that matters.
20
21 Address please
22 Robert Bro
23 Publishers
24 Boston
25 I've forgotten the number.^
26
Notation
The ‘dream’ referred to which was to be published in the Women’s Penny Paper is: "Life's Gifts" Women's Penny Paper vol 1 no 47, 14 September 1889, p.7.

This letter concerns an attached letter from Roberts Brothers to Olive Schreiner asking for a photograph and a biographical sketch of her for the ‘Book Buyer’, and also to a newspaper clipping. Schreiner’s final insertion is written on the back of the Roberts Brothers letter. These attachments are as follows:

Robert Brothers Publishers
Boston Nov 5 1888

Miss Schreiner

The Last “Book Buyer” wh. we mail you, wants to get a similar sketch of you, with a Portrait, to publish in their ?opening no. Of course all this is good advertising for the “Story of An African Farm” which forms one of the three books constituting the “Heretical Literary Trinity” and we hope you will send us details of your life sufficient to let our public ^know^ who you are, with a photograph. We suppose if we get this by Dec 1 it will be in time for the Jany no. We have sold two Editions of your book & the third is printing.

Yours truly
Robert Bros

March 26th, 1889.
One of the most fascinating personalities in literary London is that of Miss Olive Schreiner, who has already given us a spiritual autobiography in “The Story of An African Farm,” perhaps one of the most surprising bits of intense writing in the English language. Miss Schreiner has now added a short autobiography to the February number of the Book Buyer, in which she says: - “I was many years old before I saw a town. My father is dead. My mother has become a Roman Catholic, and is living in a convent in South Africa. I began ‘An African Farm’ when I was almost a child, but left it for some years before I finished it.” In person Miss Schreiner is a tiny, handsome creature. Her small form seems too slight a shrine for the spiritual struggles she records in the “Story of an African Farm.”









Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date14 February 1889
Address FromHotel du Parc, Mentone, France
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other VersionsRive 1987: 148
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front.
1 I have almost given up writing letters at all now I'm so busy. I'm
2going to send you the Prelude to one of my stories to read soon,
3instead of a letter. I'm well & working so much that sometimes I
4forget I'm Olive Schreiner at all & wish anyone would tell me which of
5the characters I am. I wish you could see this blue sea & sky. Such
6joy & rest flow to me from them.
7
8 Yours
9 Olive
10
11 Hotel du Parc, Mentone
12
Notation
The 'Prelude' is in From Man to Man. Rive's (1987) version of this postcard has been misdated, omits part of the message and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 April 1900
Address FromWagenaars Kraal, Three Sisters, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Wagenaar's Kraal
2 Three Sisters
3 Mar April 5th 1900
4
5 Dear Mrs Brown,
6
7 I got a paper from Cron last week with the Padiham post mark on it, so
8I see he must have been with you on the 5th a month ago today. I hope
9he will find time to write & tell yo me how you all were: I hope you
10didn't find the English climate depressing after the dear old Riviera.
11I'm sure you'll go again. When one has once been one always "Hears the
12South a 'calling". Cron said when he saw you in London that you all
13looked so well.
14
15 I am still at Wagenaar's Kraal & shall probably stay here till Cron
16comes out unless there is any necessity for my going to the Transvaal.
17I am copying out the last of my articles; I've been delayed by being
18laid up for a week, but hope to have it done in a fortnight. Things
19seem going very badly for the Republicans now; but I know that the
20heaviest reverses the British forces have had are yet to come, though
21I am almost alone in my conviction. Of course their accusation may
22give up, & then it is all over with them for the moment; but their
23spirit I am sure of. The Republics will & must be free. It is her own
24grave that England is digging in South Africa; even if for the moment
25she succeeds. It is very lonely here, but nothing matters if one can
26be well enough to work. They are all of course extreme jingoes, & I
27have not exchanged a word with any soul here on political matters
28since I came. I keep quite quiet at table, & live altogether in my
29little room with Neta my little dog. Cron seems having a hard time,
30but I think he will do some good. This parting from him for this long
31time has been one of the hardest things I have undertaken. Be People
32here talk as if the war was over but it is really only beginning.
33Strange that people can live in a land & understand so little of its
34people & its problems.
35
36 Please write & tell me all about yourselves. I've not heard from Alice
37for a long, long, time. What is her news?
38
39 Good bye my dear, dear, friends
40 Olive
41
42

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 February 1901
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address ToCasa Eldreda, Bordighera, Italy
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The attached envelope has ‘OPENED UNDER MARTIAL LAW’ printed on it, as well as the censor’s stamp stating it was ‘passed’.
1 Hanover
2 Feb 24 / 01
3
4 Dear Mrs Brown
5
6 I hope you are feeling stronger. With the coming of the spring in
7England one always feels fresh life: the winter takes so much out of
8one.
9
10 I am still living here alone with my little dog, & the war is raging
11all about one. It seems strange to me why I should have had to come
12here & live through this terrible time of sorrow to South Africa quite
13alone so far from all my friends. But perhaps some day I shall see
14some good from it. Life is all a great mystery.
15
16 My darling husband is still in Cape Town. It's been so terrible to
17hear the cannons firing & know that is means dead men Dutch & English
18lying on the velt. Somehow I am more sorry for the soldiers than the
19Boers who die.
20
21 Did I tell you that some of they young farmers beyond Cradock are
22going to put up a little monument to my baby? You will understand how
23much I feel it. Did you get my letter thanking the dear friends in
24England for their loving thought of us?
25
26 Good bye
27 Olive
28

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.10
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1908
Address FromDe Aar
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The address it was sent from is derived from content.
1 My darling Friend
2
3 Thank you for the papers. Of course I don't want their sentence
4shortened, they are a disgrace to all South African women.
5
6 Thankyou for your dear long letter. I'd like to answer it fully. But
7the heat here is very terrible. Our little room has a flat iron roof
8with one thin layer of plank under it, & the heat is often much
9greater here than outside. Have you ever read a little story of
10Kipling called "The end of Passage." It is often in my head now as I
11lie here. Last night I went down to the camp for dinner thinking it
12would be good to see the people walking about. w^W^hen we came back we
13found the house had been burgled. They had not th broken three or four
14latches ?out of the window shutter & got in all my little boxes &
15things were lying about. They had taken my watch the only thing of any
16value I have out of it's case, & 2/- cigarettes &c &c &c but they
17seems to have been startled & gone away quickly for they left just out
18side the window a huge pick ax with which they had broken it open, &
19two heavy hammers like those you use in breaking stones. Tonight Cron
20has gone down to dinner but I am not going as I didn't like to leave
21my ms. Tonight if it getts cooler & I feel able I am going to pack
22them all into a bag & take them to the bank. I don't think the
23conditions of life here will ever be such that I can finish my book,
24but still I cling to them. They seem the one thing left that still
25relates me to life & my fellow human beings.
26
27 It is nearly 8 o'clock & the thermometer at the head of my bed still
28stands at 89.
29
30 Pl
31
32 I have made one friend here, at least found one person to whom all my
33heart goes out. She is the wife of the ^luggage^ porter at the Hotel.
34She is dying of consumption. She doesn't look as if she could live
35more than a few weeks & she has two lovely little baby girls, two &
36one year & one month month old. She has a little red house at this end
37of the camp. She is a pretty Scotch girl of about 22, but oh so thin,
38so thin. He husband is a young fellow about 25 so beautifully loving
39to her & the children. He only gets a few pounds a month at the hotel,
40but he gets food for her & himself ^from the hotel^, which saves her
41from the trouble of cooking.
42
43 Olive
44
45 ^I want much to see dear Keir Hardie, I've written to Johannesburg but
46I don't believe they'll deliver my letter as I could put no address.
47If you can let him know he must come to see us here. Oh I do long to
48see some of my own people so. I mean those who belong to me,
49
50 Good bye dear one.
51 Olive^
52
Notation
Rudyard Kipling's (1890) 'At the end of the passage' appears in Rudyard Kipling (2006) Strange Tales London: Wordsworth. The book Schreiner comments she may not finish could be 'Stray Thoughts on South Africa', From Man to Man, or else her 'sex book' which eventually became Woman and Labour.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.11
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 December 1902
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1Xmas morning
2
3 My darling Friend
4
5 How beautifully you timed your Xmas greeting. It got here to Hanover
6just a couple of hours ago on Xmas morning!
7
8 The picture is very sweet.
9
10 I hope it is good Xmas with you. Ray will have gone & you will miss,
11but it will rest your hearts to know she has found love; & perhaps
12next Xmas the two dear old birds will be moving themselves in their
13young one's nest in South Africa.
14
15 I too have had a very happy Xmas.
16
17 You know for many years such a drought & bitterness has been settling
18down on my soul. I've been able to fight for the oppressed & wronged,
19because one can always do that: but every thing has been so dead. Now
20I've got such a beautiful book that has been such a joy & help to me.
21Its called "The Soul of a People" by H. Fielding Hall. Have you read
22it. No book has even been such a comfort & joy to me. I didn't know
23books could help one so. It's a curious thing that once 12 years ago
24this man wrote to me from Burma where he was then living, & I never
25answered his letter!
I feel a great sorrow when I think of that.
26
27 I don't know why this book help me so: it makes me feel one as if it
28was spring time, & the old wide going out of the heart, not only to
29things in pain which one always feels, but to all things.
30
31 Read the book, you & my dear old Doctor together. You know I have lain
32crying three nights over the book - not with sorrow. You won't like it
33so much as I do, but you will like it.
34
35 "Gods Englishmen" are living yet, who still try to understand & love
36the things that are in their power & not crush them.
37
38 "Have I not left unto me seven thousand in Israel, all which have not
39bowed the knee to Baal."
40
41 Good bye beloved friend. A good Xmas & a peaceful New Year
42 Olive
43
Notation
The book referred to is: Harold Fielding Hall (1898) The Soul of a People London: R. Bentley & Son. The biblical quotation is from Romans 11: 4.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.12
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date10 February 1903
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The end of this letter is missing.
1 Hanover
2 Feb 10 / 03
3
4 Now I wonder, my dear friend, what you are doing just now today in
5Scotland! I am thinking of you so continually You have been so much in
6my life ever since I just saw your beautiful sweet face that day in
7Mrs Hemmings drawing room, with your bright bright blue eyes. You are
8always part of my life.
9
10 I suppose Ray is at home now. It is beautiful she should have come
11back to Africa though so far from our old Africa. Perhaps some day
12when she & her husband want a change they will come & visit the old
13Colony.
14
15 Have you read "The Soul of the People" yet? You know ever since I read
16it I sleep with it under my pillow ever night, & when my heart gets
17bad & I feel so alone then I sometimes put my hand on it, & it seems
18nearly like a living thing comforting one. No book has ever been the
19same to me. I wonder whether it will seem strange to you when you read
20the book, that I should feel so, or whether you will understand?
21
22[page/s missing]
23
Notation
The book referred to is: Harold Fielding Hall (1898) The Soul of a People London: R. Bentley & Son.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.13
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 22 February 1903
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident in Hanover from September 1900 to October 1907, after 1902 with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere.
1 Sunday morning
2 Feb 22 / 03
3
4 Dear Friend, I am thinking much of you. Have you settled for good at
520 ?Warrender Park Crescent? Have you your own rooms or is it a
6boarding house? Have you ^yet^ read The Soul of a People? You know I
7always feel as if it was my book; as if I had written it; as if it had
8come out of my heart; only, it's much more beautiful & sweet than
9anything I have written, or could write.
10
11 I wrote a little letter to the author telling him that I liked it, but
12asked him not trouble to answer me. You have to be a writer to know
13how you hate the unknown people who will write to you expecting an
14answer.
15
16 I wouldn't have written to him at all only 12 or 13 years ago he wrote
17to me, about my books I never answered his letter: but I put it away &
18kept it. It was only destroyed now at Johannesburg with my other
19things by the British. I am feeling much stronger & better lately.
20Cron is away in Cape Town; will return the end of next week. This is
21just a word of love.
22
23 Olive
24
Notation
The book referred to is: Harold Fielding Hall (1898) The Soul of a People London: R. Bentley & Son.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.14
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date14 October 1903
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn Brown and Mary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Hanover
2 Oct 14 / 03
3
4 My very dear Friends,
5
6 I wonder if you have gone abroad to Italy now. I wonder how you are I
7want so to know. Letter writing has been such an absolute
8impossibility to me, but now I have got a little Bushgirl of about 10
9(she looks much younger, but she is that though so small) & she
10fetches my water & cleans my pots, & that just makes life manageable.
11She lifts the pots on & off the fire & the buckets of water & that
12saves me so much. I begin to feel full of hope if only I can keep her.
13We are in our dear little tiny cottage, which I like so much because
14it feels like a tent on the veld, the sunshine & wind & air go right
15through it
16
17 Cron is having a hard time with business worries, but he is looking
18much better & more his old self than he has ever done since he came
19back from that awful visit to England. Please tell me a little about
20yourself. How does our Ray get on in Natal. I shall be so glad if ever
21I hear she has a little one, because it will so perfect & complete her
22life; & it will be a joy to you two dear ones too.
23
24 I shall write again soon.
25 Olive
26
27 Mrs & Dr Brown
28
29

