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Letter Reference Levine Collection/16
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date1 March 1907
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToAnnie Botha nee Emmett
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection.
1Hanover
2C C
3March 1st 1907
4
5Dear Mrs Botha,
6
7I am sending you a copy of my husbands book.
8
9I heard of the fine stand you made during the war & my heart was
10always with you.
11
12Yours very sincerely,
13Olive Schreiner
14
Notation
The book referred to in the letter is: Cronwright-Schreiner (1906) The Land of Free Speech London: New Age Press; an inscribed copy from Olive Schreiner to Annie Botha is also part of the Levine Collection.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/17
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateAugust 1908
Address FromCape Town, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToMrs Balmsforth
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Content indicates where the letter was written from. A letter Schreiner wrote to Lucy Molteno on 20 August 1908 refers to a meeting to be held at Mrs Brown’s (Olive Schreiner BC16/Box4/Fold1/1908/55), which suggests the letter was perhaps written just before this, and thus its dating. The Balmsforths are mentioned in various letters which indicate that Schreiner knew them over a period of years; Ramsden Balmsforth was a Unitarian clergyman who opposed the South African War, but no further information about the Balmsforths has been established.
1Dear Mrs Balmsforth
2
3The meeting has had to be put an end to, as I have just found Mrs
4Brown is getting up a meeting at Rondebosch on that day, & I don’t
5want to take any of the people who might go there. So I am getting Mrs
6Macintosh to go there to speak. I was going to have the meeting here
7in town. I do wish it wasnt such a climb to get to you. I should often
8look in & see you.
9
10Yours ever
11Olive Schreiner
12

Letter Reference Levine Collection/18
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date2 September 1913
Address FromDe Aar, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToRamsden Balmsforth
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The Balmsforths are mentioned in various letters which indicate that Schreiner knew them over a period of years; Ramsden Balmsforth was a Unitarian clergyman who opposed the South African war, but no further information about the Balmsforths has been established. The pamphlet referred to cannot be traced.
1De Aar
2Sep 2nd 1913
3
4Dear Mr Balmsforth
5
6Would it be possible you to get me a copy of ?Markrystals pamphlet for
7which he has got 4 months & hard labour. I want to write about it but
8can’t do so till I’ve seen it. When you think of the things ?Castens &
9other swells in England are saying & writing – rank treason – one
10wonders whether ?Markrystals pamphlet is so much more:
11
12Yours ever
13Olive Schreiner
14
15^I know no one in Jo’burg whom I could ask to get me the pamphlet^
16

Letter Reference Levine Collection/19
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateThursday March 1914
Address FromPension White, Florence, Italy
Address To
Who ToMiss Priestly
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The month and year of this letter are derived from content and when Schreiner was undergoing treatment with Carloni in Florence. Nothing further is known about Miss Priestly.
1Pension White
2Thursday morning
3
4Dear Miss Priestly
5
6I am so sorry I was out when you called this morning. I was at
7Carloni’s where I have to be every day from 9.30 to 12 o’clock. If you
8could call for me at Carloni’s at 11.30 tomorrow I would arrange to
9leave 12 half an hour sooner. Carloni’s address is 39 Via Cavour. It
10is so kind of you to ask me. Thank you for the lovely flowers, they
11give one a real spring feeling.
12
13Yours sincerely
14Olive Schreiner
15