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.15
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 1904
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been assigned to this letter based on content and previous letters mentioning John and Mary Brown's daughter Ray's possible pregnancy. Content indicates Schreiner was in Hanover when it was written. She was resident in Hanover from September 1900 to October 1907, after 1902 with visits, sometimes fairly lengthy, elsewhere.
1 Monday
2
3 Dear Mary,
4
5 I hope you are getting good news of Rays little one. Alice did not
6mention her in her last to me so I expect all was going well. Alice
7was attending my dear friend Louie Ellis who was to be operated on for
8appendicitis the day after she wrote. I am anxious for this weeks mail
9to come.
10
11 A curious thing happened this evening. I went to call on the wife of a
12Railway Engineer here who had called on me with her mother. I found
13they were the sister & mother of a girl I last saw when I was about 16;
14 she was the origin of the girl in 'The Woman's Rose." I kept the rose
15till it was destroyed with my other things in Johannesburg! It brought
16back all the past so strangely to me. She married, went to South
17America, had 7 children, & died there from taking poison, by mistake,
18they say.
19
20 I have a sweet little Persian cat, the sweetest little cat that ever
21could be. She sleeps in the top drawer of my chest of drawers. Every
22night I open it for her, & she climbs in & curls herself up & sleeps
23here, till the early dawn when she climbs out & comes to my bed.
24
25 Good night, its very late, but and I must to bed
26
27 I hope you are feeling a little stronger. I'm so glad to hear about
28the new chair, but I wish you had a donkey to pull it
29
30 Olive
31
Notation
See: "The Woman?s Rose" New Review vol 4, no.25, June 1891, pp.540-3.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.16
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date14 September 1906
Address FromThe Hotel De Aar, De Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is on hotel printed headed notepaper, with a drawing of the hotel sign.
1 Hotel "De Aar"
2
3 De Aar, Sep 14th 1906
4C.C.
5
6 Dear Friend
7
8 Thank you for your letter.
9
10 I've written to Merriman & Will about that ^urgent^ matter. No doubt I
11know many of the members who vote but I don't know who they are. Would
12it be too late to give me a list? Is the Rev Bender one?
13
14 I enclose you a letter from Emmeline Lawrence which may interest you.
15
16 I got such a letter from a woman I don't know in the Free State as has
17touched me very much. She wrote asking if she migh hope to open a
18correspondence with me as there were some things she wanted to talk
19about very much. I wrote & told her my health did not allow of my
20doing much writing now. But she wrote me yesterday a letter, which I
21got yesterday telling me so much of the sad tragedy ^story^ of her life
22with an unfaithful husband, that & the problems before her; she has
23been married 22 years & has 8 children was married herself at 19. She
24had not been married many months when she found out his secret
25infidelity. I have forgiven not once she cries but till seventy times
26seven. She cries in ?h says, & I don't know what is right or what I
27should do! Her letter has made me have anew that terrible wish, the
28only one I have uncrushed still that I could get somewhere where I
29could revise & finish my book, because just this one thing it would be,
30 that it might make such lonely struggling women as she less lonely.
31Oh it would be so beautiful to think when I was dying that I had done
32that. I should feel then I had done something with my life that it was
33not all failure & loss. It would square life to me.
34
35 I can't see my path now very clear; & in these days I am trying to
36come to some decision. While I am up in these heights ^4000 feet & 5000^
37I will never by my heart be allowed to work: I could never even have
38written that little letter on the Jews up here. At Matjesfontein my
39heart goes quite slowly & I can eat & lie down. I could pay the hotel
40charge for three months & then Cron says he would pay it for me for
41three, making six months, & I could test if in that time I got so much
42better that I could work. But there is the great difficulty that you &
43only you will be able to understand that I can't leave Cron here: here
44in this horrible dust wretchedness. I would just be longing so for him
45that work would be for that reason impossible, even appart from the
46fact that although I was better physically at Matjiesfontein I might
47yet not be able to work.
48
49 There is also a little old farm house here about 2 miles or a mile & a
50half out of De Aar. The air is clear & much cooler there Cron says he
51would buy himself a motor-car to come up & down in morning & evening.
52It will be rather far from every body & I shall have to try to get a
53servant to stay with me as it would be hardly safe to be there so far
54from every one, but I don't I near a wild camp like this, but I think
55it will end in my trying that. Of course there will be moving all the
56furniture from Hanover, & the rent for one year, so that if I fail
57there would have been as much spent besides all the work as would have
58kept me at Matjesfontein for six months. But I should be near Cron & I
59feel I must try that first. I don't mean to worry you my darling by
60telling you all this, I just want to share my plans with you. I would
61be nice at Matjesfontein to feel I was nearer to you all: But I don't
62know how I could stand being so far from Cron & knowing he was in this
63miserable place.
64
65 ^Now I must write to that friend in the Free State. I can't help her
66but I can sympathise with her. As she says "Can't our mind speak to
67each other across the wide veld."^
68
69 Olive
70
Notation
'That little letter on the Jews' is Schreiner's 'Letter on the Jew'. It was read by Cronwright-Schreiner at a Public Meeting of the Jewish Territorial Organization in Cape Town in July 1906; it was published in the Cape Times 2 July 1906 (p.8); it also appears in a shortened version as Appendix F in (ed) Cronwright-Schreiner (1924) The Letters of Olive Schreiner London: Fisher Unwin.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.17
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 October 1907
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 De Aar
2 Oct 15 / 07
3
4 My darling Friend
5
6 Thank you for your letter. I am glad of its news.
7
8 Its my favourite old spot up there by the block house that I used to
9walk up to three or four times every week in the old days ten or
10twelve years ago.
11
12 I am sitting alone in my little fore-trekker room with Ollie. The wind
13& dust are howling about. It is very hot, & about 1 o'clock, I am not
14going down to the Camp for dinner, as Cron is away at Beaufort West
15seeing about his election; & it's not worth while walking that mile in
16the dust & heat if I don't see him at the end. I am making such pretty
17little muslin curtains for the windows & the ?brakets, & am going to
18have it so nice & clean when Cron comes back. I am in some ways nearly
19as lonely here as in Hanover, but I love so to see the commercial
20travellers & Jews eating their food at the hotel, & it's such joy to
21see the train coming in across the plain & hear its whistle, & to know
22it comes from the great world of things & men & goes to it It quite
23keeps away that awful shut off feeling one had in Hanover. Did you
24read that really disgraceful letter of Mrs Roos's in Ons Land. When
25one thinks of all that Jews & Catholics & Freethinkers did for the
26Boers during the war, dear old Sir William Butler ^who is a Catholic^ &
27Dr Kolbe, & the brave little Jews who died fighting with them & for
28them at Mafeking & else where. When one thinks of the way the
29freethinking English working men stood by them, when all the good
30earnest Christian brothers were hounding their attackers on, this out
31break of ignorance
32
33^& bigotry is truly terrible. The attitude of many Boers since the war
34is more painful to think of than the attitude of many English during
35the war. At present one political party is exactly like the other. We
36shall see when the new parliament meets according to what principles
37men will group themselves.
38
39 I'm so sorry dear Elsie has still that painful case. I think it must
40be really getting too much for her.
41
42 Love to you all
43 Olive^
44
Notation
Mrs Roos's letter in Ons Land cannot be traced.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.18
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 October 1910
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToJulie Brown
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident in De Aar from November 1907 until she left South Africa for Britain and Europe in December 1913, but with some fairly lengthy visits elsewhere over this time.
1 Oct 31 /10
2
3 Dear Julie
4
5 I have been out today to see a poor man who is very lit ill with liver
6& heart. He was tapped in Cape Town a few weeks ago, but is no better
7since his return. the He has to sit up day & night the swelling in the
8stomach & legs is so unreadable bad. They want to get an experienced
9man who understands scientific massage to rub him & help to take care
10of him Do you perhaps know of such an one; if so could you let me know
11what he would charge by the month for coming. If you don't know of a
12man do you know of a good ordinary nurse not for massage, but who
13would come up simple to nurse for the month - but she must not be a
14very grand woman who would need too much waiting on. The Van Zyls are
15the richest farmers in this district, the house is beautifully clean,
16though small. But the poor woman (who is well educated) has two tiny
17babys & things could not be as nice as in Town: If you know of such a
18nurse he please write & say what her charge would be. They all
19understand English. The farm is an hour & a half from De Aar. They
20come in nearly every day for letters &cc.
21
22 I am writing to Mrs ?Calingem too to know if she knows of a man who
23can pa give massage, I think they will have to be content with a good
24woman nurse. They don't like simply to write to Kimberley or Cape Town
25for a nurse, because they may get one those terrible nurses who need
26so much attention & waiting on that she takes more time than she saves
27- you know the kind The great difficulty is the bedroom. They have
28only two. He has to have one, ^& his wife sits up with him^ & in the
29other the two babies & the old mother (who has come while he's so ill)
30sleep. But if the nurse took the night nursing she might stipulate to
31have the bedroom to herself during the day, & at night
32
33^she could have a bed put on a verandah which opens into a pretty^
34
35^rose garden. In this climate, I sleep half the night outside, sitting^
36
37^up to get breathe! Its better than inside.^
38
39 Olive
40

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.19
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date4 June 1920
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToJohn Brown
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
1 June 4th 1920
2 London
3
4 Dear J.B.
5
6 How goes the world with you? I've not seen Ray again. Alice Corthorn
7tells me she's in the country. I saw Alice three days ago. I shall be
8glad when she drops her work: she's very unwell. She longs so to be
9out of London. I am sailing on the 13th of August for South Africa. I
10don't know if its wise for me to go, I have such a curious foreboding
11feeling but I can't face another winter here alone in this room in the
12fog & dark, I can't: & I'm too ill to go knocking about in Italy alone.
13 The attacks of angina come on so continually & then I can do nothing
14for myself. Here I just sit in my room & go out once a day to buy my
15little bits of food.
16
17 Its very hot here now - for England - but am standing the heat very
18well; its much better than the fog, & rain. We've had four days
19without any rain now, which is wonderful. Such a thing has not
20happened. It will be good to see you & Mary again. You & she & my
21dear old friend John Pursglove are all that are left of the friends of
22my early youth.
23
24 Good bye my dear love to you both
25 Olive
26
27 Have you seen Ruth Alexander since she came back? She's promised to
28try & find quarters for me. I shall go to Ursula & Fan for the first
29few days; but I'm too unfit to trouble any of my friends for long with
30my presence. A person who's always getting angina is so depressing!! I
31would like to get two little rooms somewhere - but its hard to find
32rooms at the Cape Well what happens will happen
33

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.23
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1 December 1908 ; Before End: 27 December 1908
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This part of a letter was found between the pages of Mary Brown's copy of Schreiner's Closer Union. There is a page missing after 'down to Cape' and before 'I send you in the way you asked. Schreiner arrived in Matjesfontein on 27 December 1908 but was firmly ensconced in De Aar in late November 1908, and thus its approximate dating.
1 Private
2
3 I'm writing a thing on closer Union. If no one else will speak out for
4the natives I must. When done it will be published in a Transvaal
5paper. I seem to be writing it with blood not ink, it's so hard to
6write here feeling as one does in these heights one's pulse 105, & I
7don't know if it'll be any good when its done.
8
9 Don't mention this to any one. I don't want it talked of till it comes
10out.
11
12 I'm perhaps going to Matjesfontein when I've finished it, & perhaps
13down to Cape
14
15[page/s missing]
16
17 I send you in the way you asked.
18
19 I do hope they'll choose you as President. I'm going to write to Anna
20Purcell
^&c^ about it.
21
22
23
Notation
Schreiner's Closer Union originated as a lengthy article published in the Transvaal Leader on 21 December 1908 and the Cape Times on 22 December 1908 (p.9); it appeared as a short book in 1909.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.24
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Datend
Address Fromna
Address To
Who Tounknown
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This is the only remaining fragment of a letter, with '...a nephew...' on one side of a piece of paper and the rest of the text on the other.
1 ... a nephew of Judge ?Markanin who is a great friend of Sir James
2Innes
& of Merriman.
3
4 Africa ?would
5 them much
6 Yours ever
7 Olive Schreiner
8
9
10

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.26A
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date28 April 1887
Address FromAlassio, Italy
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front. Schreiner stayed in Alassio from late October 1887 to February 1888 and from early April to May 1888.
1 I'm leaving this for my beloved Switzerland land again on Monday. My
2address will be
3
4 Hotel Post
5 Aen Steg
6 Switzerland
7
8 Aen Steg is a tiny village buried away among the mountains. I don't
9think I shall ever return to England, but if I ever do the moors are
10the first thing I shall go & see. One wouldn't think how I loved you
11long letter from my not writing. I can't write even letters anymore to
12anyone. I'll send you a little box of flowers as soon as I get back.
13You must have something that comes from my Aen Steg.
14
15 Your stupid
16 Olive
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.26B
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date25 March 1889
Address FromParis, France
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front.
1 I am in Paris. I hoped to be able to finish my nursing course here,
2but I find my ^want of good^ knowledge of French will stand in my way, &
3I shall perhaps have to return to Endle St. In that case I shall go
4over to England next week as the term begins in April. I always
5associate nursing & hospitals with you. I went to see the Morgue
6to-day I will tell you about it sometime & the beautiful thought that
7took away
8
9^the sadness from me.^
10
11Olive
12
13 ^Address to my brother's care^
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.26C
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date26 July 1889
Address FromLadies Chambers, Chenies Street, Camden, London
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front. Schreiner was resident in Chenies Street from early June to late August 1889.
1 Bret Harte is Bret Harte. Letter is lovely.
2
3 Do you know any one who would care to send boys to Ed Carpenter's
4school.
5
6 ^Muirhead, the second master is one is the noblest & sweet natures I
7ever came into contact with.^
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: John & Mary Brown MSC 26/2.2.26E
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date15 March 1891
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To66 Bank Parade, Burnley, Lancashire
Who ToMary Brown nee Solomon
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front. The place it was sent from is provided by content.
1 I know if you treated me rightly you would never write to me. But I
2long so for one of your beautiful letters. I am well I am making some
3close women friends here, & like Africa more & more. I am still
4leading the quiet life at Matjesfontein. I think of you always.
5
6 Olive
7

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: J.T. Lloyd MSC 26/2.5.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 October 1892
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToJohn T. Lloyd
Other VersionsRive 1987: 212-15
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The end of this letter is missing, with the bottom of the last sheet of paper having been cut off.
1 Matjesfontein
2 Oct 29 / 92
3
4 Dear Mr Lloyd
5
6 Thank you very much for the lecture you sent me. Need I tell you that
7I valued it.
8
9 Thank you a great deal for the letter you gave me in Kimberley. I can
10only feel there is so much I should have to learn from you if I knew
11you personally. I can only tell you that any ^minute^ insight I have
12gained, has been gained at the price of more mistakes than you could
13easily understand.
14
15 I need not tell you that I have read your letter more than once with
16deep interest. I wish we could have had a long talk together at
17Kimberley, because I feel writing on such a subject to be very
18unsatisfactory. So many things have come into my mind while I was
19reading your letter that I wished to say to you. I am coming to visit
20my little mother before I leave South Africa, probably in January, &
21if I can go down for a day to Port Elizabeth, I shall do so, to have
22the pleasure of meeting you. Then we can talk as I would like over the
23many points of deep interest in your letter.
24
25 When I think over your position as shown in your letter, & mine, the
26chief difference between you^r view & mine^ seems to be, that for you
27the universe is not so Unified as it is for me.
28
29 I have never been able to conceive of God, & man & the material
30universe as distinct from one another. The laws of my mind do not
31allow of it. I hope unreadable at the ?assumption through reason have unreadable
32When I was a little child of five & sat alone among the tall weeds at
33the back of our house, this ?perpec perception of the unity of all
34things, & that they were alive, & that I was part of them, was as
35clear & over powering to me as it is today. It is the one thing I am
36never able to doubt.
37
38 The agony of my childhood, especially from the time I was 9 till I was
39fourteen, was the impossibility of reconciling this ^direct^ perception
40from which I could never shake myself free, with what I was taught.
41When at fourteen or fifteen I began to study physical science, this
42agonizing disorganization ended for me. I was like a child walking
43about with one half of a puzzle in its hand, into which nothing
44willnot fit: then I found the other half; and it fitted. Since then
45religion has been to me the one unending joy.
46
47 If you ask me what is my religion, it is hard for me to answer,
48because we humanbeings have not framed speech for the purpose of
49expressing such thoughts - but if I must put it into words I would say
50the Universe is one, & it lives: - or if you would put it into older
51phraseology, I would say; - there is nothing but God.
52
53 You may say that this is no answer to all the questions you asked me,
54but, dear friend, it is the answer, & the only one I can give.
55
56 You ask me, do I believe in immortality? I cannot conceive of either
57birth or death, as anything but simple changes in the endless
58existence: how can I then either believe in or disbelieve in
59immortality in the ordinary sense? There is nothing but God! If you
60ask me what is the practical effect of this feeling, it is to make all
61life very precious to me, but also to rob death of all its horrors.
62
63 There is something beautiful & sacred to me in assisting at the birth
64of a little baby in studying the facts of embryology, in watching a
65little plant seed germinate; there is also something to me wonderful &
66sacred in death, but it is hardly more overpowering & wonderful to me
67than birth. I could as little fear to be alone with a dying person; or
68to sleep in a room with a dead body as I should be afraid to sleep
69under the footstool of a personal God. Neither birth nor death are
70final to me. You see, dear friend, how difficult it is for me to speak
71of these things from the standpoint of another. My feeling with regard
72to these things is not a theory; I believe scientific knowledge
73harmonized with my feeling, but I could not shake myself free from it
74if they did not; there would only be dis-cord, as there was of old
75between facts as known to my intellect, & my inevitable perceptions. I
76think I first had this feeling with regard to death clearly when my
77favourite little sister died when I was nine years old. I slept with
78her little body until it was buried, & after that I used to sit for
79hours by her grave It & it was as impossible for me then, as it is
80impossible for me now, to accept the ordinary doctrine that she was
81living on somewhere without a body. I felt then & I have always felt
82since when I have been brought face to face with the death of that it
83is in a larger doctrine than that, that joy & beauty must be sought.
84
85 I used to love the birds & animals & inanimate nature better after she
86was dead; the whole of existence seemed to me more beautiful because
87it had brought forth & taken back to itself such a beautiful thing as
88she was to me. Can you understand the feeling?
89
90 You see, how can I believe in or care to think about miracles to whom
91all life is a miracle? How can I believe in the incarnation of any one
92man as God? It is unthinkable.
93
94 About my feeling with regard to Jesus it is not strong in any way. But
95I deeply understand your feeling. The only man to whose moral teaching
96I am conscious of owing a profound & unending debt is John Stuart Mill;
97 when I got home to Europe & found men & women whose views exactly
98coincided with indifference to his works or ridiculing them as
99old-fashioned, it was keenly painful to me; because they had been the
100channels through which most of the spirit of current modem science
101reached me.
102
103 Personally I owe nothing to the teaching of Jesus: except the 5th &
1046th chapters of Matthew. No part of his teaching morally ever touched
105me, as a child, & from the time I was fourteen when I ceased to read
106the bible or go to church, Christianity has been almost non-existent
107for me; I have lived to an extent you would hardly understand, in
108another world; & the name so dear to you brings back to me nothing but
109sad & depressing memories. But as a great, rare soul, whom doubtless
110we should love better if a fuller record had been left of him, by his
111followers, I always wish some record had been left of them his life
112between 20 & 30; those years the most important & intense in which
113amid agony & temptation his view of life was forming. I think among
114great religious teachers he does not quite draw me as Buddha & others,
115because done his teaching stops short with the human world; it is to
116me doubtful whether he ever caught sight of that larger unity; whether
117he ever realized the divinity in plant & animal, as well as man. I
118cannot quite understand how the sense of unity shall extend to the
119most miserable, drunken little Bushman with his sloping forehead &
120protruding jaw who limps past my house, & stop when I stand at the Zoo
121& see Sally looking at me from behind her bars with her great,
122passionate, fierce, reflective eyes! - my little sister growing on
123slowly to be me! I cannot understand that scorn of men towards
124"matter". The stars are wonderful, the light, in a human eye is
125wonderful, the growing of a seed is wonderful; but is there anything
126more wonderful than the power which keeps together the particles,
127which in fact constitutes them? There is only one name which I can
128give it, it is the same name I give to that I find working & moving in
129my own little personality.
130
131 You see, my dear friend, how absolutely close we are, & yet I cannot
132stop in the thought of "God" as the father of man; & men as brothers;
133I have to go further. Nothing tortured me so in Christian teaching as
134the scorn for the animal world, & the hatred of matter. But if we knew
135really what the beautiful soul of Jesus thought & felt, we should find
136it loved wider & deeper than its followers left us any record of.
137
138 This is a poor answer to send you to your beautiful letter. But except
139in my own language of parables, I cannot express myself. If I say that
140in a stone in the road, in the thoughts in my brain, in the corpuscles
141in a drop of blood under my microscope, in a railway engine rushing
142past me in the velt, I see God, shall I not only be darkening counsel
143with words? If I say that when I nurse a man with smallpox I am
144touching something far other than what simply seems to be lying there;
145if I say that when I go to the prison to see a prisoner I simply go to
146see myself; if I say that when I go out among the rocks alone, I am
147not alone, I hav have I made anything clearer? Words are very poor
148things. It almost pains write as I have been this afternoon, because
149what one wants to say one cannot.
150
151 It will be great pleasure to me if ever we can meet before I go to
152England.
153
154 Thank you much for the book of poems. If I do not post this letter now
155I shall tear it up, so I will not keep it to add what I think of them,
156but shall write again.
157
158[page/s missing]
159
160
161
Notation
The book of poems sent by Lloyd cannot be established. Rivess (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: J.T. Lloyd MSC 26/2.5.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: 1892 ; Before End: 1899
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToJohn T. Lloyd
Other VersionsRive 1987: 259-60
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter has been approximately dated by reference to the period over which Schreiner and Lloyd were in communication. The beginning and end of the letter are missing. The first paragraph starting ‘One point he & I...’, the second paragraph starting ‘Then if such an awful...’, and the final paragraph starting ‘mistake, & nobly refused to marry...’, are not in Schreiner’s hand-writing but copied out by Lloyd as part of a set of notes he sent to Cronwright-Schreiner. The paragraphs starting ‘All these social matters…’ until ‘…make right her terrible’ are in Schreiner’s own hand.
1 [page/s missing]
2
3One point he & I are always having great arguments about: he, like
4Grant Allen & others, thinks it a matter all-important that there
5should be no legal ceremony connected with marriage, I consider it a
6mere bagatelle. If the world requires a legal ceremony go through it,
7just as you walk on the pavement instead of in the middle of the
8street, if your fellow men demand it. What does matter is that both
9persons should be sure that they love each other with a deathless love
10which no other human being shall be able to undo, & that the woman be
11absolutely & entirely monetarily independent of the man. That is the
12great thing; let love bind you, not a common account in the bank. I
13believe the whole secret of happy & healthy & deathless unions is that
14marriages should be formed entirely independent of monetary
15considerations.
16
17 Then if such an awful thing should happen as that a man or woman
18should find they had made a mistake, there would be no difficulty in
19their separating forever, as they ought, the moment they feel they do
20not love each other, or love anyone else better.
21
22 All these social matters are very complex, therefore it is difficult
23to give advice; & so wrong to believe that what is the right path for
24you must be the right path for other people.
25
26 One thing I always find it difficult to understand is how people
27gather from any of my writings that I think lightly of marriage. I
28think it to be the most holy, the most organic, the most important
29sacrament in life, & how men & women can enter into with the
30lighthearted indifference they do, has n always been, & is, a matter
31of endless wonder to me.
32
33 Because poor little Lyndall who died when she was a child of seventeen,
34 found out she had made a mistake in her relation to with that man, &
35saved herself from turning it into a life-long fornication, &
36prostitution - therefore people seem to suppose I am opposed to
37life-long & deathless marriage between the man & woman!!
38
39 Because that poor little child of seventeen tried make right her
40terrible
41
42mistake, & nobly refused to marry a man she did not absolutely love, I
43have had women of six & twenty write to me as if I could feel it right
44they should form temporary unions!!! It was because Lyndall, small
45child though she was, felt what a sacred & deathless thing true
46marriage should be that she refused to save her reputation by binding
47herself for ever to that man.
48
49[page/s missing]
50
51
Notation
Lloyd’s covering letter to Cronwright-Schreiner is as follows:

82A Portsdown Road, London, W.9, May 28 1921
From J.T. Lloyd

My introduction to Olive Schreiner occurred during the Kimberley exhibition in the year 1892, & soon thereafter we became very close friends. I had been invited to deliver a lecture at the Exhibition on “Literary Life in South Africa”, in which, of course, the chief figure was Olive Schreiner. A verbatim report of the lecture appeared in the Diamond Fields Advertiser, a copy of which I forwarded to her. At that time I was experiencing great intellectual difficulties which ?rendered my work as a clergyman. In a letter handed to her I fully described those difficulties & asked for her assistance in dealing with them. That explains the following great & important epistle.

That was the first of over a thousand letters I was privileged to receive from her. Her fame as a great genius was then fully established, but many South Africans condemned in no measured terms her sceptical views on religion. Of course, there were a few who realized & publically acknowledged her greatness, but the majority deliberately misrepresented her teaching. This was specially the case in regard to Lyndall’s refusal to marry a man she did not love, as related in the African Farm. The false inference was drawn that the authoress was an opponent of marriage. In a letter to me she confessed that she agreed on the whole with the views expressed by Edward Carpenter in his little pamphlet on the subject. She said: -

Next to the final paragraph Lloyd has written: ‘That ought to dispose of the wholly groundless notion that Olive Schreiner did not believe in marriage.’

Rive’s (1987) version of Schreiner's letter is in a number of respects incorrect.


Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Miscellaneous: Harry Gie MSB 834/1.3.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday 6 January 1897
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToHarry Gie
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. Two dates have been written on this letter by an unknown hand, 3 May 1893 and 6 January 1897 (both of which were Wednesdays). Content with regard to the 'we' going to the steamer favours the 1897 date.
1 Wednesday morning
2
3 Dear Harry Gie,
4
5 You will think I & my dog are the greatest bores you ever knew.
6
7 But would you give the Cabman ^of Cab 15^ the enclosed 3/- to buy food
8for my dog, if they have him. Do like a good old Marx try to find some
9one to have him for me. I'll write a book about your kindness to me if
10you will. I want so to know the dog is with some one who will be kind
11to him.
12
13 Good bye we are just off to the steamer
14
15 Yours ever
16 Olive Schreiner
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Miscellaneous: Harry Gie MSB 834/1.3.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 July 1907
Address FromRossyvera, Norfolk Road, Sea Point, Cape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToHarry Gie
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Rosyvera
2 Norfolk Rd
3 Sea Point
4 July 20th 1907
5
6 My dear Harry
7
8 I am just really glad to hear your good news. And your dear old Mother
9is I know rejoicing. Her great wish was to see you married. I should
10like so much to see your friend. I am going to try & find out if she
11comes to town. Please send her my address if she should come down here
12in September before I leave.
13
14 Is she related to Willie Louw who died at Colesberg?
15
16 Are you fixed in Petrusville or only there for a time?
17
18 It was so good of you not to forget your old friend, in your time of
19great happiness. One thing your future bride may be sure of, that she
20is going to have a good & unselfish husband.
21
22 My husband sends his kind regards & says I must give you many good
23wishes for the future.
24
25 Good bye dear old "Marks"
26
27 Your affecate friend
28 Olive Schreiner
29
30

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Miscellaneous: Harry Gie MSB 834/1.3.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date24 July 1907
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address ToPetrusville, Northern Cape
Who ToHarry Gie
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this letter is derived from the postmark on an attached envelope, which also provides the address the letter was sent to.
1 Matjesfontein
4
5From
6O.S.
7
8To
9 H.G.
11
12 Thanks. Hope flourishing. Arrive 30th Pools Hotel evening, 9. o'clock.
13If small figure is seen rushing down the street with head bent down,
14hail it, It will probably be me.
15____________
16
17 NB.
18 This is the new Telegraphic form of letter writing.
19
20
21

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateTuesday 20 April 1912
Address FromAlexandra Hotel, Muizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Alexandra Hotel
2 Muizenberg
3 Tuesd
4
5 Dear Mr Kallenbach
6
7 Thank you much for your letter I hope if ever you or Mr Gandi pass de
8Aar when I am ay home I shall have the great pleasure to seeing you at
9my house.
10
11 It was indeed a great pleasure to me to meet you
12
13 I am still staying on here but do not know how long I shall stay.
14Thanks very much for saying you will send some books, but please don't
15send them here, send them to de Aar Addressed not to me, but to my
16husband as they will be sent on if addressed to me, with my letters. I
17have no time for reading here, & at de Aar I have a great deal of time,
18 & no books as there is no library there.
19
20 I should like much to come & see you all at Tolstoy farm but I fear
21its too high up for me. I will write & tell my friend Miss Molteno
22that you will be glad to see her Please remember me most warmly to Mr
23Gandi
. I hope we shall meet again
24
25 Yours very sincerely
26 Olive Schreiner
27

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSaturday 15 August 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToMohandas Gandhi
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 Telephone
23350
33300Western

4
5 30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace
6 Kensington
7 London W.
8 Saturday
9
10 My dear Mr Ghandi,
11
12 I have at last got your address from the Steamship's Company. I want
13so much to see you. Could you & Mr Calenbach perhaps come & see me
14here, or could I meet you anywhere.
15
16I was struck to the heart this morning with sorrow to see that you, &
17that beautiful & beloved Indian poetess whom I met in London some
18months ago & other Indian friends had offered to serve this the
19English Government in this evil war in any way they might demand of
20you. Surely you, who would not take up arms even in the cause of your
21own oppressed people cannot be willing to shed blood in this wicked
22cause. I had longed to meet you & Mr Calenbach as friends who would
23understand my hatred of y it. I don't believe the statement in the
24paper can be true.
25
26 Yours very sincerely,
27 Olive Schreiner
28
29

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateWednesday September 1914
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand.
1 30 St Mary Abbott's Terrace
2 Kensington
3 Wednesday
4
5 Dear Mr Callenbach
6
7 Ive not written to you because I've been too tired & unwell to do
8anything in the way of going out that was not absolutely necessary. I
9am going out now to look at a little flat on the Chelsea Embankment, &
10hope I may be able to move there at once, when I will write & ask you
11to come & we can go up the river which is just before my door.
12
13 I disliked Miss Pankhurst's speech very much, it was all "lime-light"
14& theatrical.
15
16 Please be sure & tell me when you come how much I owe you.
17
18 On my way back from Chelsea I am going to that vegetarian place in
19Tottenham court road to see their food.
20
21 I feel so interested in that young Jew. His pictures show real talent.
22I shall try to get some of my friends to buy some.
23
24 ^Kind regards to Mr & Mrs Gandhi
25
26 Yours sincerely
27 Olive Schreiner^
28
29

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 October 1914
Address FromBay View, West Parade, Hythe, Kent
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Bay View
2 West Parade
3 Hythe
4 Kent
5 Oct 2nd 1914
6
7 Dear Mr Kallenbach
8
9 Thank you for your letter I wrote two letters to you, but I now see I
10addressed them wrongly to 16 not 60 therefore you did not answer or
11come to see me. I am staying down here now ^quite alone^. I have taken
12two little rooms facing the sea. I find it very damp & trying but
13could not get suitable rooms in London, & am still hoping that my
14little 14/- a week flat will be free someday when I shall return to
15London at once.
16
17 Thank Mr Ghandi for the invitation to the meeting, but you know I hate
18war. It is against my religion - whether it is Englishmen travelling
19thousands of miles to go & kill Indians ^in India^ or Indians travelling
20thousands of miles to kill white men whom they have never seen in
21Europe. It's all hateful.
22
23 I hope Mr Ghandi and Mrs Ghandi will not find this northern climate
24too trying. We who come from the south & were born there can't stand
25this damp & mist. I hope you are keeping fit yourself.
26
27 Good bye.
28
29 Yours very sincerely
30 & hoping to see you when I return to London if you are still there.
31
32 Olive Schreiner
33
34 My friend Pethick Lawrence said he was coming to see Mr Ghandi.
35Remember me very kindly to both Mr & Mrs Ghandi.
36
37