Letter Reference Levine Collection/20
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateSunday 15 October 1914
Address FromThe Windsor, 61 & 62 Lancaster Gate, Hyde Park, London
Address To
Who ToMargaret Moscheles
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Schreiner stayed at the Windsor Hotel for two or three weeks in October 1914, and moved (very briefly) to Durrant’s Hotel on Monday 17 October, thus how the letter has been dated. The letter is written on embossed headed hotel notepaper.
1Telephone 7266 Paddington
2The Windsor.
361 & 62, Lancaster Gate, W.
4
5Sunday
6
7Dear Mrs Moscheles
8
9I have only got your letter this afternoon as it was addressed to 10
10not 30.
11
12I came back from Hythe on Wednesday as I had got ill there.
13
14I am staying at the above address, but may be leaving on Monday for
15Durrants Hotel Manchester Sq, but if you should write at any time
16please address
17c/o Mrs Smith
184 Gloucester Place
19Portman Sq
20London W
21as my friend Mrs Smith will send all letters on. I should much have
22liked to come on Friday. I have long wished to meet your husband &
23should much like to see his pictures. It is indeed a pleasure to meet
24congenial friends now.
25
26You will have read that fine letter in the Nation by H la Fontaine
27which expresses exactly my view – only are there enough broad passing
28spirits to build up the new world. – a world in which humanity shall
29stand first & mere National & class interests second. When one sees
30the world about one raging with hate & the thirst for blood one’s hope
31trembles, but each right word & act helps slowly to bring near the
32time that must come at last
33
34Yours ever
35Olive Schreiner
36
Notation
The letter by Henri La Fontaine which was published in the Nation & Antheneum cannot be established.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/21
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Wednesday December 1916 ; Before End: March 1917
Address From19 Adam Street, Portman Square, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMargaret Moscheles
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The letter has been dated by reference to when Schreiner was resident in Adam Street, which was between late December 1916 and March 1917.
119 Adam Street
2Portman Sq
3^Wednesday^
4
5Dear Mrs Mochelles
6
7I am so sorry to hear your husband is so unwell. This cold & thaw &
8damp is enough to make any one ill. I set you today to come & inquire
9how your husband was, but when I got to Hyde Park Corner I turned back.
10 The cold was too intense.
11
12I do hope he will be better soon.
13
14Yours ever
15Olive Schreiner
16
17I should have liked so much to meet Mrs ?Slipman.
18

Letter Reference Levine Collection/22
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Monday April 1917 ; Before End: December 1917
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMargaret Moscheles
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. This letter can be dated around the death of Felix Moscheles in December 1917. Schreiner was resident at Porchester Place from early April 1917 until August 1920, when she left Britain for South Africa.
^1Telephone
26906
3Paddington^
4
59 Porchester Place
6Monday
7
8Dear Mrs Moscheles
9
10Mrs Greene & I did so enjoy the afternoon with you.
11
12Could you give me the name & address of that interesting actress in
13the black dress. I think she said it was ‘Hanburg’ but am not sure. I
14want to ask her to tea some afternoon.
15
16I did not like to trouble your dear husband to talk much as he looked
17so frail. How wonderfully he keeps the clear blue light in his eyes,
18as clear as a child’s. “Blessed are the pure in heart” they make me
19think.
20
21I am going to spend the week end with the Schutzes, in their country
22cottage.
23
24Yours with love & thanks for a delightful afternoon
25Olive Schreiner
26

Letter Reference Levine Collection/23
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date25 December 1917
Address From9 Porchester Place, Edgware Road, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMargaret Moscheles
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The letter can be dated around the death of Felix Moscheles in December 1917. The telephone number ‘6506’ is underlined twice.
^1Telephone
26506 Paddington^
3
49 Porchester Place
5Edgware Rd
6Xmas Morning
7
8Dear Mrs Marscheles
9
10I have just seen the notice in the paper of your husbands death – a
11beautiful existence, spent in producing beauty, ended. I always see
12the beautiful look in his clear eyes as he sat under the trees in your
13garden the last time but one I saw him; they were as clear as a childs.
14
15When you come back please let me know when I can come & see you.
16
17With deep love & sympathy
18Yours ever
19Olive Schreiner
20

Letter Reference Levine Collection/24
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter DateMarch 1912
Address FromMuizenberg, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToCaptain Bourne
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Schreiner appears to have known Captain Bourne during 1912 and he is mentioned in a 29 March 1912 letter to Isie Smuts (Smuts A1/194/10/52); thus the dating of this letter and also the place it is likely to have been written from.
1Dear Captain Bourne,
2
3Thankyou for your letter. I was surprised to hear that the gov= were
4going to invite women, & not at all to hear they were not!
5
6I was delighted to meet your wife, she so delightfully direct & full
7of life. I hope I shall some day see more of her.
8
9Yours very sincerely
10Olive Schreiner
11

Letter Reference Levine Collection/15
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date13 August 1901
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToCaptain Skeet
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Captain Skeet was appointed the local British military Commandant in Hanover in mid 1901, and this together with content regarding Rebecca Schreiner’s decline and Warner’s letter to Skeet below indicates the place and year of the letter.
1Dear Captain Skeet
2
3My husband promised he would post me a letter from the station last
4night. letting me know what It has not come. If possibly still in the
5censor’s hands would you let me know. I want to wire to him if he is
6still at the station & did not get off.
7
8Yours faithfully
9Olive Schreiner
10
11I have just sent a wire to my sister in Grahamstown, address Mrs Lewis
12The Convent
13Grahamstown
14to know how my mother is this morning. If you could do anything to
15hasten it getting through ^& my getting their reply^ I should be deeply
16grateful.
17
18My old mother has been for some months in a sinking condition & always
19longing to see me but I have been too ill. She is a Catholic & lives
20in the Convent there, I think she must be very bad or my sister would
21not have gone back to her. She is a very strong jingo & I cannot think
22the military authorities would object to my going to see her if I am
23able. I would only stay in Grahamstown & come back by the first train
24as I cannot stand stay near the coast.
25
26Yours faithfully
27Olive Schreiner
28
Notation
With Schreiner’s letter there is a further letter, sent to Captain Skeet by R. Warner regarding Schreiner’s situation in Hanover, and attached to this is a newspaper clipping. They are as follows:

Naauwpoort
13 / 8 / 01

Dear Skeet

Many thanks for your letter. I shall be coming down to Hanover the end of the month but don’t know about my wife as these block houses appear to do a deal of loose firing!

My wife sends her kind regards & wants to know if you will be treating her better than Olive Schreiner ?in ?an attached cutting!

Yours ever
R. Warner

P.S. Let me know if you have any difficulties about bills -

The newspaper cutting refers (erroneously) to Olive Schreiner’s treatment under martial law and cites an extract from an article by the popular writer Ouida:

“MME. SCHREINER A PRISONER? TWO OPINIONS ABOUT OUIDA’S STARTLING STORY.

An anti-British journal published yesterday a hysterical outbreak by Ouida on the subject of Olive Schreiner’s treatment by the British officials. The following is an extract: -

“It is, I think, entirely true that Mme. Olive Schreiner has been transported to a strange place and imprisoned within a fence of wire netting, which is protected by armed sentinels stationed at intervals, with orders to fire upon any one attempting to get through the netting and escape. In this place she lives alone with her dog, in one small room, for which she pays. Cooking for herself, and compelled to remain all night without any kind of light; her husband being refused by the English authorities permission to visit her, although he is the brother of the ex-Premier of the Cape Ministry.

“Apparently Mme. Schreiner has no other crime than that of sympathy with the Boer people, which one naturally would expect her to feel, her writings being what they are. It does not appear that she has either fought or conspired against the English invaders. She is a writer with original views of her own, and an intimate acquaintance with the races and lands whereof she writes. Is it tolerable that for this alone she should be subjected to indignity and isolation, and be carried away from all she loves?”

Mr Fisher Unwin, Olive Schreiner’s publisher, interviewed by a “Westminster Gazette” representative, states that there is reason to believe that there is substance in the story – that Mme. Schreiner is undergoing physical hardships and that her papers and manuscripts have been burnt.

On the other hand, the secretary of the Imperial South African Association in London thinks that the account is an absolute fabrication, except that Mme. Olive Schreiner is living at Richmond, in Cape Colony, under military surveillance.”