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 October 1914
Address FromDurrants Hotel, Manchester Square, Westminster, London
Address To16 Fulbert Road, Charring Cross, London
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date and the address this letter was sent to have been written on in an unknown hand. The letter is on embossed headed notepaper which has been crossed through.
1The Windsor,
2Lancaster Gate,
3London
4
5 Dear Mr Callenbach
6
7 Thank you for your kind note I am coming to see you some afternoon
8Which time is most convenient? I should like to see the Ghandis too.
9
10 My address till I can get into my own little flat will be Durrant's
11Hotel, Manchester Square, W.
12
13 A Yours ever
14 Olive Schreiner
15

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateOctober 1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I am so sorry I did not know Mr Gandhi was ill. I am coming to see you
7all perhaps attomorrow. Saturday if I find I cannot come today. I only
8stayed two days at Durrant's Hotel & have written to you twice since I
9was here but you seem not to get the letters.
10
11 Yours ever
12 Olive Schreiner
13

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter DateWednesday 1914
Address Fromna
Address To60 Talbot Road, Bayswater, London
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The postmark on this postcard is almost illegible, although it appears in the 1914 archive sequence and thus its dating here.
1 I should like to come & see you all tomorrow Could you call for me
2here at 5 o'clock. Telephone if it is not convenient.
3
4 Olive Schreiner
5 Wednesday afternoon
6

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: October 1914 ; Before End: July 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915; the letter appears in the 1914 archive sequence.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I wonder if you got my note yesterday the other day saying I was
7coming to see you all
8
9 I did come yesterday afternoon as a friend offered to drive me in her
10motor car. The boy told me you were all in, but when I had waited for
11some time he said you were out. I went out & walked up & down for
12three-quarters of an hour & came back but you'd not come in so I came
13home I'll come again some other afternoon Are you generally out about
14three o'clock. Or might I find you all in at that time I hope Mr
15Ghandi
is better.
16
17 I hope There is more bloodshed in South Africa! Some people are never
18happy if they are not killing other people
19
20 Yours very sincerely
21 Olive Schreiner
22

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.9
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 1914
Address Fromna
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The final insertion is on a separate small piece of paper.
1 Monday
2
3 Dear Mr Kallenbach
4
5 I was sorry you did not come to Miss Hobhouse's yesterday. I was glad
6to see Mr Gandhi looking much better. Would you please buy me 2/- of
7monkey nuts - roasted, if you can get them & 1/- of red juicy apples -
8if you can get them.
9
10 I have had too much to do to be able to go out but some day we must go
11up the river. I long for the fresh air
12
13 Could you ask Mr Gandhi if he could get me the address of that
14Mahamedan Judge I was speaking of: he lives near London. I want to
15write to him & find if he can give me any news if the English officer
16who was my great friend & I believe his - his name is Something - Alli,
17 I cant remember what
18
19 Yours sincerely
20 Olive Schreiner
21
22 ^Shearn's
23 Vegetarian Depot
24 Tottenham Court Rd^
25
26 This is the place where my friend gets her nuts but I think its very
27dear
28
29 OS
30

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.10
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year is provided by the content of the letter and its place in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Dear Mr Kallenbach
2
3 I am still in bed. I'm too tired to go this morning as I did not sleep
4at all last night I have still heaps of monkey nuts Tell me how much
5you've paid for all - a proper statement & I'll pay you
6
7 Yours ever
8 O Schreiner
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.11
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 The Would you do me a great favour I left an old cloak of mine in a
7taxi it's at Scotland Yard near Westminster bridge. I bought the cloak
8before the Boer War 15 years ago for 10/6 & its been twice died to
9clean it. So its worth about 2/- now but I've had it so long I love it
10& I've no other wrap. I enclose 1/- in stamps Would you kindly get it
11for me showing this letter that they may know I've sent you. Its an
12old green cloak with two buttons in front.
13
14 It will be such a favour if you can get it for me.
15
16 Yours ever
17 Olive Schreiner
18
19 ^I enclose 1/3 in stamps for the cloak^
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.12
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I wanted to be up & ask you to go to Hampstead with me this morning,
7to see a dear friend of mine who I know you would love & to look at
8some rooms she has found for you, but this fog is making my chest so
9bad I can't.
10
11 If you would get me another book for this I would be so glad. Could
12you come tomorrow at all? But don't come if you have any
13
14^thing else to do.
15
16 With thanks
17 Olive Schreiner^
18
19 ^Are you still at 16 the at the same address?^
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.13
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateDecember 1914
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I am so very sorry you can't get to India to your friends. I know how
7lonely you must be. We can only hope the war will soon be over.
8
9 Don't forget when you return the book to let me pay you the 4/- or
10what ever it was it cost. You ought to have let me pay you for my
11ticket. When we go again you must.
12
13 Yours ever with much more deep sympathy than I express
14
15 OS
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.14
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Monday October 1914 ; Before End: July 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is on printed headed notepaper. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3 Monday night
4
5 Dear Mr Kallenbach
6
7 I am enclosing one of those slips; I can give you as many as you like.
8
9 Please let me know how much the ticket cost, & the motor. I must at
10least pay half of the latter.
11
12 I am expecting you at 4 30 tomorrow
13
14 Yours ever
15 Olive Schreiner
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.15
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateJanuary 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHerman Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Thank you, I am much much better since I got back.
2
3 My little niece from Africa gave me this letter for you from Ruth
4Alexander
Tell me when next we meet if theres interesting news in it.
5I'm not up yet.
6
7 On Tuesday you had better meet me, if we don't meet before, at
8?Appenrodes opposite Scot's at a quarter to two.
9
10 Thanks
11 OS
12

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.16
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday February 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3 Sunday
4
5 Have you engagements for tomorrow? Or could you call here before 11
6tomorrow morning warmly dressed & take me for a drive on the top of
7the omnibus to Richmond? I feel too weak to go alone, & I shall not
8get strong till I get fresh air. I am posting this on Sunday so you
9ought to get it by the 8 o'clock post on Monday Please give me the
10account for the things you've got tell me how much it all comes to.
11
12 Yours ever
13 Olive Schreiner
14
15 I know how much you will have felt dear Mr Gokale's death. Why do the
16good & wonderful pass so soon.
17

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.17
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: February 1915 ; Before End: March 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Dear Mr Kallenbach
2
3 Thank you so much I've no one to get things for me. I feel more ill
4than I've ever felt since I left Africa but perhaps I shall be better
5tomorrow They have sent by mistake Roses lime juice but Roses lime
6juice cordial I can't drink this do you think they would change it for
7the ^lime juice^ cordial.
8
9 No I only want the Fortnightly for Feb. & if it can't be got Jan - but
10don't trouble about it. Yes please tell the porter to send the milk up
11to me. It is so very very kind of you to do all this for me.
12
13 OS
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.18
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMonday 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Monday
2
3Dear Mr Kallenbach
4
5 Thank you for your note I'm glad all goes so well with you. I am going
6away for some days to the country this week, but will let you know
7when I return next week. No I wouldn't like to live in that part. I
8like to be either right in the country or in the heart of London. I
9shall perhaps go later to live near some friends in Scotland. I hope
10you have good news of Mr Ghandi.
11
12 Yours with best wishes
13 Olive Schreiner
14

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.19
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Dear Mr Kallenbach
2
3 If you could come this evening about 8, I should like to get up & sit
4in the drawing & have a talk for a little time. Thanks so much, I want
5nothing more except the account
6
7 OS
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.20
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Dear Mr Kallenbach
2
3 I am not well enough to get up this morning I may try this afternoon
4Would you get me, if you have time half a pound of plain mixed cheese
5biscuits (Huntley & Palmers) if they have them.
6
7 I shall try to get up & go & sit in the drawing room this evening, but
8am not sure if I can. Will you post these ?th two packets & letters
9for me.
10
11 Olive Schreiner
12
13 They did not send my milk yesterday or today. I only want 1 pint not
14one quart.
15
16 There is a good deal of news in the papers this morning??
17
18 Yours ?sincerely
19
20 Could you address this letter to Mr Ward, Committee of Democratic
21Control
I have forgotten the address.
22
23 Could you order me 6 syphons of soda water at the Chemist near here on
24this side of the street as you go towards Barkers Harrington, & tell
25him to send for the 6 syphons I have here. 6 cost 1/3 always Could
26?you buy me the Daily News & the Morning Post for today. I have
27nothing to read.
28

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.21
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 I am not taking anything but milk thankyou since Tuesday I think I
2have pneumonia in the left lung as well as my heart there is nothing
3more I need tonight, thank you.
4
5 Its too good of you to take so much trouble for me.
6
7 Yours,
8 OS
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.22
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 If I am not better tomorrow I shall have to send for a nurse. Could
2you buy me about 6d worth of bananas. But don't trouble tonight
3tomorrow will do
4
5 OS
6

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.23
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Thank you very much indeed. No there's nothing I need. I've gone to
5bed as I'm rather tired.
6
7 I hope so
8
9 Don't hurry about the cloak any time will do.
10
11 Yours with thanks
12 Olive Schreiner
13

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.24
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The year of this letter is provided by content and its position in the archive sequence. Schreiner was resident at Kensington Palace Mansions from October 1914 to July 1915.
1 Dear Mr K
2
3 Many thanks I don't need any thing Enclose cheque for £1-0-0 toward
4pay for the things you got me. I am getting better & will write some
5Cape letters
6
7 Yours with many thanks
8 Olive Schreiner
9

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.25
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date16 March 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I hope you will understand my having spoken to you about Mr Rosenberg.
7I always feel if you have a friend it is much better for you to tell
8them if their action pains you, that to think of it & say nothing.
9
10 I am sure that you didn't realize how to so talk so of another
11gentleman in a visiting a lady would make her feel. It was because I
12had always thought your nature to be so different that I felt it as
13keenly as I did. What we eat & drink, & wear seems to matter so little
14to me compared with what we say & feel about our fellows. I'll never
15refer to the matter again to you.
16
17 I am sending you a copy of woman peace programme I have gone on the
18committee of the English branch
19
20 Do you know any women who would care to join it.
21
22 Yours ever
23 Olive Schreiner
24
Notation
Schreiner's rebuke to Kallenbach concerns the poet and artist Isaac Rosenberg (see Jean Moorcroft Wilson (2007) Isaac Rosenberg: The Making of a Great War Poet London: Weidenfield & Nicholson), who had met and stayed with Betty Molteno and Alice Greene for part of the time he was in South Africa between June 1914 and February 1915. From a poor East End background and known for his reticence and marked accent, on such occasions as his visit to Schreiner with a letter of introduction from Molteno, Rosenberg would have worn an ill-fitting 'family suit'. Rosenberg wrote to Betty Molteno concerning his visit that Schreiner was an 'extraordinary woman... full of life' (Isaac Rosenberg to Betty Molteno, March 1915, Molteno Murray Collection, UCT), but did not mention Kallenbach, who was a Molteno and Greene acquaintance as well as a friend of Schreiner's. See also Olive Schreiner: Herman Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.3. The 'woman peace programme' Schreiner mentions is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.26
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 March 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 Thank you for the fine chocolate & your good wishes. I am so sorry I
7was out when you came. I hope you like your new quarters. If I am
8better I'd like to come on Friday afternoon, but the difficulty is you
9might take all the trouble to come & I might not be able to go out.
10About 2.30 or 2. is the time I like always to go out, so that I can be
11back early.
12
13 Are you living in rooms, or have you taken a small house? I hope you
14have good news from India.
15
16 Yours very sincerely
17 Olive Schreiner
18

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.27
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date27 March 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I am so sorry I was out when you & Mr Tippet came. I can't come in the
7morning as I don't generally come down from my room till 1, lunch time,
8 as I do my writing & reading in the morning, & but I expect there's
9not much soup given out in the afternoon. However I'll try to come
10some afternoon.
11
12 Things don't seem very bright in India as they are having to pass new
13repressive laws there.
14
15 How will it all end?
16
17 Yours very sincerely
18 Olive Schreiner
19

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.28
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 April 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I am so sorry I was out I am too ill to go to theatre now I am glad
7you are so happy in your work. but I think you've made a very great
8mistake in leaving Earl's Court - I fear you may find it out later.
9
10 Yours ever
11 Olive Schreiner
12 I miss your kind visits much.
13

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.29
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 2 May 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3 Sunday
4
5 Dear Mr Kallenbach
6
7 I have lost your address so I am sending this to the old one. Perhaps
8they will forward it. I hope all goes very well with you. Are ^you^
9still staying on at New Maldon, or thinking of returning to Nine Elms.
10
11 I'd like to come & see the soup kitchen some day if you go back there.
12I am as usual spending as much time as I can in omnibuses, to get
13fresh air. I shall go later up to Scotland or Yorkshire to get cool,
14as I feel it already hot here.
15
16 Yours very sincerely
17 Olive Schreiner
18
19I hope you have good news from the Ghandis
20

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.30
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date3 May 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. This letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
1 May 3rd 1915
2 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
3 De Vere Gardens, W.
4
5 Dear Mr Kallenbach
6
7 I have written to you twice to Nine Elms asking them to forward it it
8to you as I'd mislaid your new address but now I've found it Do let me
9know how you are getting on. Are you coming back to help with the soup
10kitchen at Nine Elms again? I think I told you I met Mrs Despard at a
11meeting. What a fine noble face she has. Let me have a line to hear
12how you are
13
14 Yours ever
15 Olive Schreiner
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.31
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 May 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The date has been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I hope all is going well with you. I certainly didn't mean to give you
7any advice as to what you should or should not do about interment.
8Personally I think the safest thing for any German in London would be
9for him to be interned.
10
11 I only mentioned writing to Mr Roberts instead of his wife, ifyou did
12want to write to them ^at all^, about food or anything if you were
13interned, ^because I thought^ he would be the one most likely to take
14the trouble to do anything for you not she. ^from what I hear of them.^
15I'm sorry I can't make an appointment about meeting you at Kingston
16because I never know the day before when & where I shall go. I haven't
17been to Hampden Court or Richmond for a long time, but this afternoon
18I am going to Richmond I think.
19
20 I hope your little garden is doing well: & the carpentering getting on.
21
22 Good bye. Let me know how you are.
23
24 Yours ever
25 Olive Schreiner
26

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.32
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateJune 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 I hope you are still well & happy in your work Some day perhaps I
7shall come & see you. If I come from Kingston must I take the train or
8bus? Does the train or bus pass your door? I have been & am very
9unwell therefore I have not written.
10
11 Yours ever ^sincerely^
12 Olive Schreiner
13

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.33
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateJuly 1915
Address FromKensington Palace Mansions, De Vere Gardens, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The month and year have been written on this letter in an unknown hand. The letter is on printed headed notepaper.
1 Kensington Palace Mansions & Hotel,
2 De Vere Gardens, W.
3
4 Dear Mr Kallenbach
5
6 Thank you so much for the lovely flowers & the chocolates. I was too
7tired to come down to thank you my self last night. I am better but so
8utterly tired. I shall be better when I've been out a few times Thank
9you so much for all your great kindness.
10
11 Please tell them to send no more milk as I'm not drinking it now, & to
12send me the account. I am looking forward much to ?Fannies first play
13on Saturday.
14
15 Yours ever
16 Olive Schreiner
17
18 They gave you the wrong pamphlets I wanted ?Russells War the "Fear the
19origin of War" & they gave you Norman Angels. Perhaps they would
20change them?
21
22 The flowers are so beautiful.
23
Notation
The pamphlet referred to is: Bertrand Russell (1914) War: The Offspring of Fear London: Union of Democratic Control. The pamphlet by Angell is perhaps: Norman Angell (1915) The Problems of the War and Peace London: Heinemann.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.34
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date2 December 1915
Address From30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington, London
Address ToNo. 3612, Detention Camp, Douglas, Isle of Man
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The name of the addressee and the address this postcard was sent to are on its front. The postcard has been stamped 'censored'.
1 30 St Mary Abbotts Terrace
2 Kensington
3 London
4 Dec 2nd 1915
5
6 It is such a very long time since I heard any news of you. Did you get
7the little book of songs & music I sent you? Are you quite well. I am
8staying here again now address as above if ever you write. It seems as
9though this winter was going to be a very trying one. Ruth Alexander's
10father is dead.
11
12 Heartiest greetings from
13
14 Yours ever
15 Olive Schreiner
16

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.35
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date27 December 1915
Address FromKensington, London
Address ToNo. 3612, Detention Camp, Douglas, Isle of Man
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of its Special Collections. The date of this postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the addressee are on its front. The postcard has been stamped 'censored'.
1 Glad to hear all goes so well with you. May the new year find you in
2good health & good spirits.
3
4 OS
5
6 Kensington
7 London W.
8

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Hermann Kallenbach MSC 26/2.3.36
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date7 November 1916
Address FromDawson Place Mansions, Pembridge Square, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToHermann Kallenbach
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Dawson's Place Mansions
2 Pembridge Square
3 London W
4 Nov 7th 1916
5
6 Dear Mr Kallenbach
7
8 I am so glad to hear you are going to be exchanged. When will you be
9at Stratford? Is it Stratford on Avon? Are you not coming nearer to
10London where I might see you?
11
12 The little parcel you mention has not arrived. But I thank you from my
13heart for the kind thought of me. I suppose they have miscarried in
14the post. I am living here in a big boarding house. I long to see
15South Africa but I am getting worse, & not better. The Alexander's are
16well. I heard from her lately. Remember my permanent address is c/o
17Standard Bank 10 Clements Lane.
18
19 My nephew who was wounded is back in England. His right elbow was
20blown away & he will never have the use of his arm again. He has been
21given the Military Cross for leading his men on & taking two positions
22after he was wounded. He has also won a fellowship at Trinity College
23Cambridge.
24
25 Good bye dear friend. May all good attend you
26
27 Your friend
28 Olive Schreiner
29
30