It is not possible to establish from what newspaper the cutting has been taken.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/14
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Friday June 1901 ; Before End: December 1901
Address FromHanover, Northern Cape
Address To
Who ToCaptain Skeet
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Captain Skeet was appointed the local British military Commandant in Hanover in mid 1901, and thus the place and dating of the letter.
1Friday
2
3Dear Captain Skeet
4
5I shall have much pleasure in sending you a copy of An African Farm
6when I get some from England as I hope to shortly.
7
8I hope you will have a good time at Matjesfontein which is a
9delightful place, & a safe & happy return to the old country when you
10do go.
11
12Yours very sincerely
13Olive Schreiner
14

Letter Reference Levine Collection/13
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: January 1897 ; Before End: February 1897
Address From19 Russell Road, Kensington, London
Address To
Who ToUnknown
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The addressee of this letter cannot be identified, although it may have been T. Fisher Unwin. Schreiner stayed several times in Russell Road with her friend Alice Corthorn when visiting England. It is unclear when precisely this letter was written but it is likely to have been during January and February 1897 while Schreiner was in London organising the publication of Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland. The letter is written on printed headed notepaper.
119, Russell Road,
2Kensington, W.
3
4Dear Sir
5
6I could not allow my story to appear in a serial form. If it should be
7that you do not desire to make an offer for it in Book form, kindly
8return it to me at once.
9
10Yours faithfully
11Olive Schreiner
12
Notation
The story which Schreiner did not want to be published in serial form is likely to be Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/12
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date8 May 1890
Address FromMatjesfontein, Western Cape
Address To
Who ToUnknown
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection.
1Matjesfontein
2Cape of Good Hope
3South Africa
4May 8 / 90
5
6My dear Friend
7
8I have got your note. I have not published many things besides those
9you mention. There is an allegory in the Fortnightly for August 1887,
10I think that is right. I am sure as to the year but not the month, &
11some other short things I have published in different papers. But they
12have all been collected into a volume & will soon be published.
13
14I am so grateful that anything I have written should in anyway have
15helped.
16
17Yours very sincerely
18Olive Schreiner
19
20If you will write to my friend
21Miss Alice Corthorn
2269 Chancery Lane
23London
24She will tell you when & where the little volume is to be published. I
25do not myself know as I have left the M.S. in the hands of friends.
26
Notation
The allegory referred to in this letter is: ‘Three dreams in a desert’ Fortnightly Review August 1887, vol 42, pp.198-203. The ‘little volume’ referred to is Dreams.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/11
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: June 1888 ; Before End: September 1888
Address FromRoseneath, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The name of the addressee is suggested by letter content. Schreiner was resident in Harpenden from June to September 1888, when she left for Alassio, hence its dating.
1Roseneath
2Harpenden
3Herts
4
5Dear Sir
6
7Would you kindly get for me & sent by post Kegan Pauls Life of Godwin,
8Letters to Imlay, & any other work you may have by K Paul bearing on
9Mary Wollstonecraft’s life. I am greatly in need of these books at
10once, & should feel it a great favour if you would send them me soon.
11Please send them by book or parcel post & I shall at once return some
12of the books I have now. I shall pay the postage when I come in next week.
13
14Yours faithfully,
15Olive Schreiner
16
Notation
The books referred to are: C. Kegan Paul (1876) William Godwin, His Friends and Contemporaries London: Henry S. King & Co; and Mary Wollstonecraft (1879) Letters to Imlay, With a Prefatory Memoir by C. Kegan Paul London: no publisher given.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/10
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date After Start: June 1888 ; Before End: September 1888
Address FromRoseneath, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The address the postcard was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front, while the postmark is illegible. Schreiner was resident in Harpenden from June to September 1888, when she left for Alassio, hence its dating.
1Roseneath
2Harpenden
3Herts
4
5This will you be my address for some months. Will you kindly send the
6Fortnightly here. I wish to renew my subs-cription, & shall call in a
7day or two.
8
9Olive Schreiner.
10

Letter Reference Levine Collection/9
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date18 July 1888
Address FromRoseneath, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
Address To57 & 58 Chancery Lane, London, WC
Who ToMiss M.E. Duck
Other Versions
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Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The date of the postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front. No further information about Miss Duck is available. Schreiner was resident in Harpenden from mid June to the end of September 1888.
1Many thanks for doing it so quickly: Will you as soon as finished send
2typewritten copy to me Mr H H Ellis
398 Earlsbrook Rd
4Earlswood
5Surrey,
6& send the original copy with the bill to me here.
7
8Olive Schreiner
9
Notation
There is a note attached to this postcard which refers to the card and comments ‘Olive Schreiner’s autograph’. It also has written on it ‘Dr A. L. Rake, from M. E. Duck’, ‘Monday January 25th 1897’ and ‘See cutting from Sun ^25/1/97^ ?re. return of Mrs Cronwright-Schreiner by Dunvegan Castle with Cecil Rhodes.’ The cutting is no longer attached.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/8
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date2 July 1888
Address FromRoseneath, Harpenden, Hertfordshire
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The address the postcard was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front, while the postmark is very hard to read and the year illegible. Schreiner was resident in Harpenden from mid June to the end of September 1888. Schreiner mentions planning to read The New Antigone in a letter written to Mary Drew dated May 1888 (Mary Gladstone (Mrs Drew) Add. 46244, ff.166-167); the year of the postcard is derived from this.
1Could you kindly send the new Antigone for me to the care of Miss
2Corthorn
369 Chancery Lane
4
5Olive Schreiner
6
Notation
The book referred to is: William Barry (1887) The New Antigone London: Macmillian & Co.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/7
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date26 March 1888
Address FromGrand Hotel, Alassio, Italy
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The date of the postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front.
1Will you kindly send me Hartmann’s Philosophy of the Unconscious. If
2you have not got it would you very kindly send me a card to that
3effect that I may order it else where.
4
5Thank you for so quickly sending the Anthropoid Apes.
6
7Olive Schreiner
8“Grand Hotel Alassio”
9
Notation
The books referred to are: Eduard von Holtmann (1880) Philosophy of the Unconscious London: David Bogue; and Robert Hartmann (1880) Anthropoid Apes With Illustrations London: International Scientific Series.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/6
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date18 March 1888
Address FromGrand Hotel, Alassio, Italy
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The date of the postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front.
1Grand Hotel
2Alassio
3Italy
4
5Would you very kindly send me as soon as possible the work on
6Anthropoid apes in the Inter=Science Series. I should feel it a
7special favour if you could send it me very shortly as I much require
8it. I return one vol: of Newton’s life & the reviews. I have still one
9vol. of Gibbon, & one of Newton.
10
11Olive Schreiner
12
13^Would you also kindly send me the 3rd vol of Gibbon’s “?Roman Empire”^
14
Notation
The books referred to are: Robert Hartmann (1880) Anthropoid Apes With Illustrations London: International Scientific Series; Edward Gibbon (1776-1787) The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire London: Macmillan; David Brewster (1888, new edition) The Life of Sir Isaac Newton London: Gall and Inglis.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/5
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date29 January 1888
Address FromGrand Hotel, Alassio, Italy
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The date of the postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front.
1Darwin (2 vols) returned.
2Kindly send Brewster’s “Life of Newton.”
3Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman, the complete edition, not the small
4selection lately published in England.
5Last vol of Darwin’s “Plants & Animals”
6
7Olive Schreiner
8Grand Hotel
9Alassio
10Italy.
11
Notation
The books referred to are: George Bettany (1887) Life of Charles Darwin London: Walter Scott; David Brewster (1888, new edition) The Life of Sir Isaac Newton London: Gall and Inglis; Walt Whitman (1855) Leaves of Grass Brooklyn: New York; and Charles Darwin (1868) The Variation of Plants and Animals Under Domestication Chicago: Weller & Metcalf.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/4
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypePostcard
Letter Date12 January 1888
Address FromGrand Hotel, Alassio, Italy
Address ToLondon Institution, Finsbury Circus, City, London
Who ToLibrarian, London Institution
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner postcard, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. The date of the postcard is provided by the postmark and the address it was sent to and the name of the addressee are on its front.
1I am sorry the last books were kept so long: by a mistake they were
2sent by parcel’s post, so took two weeks to come instead of two days.
3Would you kindly send me the further volumes of Darwin’s Life, &
4Gibbon’s Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire”. If you have it in small
5vols please send me the two first: also the a novel One that Wins.
6Darwin’s life, or the novel would be returned in a few days.
7
8Olive Schreiner
9Grand Hotel,
10Alassio.
11
Notation
The books referred to are: George Bettany (1887) Life of Charles Darwin London: Walter Scott; Edward Gibbon (1776-1787) The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire London: Macmillan; David Brewster (1888, new edition) The Life of Sir Isaac Newton London: Gall and Inglis; and By the author of ‘Whom Nature Leadeth’ (1887) One That Wins: The Story of a Holiday in Italy London: T. Fisher Unwin.