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.1
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date20 August 1874
Address FromColesberg, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 14
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Colesberg
2 Aug 20th 1874
3
4 My dearest Katie!
5
6 I was very glad when your long silence was at last broken by the
7letter which I received last week & I was most glad to hear that you
8were all still well.
9
10 I am not feeling very well but am very comfortable in my new place &
11though I have had some very good positions offered me lately I think I
12shall remain where I am for some time to come.
13
14 I have just heard from a friend of mine at the shop Fields who tells
15me that Ettie has the measles very badly & I am of course very anxious
16for more news of her. It really seems as if she only went out of one
17illness in to another. All the little Weakleys have the measles; there
18are three of them still in bed with it so you may imagine how full our
19hands are just now.
20
21 I have not heard from Mamma for some time. but when Will was there she
22wrote, & told me she was well & that they were very soon to move over
23to Balfour
24
25 Give my love to the dear little people & with love to John,
26 I am ever dearest Katie
27 Yours very lovingly
28 Olive
29
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.2
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date19 February 1875
Address FromColesberg, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 15
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. The end of this letter is missing.
1 Colesberg
2 Feb 19th 1875
3
4 My dearest Katie!
5
6 I must write to thank you for the money you have so kindly lent me. It
7was very good of you & I shall not fail to return it as soon as I
8receive my first quarters salary.
9
10 I would have ?left last Thursday but was unfortunate eno to break a
11needle in my foot which became so bad that Mr Weakley was obliged to
12ask the Doctor to come up & cut it out. It is almost well now & I
13shall leave by the next coach for Cradock where Mr Fouchee the farmer
14with whom I am to live will come & fetch me. He only gives me £30 per
15an but aft the first quarter I am to have Mrs Cawoods children &
16several others to teach & hope at least £40. I have been very poorly
17lately but hope the change of air will do me good.
18
19 I have not hear from Theo or Ettie for more than two weeks. Dear kind
20Theo wrote very kindly offering to pay Papa & Mamma for my board if I
21liked to go home & live with them & also pay all my travelling
22expenses. It was just like his dear loving old heart to think of such
23a thing but I made up my mind when I was quite a little child that as
24soon as I was able I would support myself for I see no reason why a
25woman should be dependent on her friends any more than a man should &
26as long as I am well enough I shall
27
28[page/s missing]
29
Notation
Rive’s (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.3
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date15 April 1875
Address FromGanna Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 15-16
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Ganna Hoek
2 April 15th 1875
3
4 My dearest Katie!
5
6 Your letter which I receive last week was most welcome to me though I
7can't think how it is you had not received my last letter written the
8week after I got here. Perhaps the person with whom I sent the letter
9in forgot to post it. I am obliged here to avail myself of any & every
10opportunity in to Cradock or I should never get or receive a letter at
11all, & I am afraid they will often go astray.
12
13 I am getting on very well & like the life here much better than at
14first, but I have not been able to take any extra pupils which of
15course has been a disappointment to me.
16
17 The Fouchees are most kind & the girls very fond of me & getting on
18very well with their English
19
20 I hear that your trip to England has been put off for a time. What are
21you going to do with all the little ones? You will hardly be able to
22take them with you it would make it more of a labour than a pleasure.
23
24 Mr Muller has just told me that he is going in to Cradock so I must be
25contented to send you these few lines or nothing this week.
26
27 With love to the little people. I am ever dear Katie
28 Your most loving sister
29 Olive Schreiner
30
31 Ask little Katie to write to me. I am always so glad of her letters
32
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.4
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date27 June 1875
Address FromGanna Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 17
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Ganna Hoek
2 June 27th 1875
3
4 My dearest Katie
5
6 It is a bitterly cold evening & my hands are quite stiff with the cold
7but I must send you a few lines of thanks for the letter I received
8yesterday.
9
10 I am so glad Katie is so happy at School I shall write to her next
11week I suppose you have friends in Cape Town with whom she can spend
12her holidays. I only give mine two weeks, as Dutch people do not
13believe in holidays & they are not at all pleased that I have given
14any. It is quite impossible however to go on with out any rest from
15years end to years end impossible for both children & teacher.
16
17 I am feeling very unwell but I have hired an old woman to take my
18letters into Cradock & to fetch me some medicine which may do me good.
19
20 How are all the good folks in Transvaal going on?
21
22 Are you thinking of sending George to school soon. When are you going
23to England? It will be a great pleasure to you to see Fred to whom you
24must feel very much as I do to Will, my own brother who grew with me.
25
26 Theo & Ettie are well & are not finding so very badly just now. I hear
27only they cannot get niggers enough to work all his ground.
28
29 If you have any likenesses of yourself dear little Katie or any of the
30children I would be so glad of them Give Aunt Olive's love to the dear
31little people & believe me ever to be dear Katie
32
33 Your loving sister
34Olive
35
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.5
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date23 July 1875
Address FromGanna Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 17-18
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Ganna Hoek
2 July 23rd 1875
3
4 My dearest Katie!
5
6 This being the evening of your birthday, I must not go to bed with out
7writing you a few words to show you that you are not forgotten by me.
8I have been trying all day to make time for writing you a few lines,
9but have not been able to do so as Mrs Fouchee had some work she was
10very anxious to get done & I have been helping her with it.
11
12 I hope dear Katie that the year now beginning for you may be a very
13happy & bright one & have a great many successors.
14
15 I have not heard from you for so long a time that I am beginning to
16feel quite anxious for news.
17
18 I wrote to dear little Katie the week after I got the address but have
19had no opportunity of sending the letter into Cradock but hope I shall
20be able to get my letters posted this week.
21
22 I am feeling very well as this quiet country life suits me wonderfully,
23 & no one seeing me now would recognize me me as the same person I was
24six months ago. It is almost worth-while having been ill to know what
25the pleasure is of being well & strong again.
26
27 Do you still think of going to England?
28
29 Please write soon telling me all about your selves. With best love for
30your-self & the children dear Katie
31
32 Believe me to remain
33 Your very affecate sister
34 Olive Schreiner
35
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.6
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 November 1875
Address FromGanna Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 19
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1 Ganna Hoek
2 Nov 2nd 1875
3
4 My dear Katie!
5
6 I was indeed beginning to fancy that I should never hear of or from
7you again & was very glad when Mr Fouchee came home from Cradock
8yesterday evening bringing me your letter.
9
10 I am so glad to hear that dear little Katie is getting on so well at
11Cape Town. I wrote to her a few weeks back. Willie seems delighted
12with his niece & writes glowing accounts of her. Do you think of
13sending Georgie to school soon?
14
15 I am hoping to be able to get into Cradock the week after next, as Mrs
16Fouchee is going in to have her baby baptised & I mean to have my
17photo taken & if it turns out at all well will send you one next time
18I write. I will be much disappointed if I can’t go in, as in the eight
19months I have been here I have only been in once & am quite longing
20for the sight of English faces again.
21
22I have just been reading the paper with Ettie’s last speech in it.
23Friends writing from the fields, say that when ever she speaks she
24seems quite to carry away ^by^ her earnest manner & eloquent delivery,
25all her audience. I should very much like to hear her speak in public.
26
27I have quite given up all idea of going to America. Getting a salary
28of thirty pounds a year I might save till I was eighty before I had
29got enough to take me there. The year I have promised to remain here,
30ends in February & Mrs Fouchee wants me to agree for another four, but
31I shall not do so. & am not even sure that I shall not when the year
32is done advertise for another situation. I have had the offer of two
33very good ones lately, one in which I would get 70 & in the other
34eighty pounds but there were a great many drawbacks to them & I have
35no intention of accepting either of them. Money is not every thing
36that has to be considered.
37
38My children are getting on well; they quite astonish me by the
39progress they make. The eldest girl sometimes shows an amount of
40thought that one finds in very few English children.
41
42It is getting dark so I must bring this letter to a hasty close & I
43hope it is not to remain as long with out an answer as the last
44
45Give much love & many kisses to the children & with much for yourself
46
47I remain dearest Katie
48Your affecte sister
49Olive Schreiner
50
Notation
The newspaper report of Ettie Schreiner's (later Stakesby Lewis) speech cannot be traced. Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.7
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 April 1876
Address FromGanna Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 20
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Ganna Hoek
2April 5th 1876
3
4My dear Katie!
5
6You owe me ever so many letters, but then I should have written long
7ago to thank you for the likeness of my dear little niece, which you
8sent me through Mamma.
9
10It is a very good one. Everyone who sees it admires it greatly. One
11friend of mine, Mrs Cawood, likes it so much, that she is always
12begging me to give it her.
13
14I hope you are all well, & that I shall soon have a long letter from
15you. It really is a terrible long time since I heard of, or from you.
16
17I am leaving my present situation in a few weeks time for another, & I
18think much better one.
19
20I dare say you remember Martain, who used to be the Dutch minister in
21Aliwal: He left the church on account of his liberal views & is now
22farming in the district. He offers me a much larger salary than I am
23getting here & I believe ^they^ are very nice people.
24
25When next you write, which I hope will be very soon address your
26letter just: Miss O Schreiner Cradock
27
28With much love for yourself & the dear little ones.
29I remain dear Katie
30Your very affecate sister
31Olive
32
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.8
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 August 1876
Address FromRatel Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 20
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Rattel Hoek
2Aug 13th 1876
3
4My dearest Katie!
5
6Many thanks for your letter which I received last week. I am so glad
7to hear that you are comfortably settled in your new home. I took a
8great fancy to Rattel Vontein & think it must be very much pleasanter
9to live there than at Fraserburg. It is not so far from the village
10but that you can some times go in, & to me at least, farm life is ever
11so much pleasanter than town.
12
13I like baby’s name, & hope the dear little man, will continue to
14thrive well. Are his eyes blue, or brown?
15
16I am glad to hear that dear little Katie is getting on so well. Do you
17not very much long to see her some times?
18
19I have just go a long letter from dear old Auntie. Lily’s change of
20views seems to have been a great blow to her. Emmie had just gone to
21Aliwal for a change & Tattie and her little ones are well.
22
23I have been here a little more than three months now, & am very well
24pleased with my berth. Mrs. M. is one of the sweetest tempered women I
25ever met, & Mr. M. a very intelligent man. I have plenty of school
26books & a nice piano, so teaching is easy work. The only drawback
27about the place, is, that I seem to be so far from all my friends.
28
29I hope I shall very soon hear from you dear sister.
30
31Write very soon to yours very affectly
32Olive
33
34Much love to the little ones.
35
36
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.9
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date27 January 1877
Address FromRatel Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 20-1
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections. After the paragraph ending 'before I can see her again', a portion of this letter has been torn away.
1Rattel Hoek
2Jan. 27th 1877.
3
4My dear Katie!
5
6I have to thank you for a letter, & to tell you of my safe return from
7my wanderings.
8
9I enjoyed my stay with dear Mamma. She is far from strong but looking
10better than I had hoped to find her.
11
12She has some kind friends there, but is sadly alone & I can see no way
13in which we can manage to be together. I suppose I must wait patiently
14till June before I can see her again. [paper torn away]
15
16Love to all the little ones.
17
18I met at Mr. Fletcher in Queenstown who says that he knows John & all
19the Findlays very well. Does John still remember him?
20
21We are having splendid rains here & have more fruit than we know what
22to do with. I suppose you have plenty also at your farm. Do you often
23get into Fraserburg? Have you many visitors.
24
25Write soon & give me all your news dear Katie.
26
27Ever your loving sister
28Olive
29
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.10
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date4 February 1878
Address FromSeymour, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 4; Rive 1987: 21
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Seymour,
2Feb. 4th 1878.
3
4My dear Katie!
5
6It is so long since you last wrote to me that I can’t at all
7remember when it was. I know you owe me two letters, but I shall be
8very good & write again.
9
10Mamma has just received a letter from you, & we were glad to hear that
11you were all well.
12
13I was very glad also to hear of you from Willie, who was much
14delighted with your little ones. How much you must wish to see your
15dear little Katie. Will says she is growing into a really beautiful girl.
16
17I am as you see still at Seymour, but I think I shall be leaving next
18week. On my way back I ^shall^ spend a week with the John Hemmings in
19Queenstown. They are exceedingly nice people & have shown me a great
20deal of kindness. The war still goes on, & is nearer to us now than
21ever, but I don’t think we are in any real danger just yet. All the
22men in the district are armed. We got 300 fresh guns from Beaufort
23last week.
24
25The photos you mention in Mamma’s letter have not arrived. Do if you
26can, send me some. I should so much prize one of yourself. Can not you
27have one taken. I have not got one of you nor of any of the children
28except Katie.
29
30Hoping very soon to hear from you I will now close dear Katie.
31
32Ever with love for yourself & the little ones,
33I am
34Your loving sister
35Olive Schreiner
36
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.11
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date18 March 1878
Address FromRatel Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 21-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Ratel Hoek
2March 18 / 78
3
4My dear Katie!
5
6Many thanks for the letter which Mamma has just sent me. I was glad to
7see you had not quite forgotten me. I shall be very glad of the photos
8you mention. Please send them as soon as you can. I am very glad to
9hear that you are all still well & that your dear children at school
10are making good progress. I should much like to see you all again.
11
12We have had splendid rains & the country is looking beautiful. It was
13too dry for the orange trees to blossom at the right time - but they
14are all in blossom now. As I sit writing the sweet scent comes in at
15my window.
16
17I feel very anxious about Mamma. Not that there is any danger where
18she is, but the excitement may do her harm. I do hope this war will
19soon be over.
20
21Please write as soon as you are able; & believe me to remain, dear
22Katie,
23Your ever aff:cte
24sister
25Olive Schreiner
26
27Love to the little ones.
28
29^I send you a photo. I hope you will like it.^
30
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.12
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date31 May 1878
Address FromRatel Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 22
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Ratel Hoek
2May 31st 1878.
3
4My dear Katie!
5
6Many thanks for your letter. I thought you had almost forgotten me.
7
8I will send you another likeness as soon as I can get more from
9Queenstown. Please tell me which sort it was I sent you, & I will send
10you one of the other kind this time. Was I leaning over a chair, or
11was it just a head, alone?
12
13When-ever you have a chance you must be sure to have your own taken. I
14have not one of you, nor of John, nor of the dear little ones, except
15Katie.
16
17It is beginning to get very cold here & there is much sickness about,
18especially croup. Mr. Martin’s little boy of eleven years has had a
19very bad attack, & I hear that children in Cradock as old as thirteen
20^years^ have had it; This is very strange, as it seldom attacks children
21of more than seven years.
22
23I had a letter from dear Mamma by last post. She was pretty well, but
24suffering a little from sore eyes, & not feeling strong at all.
25
26I wish very much she could come up & visit me when the cold weather is
27over as I shall not be able to go down to Seymour till Christmas.
28
29I know the Martins would be very glad to see her. But travelling is so
30expensive & there are so few opportunities that I am half afraid she
31will not be able to manage it.
32
33I hope dear Katie it will not be so
34
35^long before I hear from you again. I am always very glad of your
36letters.
37
38With love to all the dear little ones,
39I remain
40Your affecate sister,
41Olive^
42
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.13
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 January 1879
Address FromRatel Hoek, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 23
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Ratel Hoek
2Jan. 26 / 79.
3
4My dear Katie,
5
6I have not heard from your for a very long time, but I hope you will
7not be sorry of a line from me.
8
9Dear Mamma is now staying with me. It is a great pleasure to have her
10with me, as you may fancy. You too must be very glad to have your dear
11little daughter – you must ask her to write to me sometimes when you
12have not time. I often wish that I could see you all once more.
13
14It is still very dry here, but we have had a little rain, & hope we
15shall have some more soon.
16
17I think Mama likes Ratel Hoek & Mr. & Mrs. Martain & all the children
18seem quite fond of her.
19
20If You must write to me soon dear Katie. I am always so glad of your
21letters, & if the boys are taken at Beaufort you must please send me
22their likenesses. I should like to see if they have grown or changed
23much. Have you not got an old likeness of yourself which you could
24send me dear Katie? I have not got one of any kind & would so much
25like to have one of my dear eldest sister.
26
27In haste with love to all. Believe me to remain dear Katie,
28Your affecte sister
29Olive
30
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.14
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 July 1879
Address FromSeymour, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 23-4
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Seymour
2July 25 / 79
3
4My dear Katie
5
6I send you a likeness of Mamma which I have had taken. I think you
7will be glad to have it though it is not so good as it might be having
8been taken in the open air.
9
10I have had a very pleasant visit here & leave again for Cradock on
11Monday.
12
13You must address your next letter –
14Miss O. Schreiner, Lillie Kloof, P.O. Eland’s Drift, Dist. Cradock,
15and I hope you will write soon. How is it I never hear from you. Do,
16as you promised, send one of your likenesses down to town & have
17copies taken from it. That picture in which you & George are together
18is a very nice one.
19
20Give my best love to Katie & all the little ones, & with much love for
21yourself in which Mamma joins me.
22
23I remain,
24Your loving sister,
25Olive
26
27P.S. I suppose you have heard of poor Maggie Rolland’s death. I hear
28that Emmie Hope is now in Grahamstown visiting Lillie Orpen.
29
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.15
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date12 September 1879
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 24
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Lily Kloof
2Sep. 12 / 79.
3
4My dear Katie
5
6I was very glad to get your letter & have sent Mama’s on to her. I
7am only sorry that the letter did not contain a likeness of yourself.
8Have you not got an old one of yourself that you could spare for me. I
9have not got any likenesses of you, at all.
10
11I am glad to hear you are all well & getting on pleasurably.
12
13I like my new situation very much. I have two nice girls to teach & so
14far have found the place suit my health very well. The farm lies high
15up among the mountains & is about five hours from Cradock. There is a
16large poplar bush like that on your farm.
17
18I suppose Alice has already left for England.
19
20I hope my chest will get quite strong that I too may go, some day.
21
22Give my love to Katie & all the children. I suppose Maggie & Emma are
23growing quite big girls! I hope you will not leave me very long
24without news of yourselves. I am always very glad to hear from you, &,
25though this note is short, write very soon dear Katie to
26
27Your loving sister
28Olive Schreiner
29
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.16
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date29 May 1880
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 8; Rive 1987: 24-5
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Lily Kloof
2May 29 / 80
3
4My dear Katie
5
6I have let your last letter lie rather long unanswered but in truth I
7am very busy & do not find much time for writing. I am in school or
8helping the children to prepare their lessons the greater part of the
9day & in the evening am often more inclined to lie down & read than to
10sit writing letters.
11
12I hope you are all still well. I am very glad that dear Mamma seems so
13happy in Grahamstown. I am sure Lilly means to be kind to her.
14
15I hope you write to Mamma pretty often, for I know she is always very
16glad of a letter from you. We are having bitterly cold weather here
17among the mountains. Already we have had two heavy falls of snow about
18the house. But the cold suits me well & I am much better than I was
19all the sup summer.
20
21The Fouche’s are very kind to me, & I grow more & more fond of the
22children who are very warm hearted & loving, & not at all more stupid
23than English children.
24
25Give my best love to Katie, & all the little ones. I suppose George &
26Hudson are still at Cape Town. Do you often go into Fraserburg? Do the
27Smiths still live there?
28
29Write soon, dear sister, to me and believe me always to remain
30Yours affectly,
31Olive Schreiner
32
33P.S. I send you a likeness of myself; if you have one like it already
34please give it to Katie. I’m sorry it has got scratched.
35
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.17
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date27 January 1880
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 25
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Lily Kloof
2Jan. 27 / 80
3
4My dear Katie
5
6Many thanks for your letter & likenesses. It is very nice to be able
7to look at my dear sister’s face sometimes.
8
9Thanks also for the two pretty cards you sent me. It is long since I
10last wrote to you but I have been sick, & have also been down for a
11little visit to Mamma. She was not looking very well when I left, & it
12was very hard to say goodbye to her. I wish you could pay her a visit
13some day, or that she could go to spend a week or two with you. What a
14long way we all are from each other. Aren’t we?
15
16I am very glad to hear that your boys are doing so well at Cape Town,
17& that the little ones at home are all well. I hope it will not be
18long before I hear from you again.
19
20We are having very heavy rains here: all the bridges & roads are
21injured by the last storm.
22
23The farm is looking very pretty & green, but we have very little fruit
24here & no flowers.
25
26If the boys have their likenesses taken in Town don’t forget me.
27
28With love to all,
29I am ever, dear Katie,
30Your loving sister,
31Olive
32
Notation
Rive's (1987) version has been misdated, omits part of the letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.18
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date14 October 1880
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 9; Rive 1987: 25
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Lily Kloof
2Oct. 14 / 80
3
4My dear Katie
5
6I have allowed your letter to remain rather long unanswered. In truth,
7it is very difficult to get a chance of posting. I have to take
8advantage of any old Hottentot or Boer happening to pass to send my
9letters to Town.
10
11I was much grieved to hear of Alice’s dreadful loss. Dear old
12Leo’s death I especially felt for I loved the child very much. I can
13not yet realize that he is gone.
14
15I hope all your dear little ones are well. Are your boys still at the
16Cape? George must be quite a great fellow by this time.
17
18I am very well, better than I have been for years. The cold mountain
19climate suits me splendidly. We went into Cradock the week before last
20to nachtmaal, but I was very glad to get back to the farm again. All
21is looking beautifully green here, but the frost has destroyed almost
22all the fruit.
23
24Mrs. Fouche’s little Baby was baptized when we went in to Town, & I
25am its godmother. It is a very pretty little thing & I am very fond of
26it. The two girls I teach are nice loving children & give me no
27trouble at all. It is certainly much pleasanter to teach among the
28Dutch than among the English.
29
30I hope you will not leave this letter as long as I have left yours
31without an answer.
32
33My address is simply,
34Miss Schreiner, Cradock.
35
36With love to all believe me to remain, dear Katie,
37Your very affecate sister,
38Olive
39
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.19
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date19 November 1880
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 26
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Lily Kloof
2Nov 19 / 80.
3
4My dear Katie
5
6You have not yet answered my last; but there is a good opportunity of
7posting; I’ll not let it pass without sending you a line.
8
9It is a bitterly cold evening, the mountains near this white with snow,
10 & every promise of a heavy frost tonight, for which I am very sorry
11as we have been busy making gardens. Have you a flower garden at
12Balmoral? I here have only gone in for vegetables which the good Boers
13seem to like better.
14
15I must not forget to tell you that in February I am going to England,
16to become a nurse in one of the large hospitals I have at last saved
17enough money for the voyage; & my cough is so much better I think I
18need not fear the climate. I can at least try! If it does suit me, I
19shall never return to this country.
20
21The Basuto war is causing much trouble in this part of the country.
22Nearly all the young Boers have had to go to the front; & it is very
23hard just at this busy time of the year for them to have to leave
24their farms. At all events they make a great noise about it. Two men
25from this farm have had to go. I suppose you have read the notices of
26poor Hamilton Hope’s death. I felt it much for he & his wife were
27very good & kind friends to me when I was friendless.
28
29Write soon dear Katie and believe me always
30Your loving sister
31Olive
32
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/1.14.20
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date5 January 1881
Address FromLily Kloof, Halesowen, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 9; Rive 1987: 26-7
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Lilys Kloof
2Jan 5 / 81.
3
4My dear Sister
5
6I was glad when this afternoon’s post brought me a letter from you.
7Leading this quiet farm life one seems to prize letters even more than
8one would do living in Town. I am glad to hear it all goes well with
9you still. I shall be delighted to get photos of the boys. I only wish
10I could get a really good one of you.
11
12As to my own plans all being well I hope to leave Lily Kloof on the
137th of February. I shall go to Grahamstown & leave ^spend^ a few days
14with Mama, I think a week. I shall then sail. Of course the steamer
15will call at Cape Town, & if I have time I should like to see Hudson.
16At what school is he? I intend going to the Royal Infirmary of
17Edinburgh when I go to England. I don’t think I shall ever return to
18this country unless my health gives way again. I shall spend about a
19week with Fred before I go up to Edinburgh. I am not going to become a
20Doctor: that costs money of which I have none, but one can become a
21nurse without paying anything, & after all if they cannot be of so
22much use as the doctors they can still relieve a great deal of
23suffering.
24
25You must excuse this wonderfully written blotted letter, but the
26children are playing about me, touching pen, ink, paper & everything.
27
28I had a letter from Fred this afternoon. Three boys in his school are
29lying ill of a fever, & the poor old fellow is very anxious about them.
30
31I suppose you will have seen something of Ettie while she was at
32Fraserburg. I wish I could have seen her to say goodbye before I leave.
33
34^Good bye dear old Katie
35With love to all believe me ever
36Your affectate sister
37Olive
38
39Thanks for your kind offer but I have quite made up my mind to go.^
40
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect. Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version is incorrect in various ways.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.21
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 February 1881
Address FromGrahamstown, Eastern Cape
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 27
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1Grahamstown
2Feb 26 / 81.
3
4My dear Katie!
5
6I was most glad of your letter & cannot leave old Africa without a
7farewell word to my eldest sister. I sail on the fourth of March from
8Port Elizabeth in the Kinfauns Castle. I think we shall spend three
9days in Table Bay. I wish I knew at which school Hudson was, that I
10might see him. I am very sorry you could not send him with me. Mamsy
11sends much love. I wish she could get a nice change of air some where
12
13Give my best love to little Katie & all the rest. Tell Katie to
14address to Fred’s care if she writes, & you must be sure & write soon.
15
16Lilly as been very kind to me indeed. I am now sitting to write at a
17beautiful desk she has just given me. Her children are very nice
18little folks. I shall be most glad of the likenesses you promised me.
19
20I have not been very well since I was here but I think the voyage will
21set me up & prepare me for my work.
22
23Goodbye dearest Katie.
24
25Love to all from Lilly & Mamma.
26Ever your affecte sister
27Olive
28
Notation
Rive's (1987) version omits part of this letter and is also in a number of respects incorrect.