Letter Reference Levine Collection/3
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date After Start: Sunday August 1885 ; Before End: October 1885
Address From16 Portsea Place, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToFrederic Chapman
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Schreiner was resident at Portsea Place from mid August to late October 1885, hence the dating of this letter.
116 Portsea Place
2Connaught Sq,
3W
4
5Sunday
6
7My dear Mr Chapman
8
9I have heard that Mr Meredith is very ill. Could you ^kindly^ tell me if
10this is true? I am so great an admirer of his works that I am very
11anxious to know, & would be glad if you could send me a card if it
12will not be troubling you too much.
13
14Could you kindly tell me what his address is?
15
16Yours sincerely,
17Olive Schreiner
18

Letter Reference Levine Collection/2
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date26 May 1885
Address From41 Upper Baker Street, Westminster, London
Address To
Who ToMiss Dunn
Other Versions
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. No further information is available about Miss Dunn.
141 Upper Baker St
2May 26 / 85
3
4Dear Miss Dunn
5
6I am so sorry I have an engagement for Friday evening. I should so
7much have liked to come.
8
9I shall try to come on Saturday afternoon.
10
11Yours sincerely
12Olive Schreiner
13
14Do read Ibsen. Everything he has written in^s^ worth reading!
15

Letter Reference Levine Collection/1
ArchiveRonald Levine Collection, Johannesburg
Epistolary TypeLetter
Letter Date8 April 1885
Address FromHastings, East Sussex
Address To
Who ToHavelock Ellis
Other VersionsCronwright-Schreiner 1924: 69
PermissionsPlease read before using or citing this transcription
Legend
The Project is grateful to Ronald Levine for kindly allowing us to transcribe this Olive Schreiner letter, which is part of the Ronald Levine Collection. Its content provides the name of the addressee, while Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version provides the date and that it was written from Hastings.
^1Have just received this please go & see them, & write & tell me just how
2Aveling is - If he gets dangerously ill I must go & see him. Please go.
3
4Miss Marks called this afternoon; she is delightful, charming, an
5emotional Miss Müller, tell me all you can about her. I am not yet
6able to go out. Will try tomorrow, legs bother & I keep getting faint.
7
8Olive^
9 ^
10I haven't been able to work today.
11
12I shall be able to see your father when I am in London. If the A's are
13very hard up I must try to send them something but I am hard up myself
14just now.
15
16I like you a little even though you are a man^
17
Notation
Cronwright-Schreiner's (1924) version of this letter is incorrect in various ways. The letter is written onto a letter to Schreiner from Eleanor Marx, which is on printed headed notepaper and as follows:

55, Great Russell Street, W. C.
5. 4. 85.

My darling Olive,

I always long for you, but now more than ever. Edward is very ill. You will know all that means to me. I could not tell you. The real help is that you need no telling – Donkin (blessings on him!) was here this morning. With care, it may be over soon: on the other hand it may be serious. You will know all the agony there is in that “may.”. He depends really on the "care" he takes. But how can the poor - & we are very poor - take care? ….

Darling, I can’t write though there is much I fain would say to you. You will understand.

Write to me my own little Olive.
Your
Eleanor