Letter Reference Olive Schreiner: Katie Findlay MSC 26/2.14.22
ArchiveNational Library of South Africa, Special Collections, Cape Town
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 April 1881
Address FromNew College, Eastbourne, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToCatherine ('Katie') Findlay nee Schreiner
Other VersionsRive 1987: 31-2
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to the National Library of South Africa (NLSA), Cape Town, for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of its Special Collections.
1New College
2Eastbourne
3April 2nd 1881.
4
5My dear Katie
6
7I hope the letter I sent you just before I sailed has reached you
8safely. I have thought much of you in your great sorrow my poor old
9sister. I saw your dear Hudson in Cape Town, & was in every way
10delighted with the boy. I think him very like Will & he seems to me an
11exceedingly clever child. I hope John will make an advocate or doctor
12of him.
13
14I hope you are all well. Give my best love to Katy & tell her I am
15longing to hear again from her.
16
17I arrived in England on the 30th & was met in London by Fred & Will.
18They both came down with me to Eastbourne where I have since been
19staying.
20
21Fred is a dear loving old fellow, whom I am sure you would like. I
22think I have never been so happy in my life as since I have been here.
23I shall not be going up to Edinburgh for about a month & when you
24write you had best address to Fred’s care. He has a splendid house &
25grounds, & & the hundred & ten boys in his school seem most happy.
26
27Goodbye dear sister. With much love & much sorrow for your great &
28terrible loss,
29I am ever yours very